Joanne Leach

Joanne Leach
University of Birmingham · School of Civil Engineering

MSc Design Management

About

34
Publications
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Introduction
I am a researcher in transdisciplinarity, infrastructure and cities at the University of Birmingham, UK, seeking to answer the question: how can we create sustainable, resilient and liveable cities? I am currently working with UKCRIC, the UK Collaboratorium for Research on Infrastructure and Cities, to create a world-class national infrastructure research capability (www.ukcric.com). To find our more about me, visit birmingham.ac.uk/staff/profiles/civil/leach-joanne.aspx

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
The development process at the site/building scale is a multi-objective process requiring the cooperation of many professions and other stakeholders. The addition of multiple sustainability objectives, often seemingly unrelated (economic versus environmental versus social) in a rapidly changing global urban context, further constrain and complicate...
Technical Report
Many of the specialisms upon which infrastructure and cities rely for their effective design, operation, governance, management and maintenance are underpinned by the principles of certainty, accuracy, precision and prediction. Not least of these is civil engineering. Yet, infrastructures and cities are characterised by complexity and emergence. In...
Article
Full-text available
There is currently great interest in the creation of sustainable and liveable cities, both in the UK and globally. While it can be argued that good progress is being made in thinking about the needs of future cities, meeting these needs and aspirations in practice poses major challenges of understanding and measurement (what is meant by these terms...
Article
For policymakers, planners, urban design practitioners and city service decision-makers who endeavour to create policies and take decisions to improve the function of cities, developing an understanding of cities, and the particular city in question, is important. However, in the ever-increasing field of urban measurement and analysis, the challeng...
Article
Full-text available
Full text free to download from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264275116305509. Despite the attention sustainability-related urban measurement and assessment methods have received it is still not well understood how accurate (or not) the various methods are; their limitations in holistic city performance assessment; or, how they...
Article
Full-text available
This data article presents the UK City LIFE1 data set for the city of Birmingham, UK. UK City LIFE1 is a new, comprehensive and holistic method for measuring the livable sustainability performance of UK cities. The Birmingham data set comprises 346 indicators structured simultaneously (1) within a four-tier, outcome-based framework in order to aid...
Article
While natural and manufactured resources provide the raw materials with which civil engineers work, the term ‘resources’ should always be considered in its wider interpretation and then in the context that resources are in many cases limited. That they should be used wisely (resource efficiency) is beyond contention – we do this as a matter of cour...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, much of the literature on sharing in cities has focused on the sharing economy, in which people use online platforms to share underutilized assets in the marketplace. This view of sharing is too narrow for cities, as it neglects the myriad of ways, reasons, and scales in which citizens share in urban environments. Research presented here...
Book
Full-text available
This Little Book examines whether it is possible for cities to function in the future without cars. The book examines what is a car, what the car-system is and how it works, and whether it is possible to ensure that the uses and benefits of cars could be realised without millions of moving and parked cars and their associated infrastructures. It al...
Article
Full-text available
Energy is a vital resource in modern life. With increasingly limited availability of traditional energy resources, e.g., oil, coal and nuclear, together with environmental concerns, there is raised awareness that energy needs to be both used more efficiently and generated in line with thinking on sustainability. Ready access to ‘clean’ energy is es...
Article
Full-text available
The rise in the influence of sustainability principles has resulted in an almost overwhelming number of methods for defining, measuring and assessing sustainability and liveability. For such assessments to be accurate they must have a clearly defined 'sustainability and liveability space', be designed for the context in which the measurements are t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The UK economy has moved away from traditional large-scale and standardised manufacturing processes (Fordism) towards a more service-based economy and smaller-scale and more specialised manufacturing (post-Fordism). A more variegated, smaller-scale and specialised economy seems to fit better with more flexible provision of critical infrastructures....
Article
Full-text available
Tree planting is widely advocated and applied in urban areas, with large-scale projects underway in cities globally. Numerous potential benefits are used to justify these planting campaigns. However, reports of poor tree survival raise questions about the ability of such projects to deliver on their promises over the long-term. Each potential benef...
Article
Full-text available
Tree planting is widely advocated and applied in urban areas, with large-scale projects underway in cities globally. Numerous potential benefits are used to justify these planting campaigns. However, reports of poor tree survival raise questions about the ability of such projects to deliver on their promises over the long-term. Each potential benef...
Article
Planners, architects, urban designers and other built environment professionals engage with a myriad of checkboxes, guidelines, requirements and specifications, all of which potentially compromise creativity and innovation in urban design. Approaches that measure performance are accused of belying the nature of places as messy, plural, organic, acc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Well-functioning 'liveable' cities should be sustainable and their consumption of natural resources and production of waste must fit within the capacities of the local, regional and global ecosystems. It is increasingly becoming suggested that an Urban Metabolism (UM), approach could help city decision-makers (e.g. planners) take account of numerou...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Engineered infrastructures (i.e., utilities, transport & digital) underpin modern society. Delivering services via these is especially challenging in cities where differing infrastructures form a web of interdependencies. There must be a step change in how infrastructures deliver services to cities, if those cities are to be liveable in the future...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Future Urban Living Policy Commission took evidence from a wide range of leading thinkers on cities from the UK and elsewhere, drawing from it ideas that might inform the way that we live, work and play in the cities and towns of the future. It then tested these ideas with a similarly diverse set of leaders in the various fields of urban activi...
Conference Paper
Resources, such as food, water, metals and minerals, are in ever-increasing demand by cities, particularly as urban environments grow and the climate changes. In many cases these resources are dwindling and it is becoming increasingly evident that their more efficient use is required. The Liveable Cities project was established to understand how ci...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Infrastructure forms the framework within which modern societies operate both at the physical and social level. It includes (amongst others) digital, green and social infrastructures, emergency services and food networks, water, energy, waste and transport. Infrastructure, by its very nature, locks in behaviours. The Liveable Cities research consor...
Article
Full-text available
The pressures of population growth, finite resource and food supplies, increasing energy demand and climate change all impact on the way we live and work, and potentially have a negative effect upon our wellbeing and quality of life. "Living as we are and scaling back simply will not work", writes Professor Chris Rogers, principal investigator for...
Article
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Future scenarios provide challenging, plausible and relevant stories about how the future could unfold. Urban Futures (UF) research has identified a substantial set (>450) of seemingly disparate scenarios published over the period 1997–2011 and within this research, a sub-set of >160 scenarios has been identified (and categorized) based on their na...
Book
PDF AND HARD COPIES ARE ONLY AVAILABLE FROM THE BRE BOOKSHOP: http://www.brebookshop.com/details.jsp?id=326921 Global urbanisation is increasing dramatically and most of the world’s population now lives in cities. The environmental impact of cities has received much attention in the global debate, making urban sustainability a top priority – for l...
Article
Full-text available
Making cities more sustainable is a top priority – for national governments, for cities and for the people who live, work and visit urban areas. The past decade has seen a concerted UK effort to develop, apply and assess sustainability solutions for the present and near future; however, little has been done to test urban regeneration solutions beyo...
Article
Full-text available
Scenarios are a useful tool to help think about and visualise the future and, as such, are utilised by many policymakers and practitioners. Future scenarios have not been used to explore the urban context in much depth, yet have the potential to provide valuable insights into the robustness of decisions being made today in the name of sustainabilit...
Book
Full-text available
The SUE Research Dialogues Workshop was designed to bring together the academics funded under the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Sustainable Urban Environment (SUE) Programme. These academics came from a wide range of disciplines that had been brought together by EPSRC to collaborate on research into sustainable urban en...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Archived project
Sustainable Regeneration - from Evidence-based Urban Futures to Implementation is a unique research effort that establishes and tests alternative future scenarios, providing insights into the potential sustainability impact of today's urban regeneration decisions. Sustainability, no matter what definition is used, is all about the future - putting in place now solutions to problems that will yield a positive rather than negative future legacy. The essential underlying question is "how sustainable are these solutions?" while the answer inevitably is "it depends on how the future develops". Sustainable Regeneration - from Evidence-based Urban Futures to Implementation is a four year research project which started in May 2008 and finished in April 2012, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). The project consortium is led by the University of Birmingham and includes the University of Exeter, Lancaster University, Birmingham City University and Coventry University.
Archived project
The Future Urban Living Policy Commission took evidence from a wide range of leading thinkers on cities from the UK and elsewhere, drawing from it ideas that might inform the way that we live, work and play in the cities and towns of the future. It then tested these ideas with a similarly diverse set of leaders in the various fields of urban activities. This evidence is clustered in a sub-section of the final report under headings that strongly reflect the future challenges and opportunities for the UK’s urban areas, as identified by witnesses and interpreted by the Commissioners. The major themes emerging from the evidence have been captured in a model that seeks to inform those governing, and hence developing policies for, the UK’s cities, so that they can help us move towards a more sustainable and resilient future. This evidence is presented as a stand-alone chapter, along with a commentary on the interdependence of these influences and how they can be aligned to produce positive outcomes for both cities and their citizens. The final chapter draws out the remarkable richness in the evidence and concludes with six recommendations for local and national policy-makers. The final report and executive summary can be downloaded from the following link. http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/impact/policy-commissions/future-urban-living/index.aspx