Joanna M Setchell

Joanna M Setchell
Durham University | DU · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

142
Publications
41,000
Reads
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4,702
Citations
Introduction
My research integrates behaviour, morphology and demographic studies with genetics, endocrinology and semiochemistry to address questions relating to reproductive strategies, life history, sexual selection and signalling in primates. Most of my work has focused on a semifree-ranging colony of mandrills at the Centre International de Recherches Médicales, Franceville (CIRMF), Gabon.
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - present
Durham University
Position
  • Managing Director
Description
  • BEER is a cross-faculty group that unites staff and students in Anthropology, Archaeology, Psychology, Education and Biological and Biomedical Sciences. https://www.dur.ac.uk/beer-centre/
April 2013 - present
Durham University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
April 2010 - April 2013
Durham University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (142)
Article
Full-text available
The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is an extraordinarily diverse cluster of genes that play a key role in the immune system. MHC gene products are also found in various body secretions, leading to the suggestion that MHC genotypes are linked to unique individual odourtypes that animals use to assess the suitability of other individuals as p...
Article
Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-associated mate choice is thought to give offspring a fitness advantage through disease resistance. Primates offer a unique opportunity to understand MHC-associated mate choice within our own zoological order, while their social diversity provides an exceptional setting to examine the genetic determinants and...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife tourism is proliferating worldwide and has the potential to raise revenue for conservation as well as public awareness of conservation issues. However, concerns are growing about the potentially negative influence of such tourism on the wildlife involved. We investigate the effects of habituation, ecotourism and research activities on leve...
Book
Cambridge Core - Animal Behaviour - Studying Primates - by Joanna M. Setchell
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity conservation is one of the grand challenges facing society. Many people interested in biodiversity conservation have a background in wildlife biology. However, the diverse social, cultural, political, and historical factors that influence the lives of people and wildlife can be investigated fully only by incorporating social science me...
Article
Olfactory communication plays an important role in the regulation of socio-sexual interactions in mammals. There is growing evidence that both human and nonhuman primates rely on odors to inform their mating decisions. Nevertheless, studies of primate chemical ecology remain scarce due to the difficulty of obtaining and analyzing samples. We analyz...
Article
Background The occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites in the sun-tailed monkey (Allochrocebus solatus) at the CIRMF primatology center is unknown. We, therefore, assessed the presence and richness (number of different parasite taxa) of gastrointestinal parasites in a semi-free-ranging colony of A. solatus. Methods A total of 46 fecal samples wer...
Article
Wildlife ecotourism can offer a source of revenue which benefits local development and conservation simultaneously. However, habituation of wildlife for ecotourism can cause long-term elevation of glucocorticoid hormones, which may suppress immune function and increase an animal’s vulnerability to disease. We have previously shown that western lowl...
Article
Samango monkeys (Cercopithecus albogularis schwarzi) in the Soutpansberg Mountains, South Africa, experience a highly seasonal climate, with relatively cold, dry winters. They must show behavioural flexibility to survive these difficult conditions near the southern limit of the species’ distribution and maintain the minimum nutritional intake they...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the historical context of an area enables an incoming conservationist to reflect on their role in communities and to better position themselves both politically and socially within them. Here, we explore how outside agencies and institutions, including a former colonial power, have affected and influenced local communities who share t...
Article
Full-text available
Accentuated lines in dental microstructure are hypothesized to correlate with potentially stressful life history events, but our understanding of when, how and why such accentuated lines form in relation to stressful events is limited. We examined accentuated line formation and life history events in the teeth of three naturally deceased mandrills...
Article
Full-text available
Female primates signal impending ovulation with a suite of sexual signals. Studies of these signals have focussed on visual, and to a lesser extent, acoustic signals, neglecting olfactory signals. We aimed to investigate the information content of female olfactory signals in captive olive baboons ( Papio anubis ) and relate these to the female fert...
Article
All Neotropical primates are arboreal and thus depend on forests for their survival. Arboreality puts many Neotropical primates at risk of extinction due to the high rates of deforestation in the tropics. We assessed the influence of vegetation structure and forest patch attributes on the occurrence of the threatened red‐handed howler monkey (Aloua...
Article
In their reply to our article "A new identification of the monkeys depicted in a Bronze Age wall painting from Akrotiri, Thera" [Primates 61(3), 2019], Urbani and Youlatos (Primates https://doi.org/10.1007/s10329-020-00825-2 , 2020) argue for the traditional identification of the monkeys depicted on the north and west walls of Room 6 of Building Co...
Article
Full-text available
Threats to biodiversity are well documented. However, to effectively conserve species and their habitats, we need to know which conservation interventions do (or do not) work. Evidence-based conservation evaluates interventions within a scientific framework. The Conservation Evidence project has summarized thousands of studies testing conservation...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives We examine how dental sexual dimorphism develops in mandrills, an extremely sexually dimorphic primate. We aimed to (a) establish the chronology of dental development (odontochronology) in male and female mandrills, (b) understand interindividual and intersex variation in odontochronologies, and (c) determine how dental sexual dimorphism...
Article
Members of the sucking louse genus Pedicinus are ectoparasites of cercopithecid primates in Africa, Asia, and Gibraltar. Pedicinus gabonensis n. sp. is described based on adult male and female specimens collected from the mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) in Gabon. The new species is compared morphologically with other members of the genus Pedicinus, an...
Article
Bronze Age Aegean (ca. 3500-1100 B.C.) wall paintings from the islands of Crete and Thera depict monkeys in a variety of roles such as running wild in nature, possibly following (trained) commands, and participating in sacred activities. These images, while stylistically Aegean, are traditionally considered closely related to—and descendant from—Eg...
Article
Full-text available
Stress is a major factor in determining success when releasing endangered species into the wild but is often overlooked. Mandrills (Mandrills sphinx) are vulnerable to extinction due to habitat loss and demand for bush meat and the pet trade. To help bolster in situ populations, rehabilitated rescued mandrills recently were released into a protecte...
Article
Full-text available
People's perceptions of primates vary across and within cultures and may not be consistent with their behavior toward the primates themselves. We used qualitative data from semistructured and unstructured interviews with shepherds from 10 villages around Bouhachem oak forest in Morocco to describe and discuss shepherds' behavior when they encounter...
Presentation
Full-text available
Bronze Age Aegean wall paintings depicting monkeys from Crete and Thera show the animals in a variety of roles, from wild to possibly trained, to cultic or sacred. These images, while stylistically Aegean, are closely related to—and seem to be descendant from—Egyptian and Near Eastern monkey and ape iconography. While monkey depictions in these lat...
Article
Full-text available
Conservationists consider open and direct communication as best practice even when their data conflict with local beliefs. However, ensuring the effective delivery of a controversial message without overtly challenging community identity is difficult. Such a scenario needs high levels of meaningful contact and trust-building dialogue between conser...
Article
Primates were traditionally thought to have a reduced sense of smell. Although there is now evidence that olfaction plays a greater role in primate social life than previously assumed, research on the sense of smell in non-human apes is scarce. Chimpanzees sniff the ground and vegetation on boundary patrols, but the function of this behaviour is un...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are the only species to have evolved cooperative care-giving as a strategy for disease control. A synthesis of evidence from the fossil record, paleogenomics, human ecology, and disease transmission models, suggests that care-giving for the diseased evolved as part of the unique suite of cognitive and socio-cultural specializations that are...
Book
Cambridge Core - Communications - The Cambridge Handbook of Group Interaction Analysis - edited by Elisabeth Brauner
Article
Full-text available
Strategies for conserving species threatened with extinction are often driven by ecological data. However, in anthropogenic landscapes, understanding and incorporating local people's perceptions may enhance species conservation. We examine the relationships shepherds, living on the periphery of the mixed oak forest of Bouhachem in northern Morocco,...
Chapter
Phyllis C. Lee is Professor of Psychology at Stirling University, Scotland. She has conducted fieldwork on baboons, vervet monkeys, and elephants since 1975. Her research interests focus on physical growth; cognitive and social development; behavioral ecology and reproductive strategies; life history evolution; and biodiversity conservation.
Chapter
The International Journal of Primatology is an official publication of the International Primatological Society, published by Springer. It is devoted to fundamental research on primates and aims to promote the survival of the primate populations of the world. The International Journal of Primatology publishes high-quality original articles, reviews...
Article
Full-text available
Nonhuman primates, our closest biological relatives, play important roles in the livelihoods, cultures, and religions of many societies and offer unique insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and the threat of emerging diseases. They are an essential component of tropical biodiversity, contributing to forest regeneration and ecosystem he...
Chapter
Drills (Mandrillus leucophaeus) and mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) are the only two extant species in the genus Mandrillus. They are large, highly sexually dimorphic, and extremely colorful. They live in very large groups in the rainforests of west central Africa. Very little is known about the ecology and social organization of drills, although man...
Article
Female choice for male major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genotype has been widely tested, but the relationship between male mating strategies and female MHC genotype has received far less attention. Moreover, few studies of MHC-associated mate choice test for the fitness effects underlying such choice. We examined mate-guarding by male mandril...
Article
Sexual selection has become a major focus in evolutionary and behavioral ecology. It is also a popular research topic in primatology. I use studies of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx), a classic example of extravagant armaments and ornaments in animals, to exemplify how a long-term, multidisciplinary approach that integrates field observations with la...
Article
Full-text available
Capture is one of the top ethical concerns of field primatologists, and darting is a common method of capturing primates. Little is published, however, about the safety of darting practices and conditions for the animals concerned. We conducted a literature review to examine trends in the reporting of darting methods and results, and two anonymous...
Article
Full-text available
A comprehensive understanding of the role of androgens in reproduction, behavior and morphology requires the examination of female, as well as male, hormone profiles. However, we know far less about the biological significance of androgens in females than in males. We investigated the relationships between fecal androgen (immunoreactive testosteron...
Article
Full-text available
Prenatal androgens are responsible for sex differences in behaviour and morphology in many species, causing changes in neural structure and function that persist throughout life. Some variation in the expression of behaviour between individuals of the same sex can also be attributed to differences in exposure to prenatal sex hormones. The ratio of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background / Purpose: Primates are traditionally considered to be microsmatic, with decreased reliance on olfactory senses in comparison to other sensory modalities such as vision. This is particularly the case for Old World monkeys and apes (catarrhines). However, some catarrhines possess scent-glands, suggesting that they do communicate via odo...
Technical Report
Full-text available
A committee of field primatologists representing major primatological societies and organizations from Africa, Asia, Europe, and North, Central, and South America have crafted a "code of best practices" to help field primatologists navigate the contemporary ethical landscape.
Article
A large body of evidence suggests that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genotype influences mate choice. However, few studies have investigated MHC-mediated post-copulatory mate choice under natural, or even semi-natural, conditions. We set out to explore this question in a large semi-free-ranging population of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) u...
Article
A large body of evidence suggests that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genotype influences mate choice. However, few studies have investigated MHC-mediated post-copulatory mate choice under natural, or even semi-natural, conditions. We set out to explore this question in a large semi-free-ranging population of mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) u...
Article
Maternal effects can influence offspring growth and development, and thus fitness. However, the physiological factors mediating these effects in nonhuman primates are not well understood. We investigated the impact of maternal effects on variation in three important components of the endocrine regulation of growth in male and female mandrills (Mand...
Conference Paper
According to ‘good genes’ paradigms, costly secondary sexual characters attract mates by indicating heritable genetic quality. Mate choice may also occur for complementary genes. MHC genes represent obvious candidates for the genetic benefits of mate choice due to their role in disease resistance. We investigated the relationship between male secon...
Article
The concept of female cycle (or estrous) synchrony has enduring popular appeal. However, critical reviews of estrous synchrony studies in both humans and non-humans have found that synchrony has not been demonstrated convincingly, due to methodological artifacts and statistical problems. Studies of this phenomenon in animals living under naturalist...
Book
Building on the success of the first edition and bringing together contributions from a range of experts in the field, the second edition of this guide to research on wild primates covers the latest advances in the field, including new information on field experiments and measuring behaviour. It provides essential information and advice on the tech...
Article
We examined variation in glucocorticoid levels in the mandrill, a brightly coloured primate species, to identify major social influences on stress hormones, and investigate relationships among glucocorticoid levels, testosterone and secondary sexual ornamentation. We collected a total of 317 fecal samples for 16 adult male mandrills over 13 months,...