Joana I Meier

Joana I Meier
University of Cambridge | Cam · Department of Zoology

PhD

About

49
Publications
15,591
Reads
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2,236
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2018 - December 2018
Physalia
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Speciation Genomics (course for PhD students, postdocs and PIs from across the globe)
October 2018 - September 2022
University of Cambridge
Position
  • Fellow
September 2017 - December 2017
Universität Bern
Position
  • Speciation course
Description
  • Course on speciation for third-year students of ecology and evolution. Interactive course with lectures, paper presentations by students, and discussions
Education
March 2012 - May 2016
Universität Bern
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution
June 2010 - December 2010
University of Vermont
Field of study
  • Biology
September 2007 - March 2012
Universität Bern
Field of study
  • Ecology and Evolution

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Full-text available
Modes and mechanisms of speciation are best studied in young species pairs. In older taxa it is increasingly difficult to distinguish what happened during speciation from what happened after speciation. Lake Victoria cichlids in the genus Pundamilia encompass a complex of young species and polymorphic populations. One Pundamilia species pair, P. pu...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding why some evolutionary lineages generate exceptionally high species diversity is an important goal in evolutionary biology. Haplochromine cichlid fishes of Africa’s Lake Victoria region encompass >700 diverse species that all evolved in the last 150,000 years. How this ‘Lake Victoria Region Superflock’ could evolve on such rapid timesc...
Article
Speciation is often thought of as a slow process due to the waiting times for mutations that cause incompatibilities, and permit ecological differentiation or assortative mating. Cases of rapid speciation and particularly cases of rapid adaptive radiation into multiple sympatric species have remained somewhat mysterious. We review recent findings f...
Article
Studies on polymorphisms have been foundational to our understanding of evolution. The presence of different phenotypic morphs is sometimes considered a precursor to speciation in which morphs evolve into different species. While speciation should initially reduce genetic variation in daughter versus parental species, a common pattern is the recurr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Genetic variation segregates as linked sets of variants, or haplotypes. Haplotypes and linkage are central to genetics and underpin virtually all genetic and selection analysis. And yet, genomic data often lack haplotype information, due to constraints in sequencing technologies. Here we present “haplotagging”, a simple, low-cost linked-read sequen...
Article
Full-text available
Intraspecific colour polymorphisms (CPs) present unique opportunities to study fundamental evolutionary questions, such as the link between ecology and phenotype, mechanisms maintaining genetic diversity and their putative role in speciation. Wrasses are highly diverse in ecology and morphology and harbour a variety of colour-polymorphic species. I...
Preprint
Full-text available
Repeated evolution can provide insight into the mechanisms that facilitate adaptation to novel or changing environments. Here we study adaptation to high altitude in two divergent tropical butterflies, H. erato and H. melpomene, which have repeatedly and independently adapted to high elevations on either side of the Andean mountains. We sequenced 5...
Article
Full-text available
Sex determination systems are highly conserved among most vertebrates with genetic sex determination, but can be variable and evolve rapidly in some. Here, we study sex determination in a clade with exceptionally high sex chromosome turnover rates. We identify the sex determining chromosomes in three interspecific crosses of haplochromine cichlid f...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how organisms adapt to their local environment is central to evolution. With new whole‐genome sequencing technologies and the explosion of data, deciphering the genomic basis of complex traits that are ecologically relevant is becoming increasingly feasible. Here we study the genomic basis of wing shape in two Neotropical butterflies...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic variation segregates as linked sets of variants or haplotypes. Haplotypes and linkage are central to genetics and underpin virtually all genetic and selection analysis. Yet, genomic data often omit haplotype information due to constraints in sequencing technologies. Here, we present “haplotagging,” a simple, low-cost linked-read sequencing...
Article
If there are no constraints on the process of speciation, then the number of species might be expected to match the number of available niches and this number might be indefinitely large. One possible constraint is the opportunity for allopatric divergence. In 1981, Felsenstein used a simple and elegant model to ask if there might also be genetic c...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding how organisms adapt to their local environment is central to evolution. With new whole-genome sequencing technologies and the explosion of data, deciphering the genomic basis of complex traits that are ecologically relevant is becoming increasingly feasible. Here we study the genomic basis of wing shape in two Neotropical butterflies...
Article
Full-text available
Speciation rates vary considerably among lineages, and our understanding of what drives the rapid succession of speciation events within young adaptive radiations remains incomplete1–11. The cichlid fish family provides a notable example of such variation, with many slowly speciating lineages as well as several exceptionally large and rapid radiati...
Article
African cichlid fishes are a prime model for studying speciation mechanisms. Despite the development of extensive genomic resources, it has been difficult to determine which sources of genetic variation are responsible for cichlid phenotypic variation. One of their most variable phenotypes is visual sensitivity, with some of the largest spectral sh...
Article
Full-text available
Background Diploid genome assembly is typically impeded by heterozygosity because it introduces errors when haplotypes are collapsed into a consensus sequence. Trio binning offers an innovative solution that exploits heterozygosity for assembly. Short, parental reads are used to assign parental origin to long reads from their F1 offspring before as...
Article
Full-text available
The East African cichlid radiations are characterized by repeated and rapid diversification into many distinct species with different ecological specializations and by a history of hybridization events between nonsister species. Such hybridization might provide important fuel for adaptive radiation. Interspecific hybrids can have extreme trait valu...
Article
Full-text available
Hybridization between invasive and native species has raised global concern, given the dramatic increase in species range shifts and pest outbreaks due to anthropogenic dispersal. Nevertheless, secondary contact between sister lineages of local and invasive species provides a natural laboratory to understand the factors that determine introgression...
Article
Full-text available
Microclimatic variability in tropical forests plays a key role in shaping species distributions and their ability to cope with environmental change, especially for ectotherms. Nonetheless, currently available climatic datasets lack data from the forest interior and, furthermore, our knowledge of thermal tolerance among tropical ectotherms is limite...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Diploid genome assembly is typically impeded by heterozygosity, as it introduces errors when haplotypes are collapsed into a consensus sequence. Trio binning offers an innovative solution which exploits heterozygosity for assembly. Short, parental reads are used to assign parental origin to long reads from their F1 offspring before assem...
Preprint
Full-text available
African cichlid fishes are a prime model for studying the mechanisms of speciation. Despite the development of extensive genomic resources, it has been difficult to determine which sources of genetic variation are responsible for variation in cichlid phenotypes. Cichlids have some of the largest known shifts in vertebrate visual sensitivity. These...
Preprint
Full-text available
Microclimatic variability in tropical forests plays a key role in shaping species distributions and their ability to cope with environmental change, especially for ectotherms. Yet, currently available climatic datasets lack data from the forest interior and our knowledge of thermal tolerance among tropical ectotherms is limited. To tackle this, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hybridization between invasive and native species has raised global concern given the dramatic increase in species range shifts and pest outbreaks due to climate change, development of suitable agroecosystems, and anthropogenic dispersal. Nevertheless, secondary contact between sister lineages of local and invasive species provides a natural labora...
Article
Full-text available
The process of adaptive radiation was classically hypothesized to require isolation of a lineage from its source (no gene flow) and from related species (no competition). Alternatively, hybridization between species may generate genetic variation that facilitates adaptive radiation. Here we study haplochromine cichlid assemblages in two African Gre...
Article
Full-text available
Interspecific hybridization is the process where closely related species mate and produce offspring with admixed genomes. The genomic revolution has shown that hybridization is common, and that it may represent an important source of novel variation. Although most interspecific hybrids are sterile or less fit than their parents, some may survive an...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic divergence between closely related species has long interested biologists. Taxa that inhabit a range of environments and have diverse natural histories can help understand how selection drives phenotypic divergence. In butterflies, wing colour patterns have been extensively studied but diversity in wing shape and size is less well unders...
Preprint
Full-text available
Phenotypic divergence between closely related species has long interested biologists. Taxa that inhabit a range of environments and have known and diverse, natural histories, can help understand how different selection pressures shape diverging traits. In butterflies, wing colour patterns have been extensively studied, whereas wing shape diversity...
Article
Full-text available
Mating behavior between recently diverged species in secondary contact can impede or promote reproductive isolation. Traditionally, researchers focus on the importance of female mate choice and male‐male competition in maintaining or eroding species barriers. Although female‐female competition is widespread, little is known about its role in the sp...
Article
While gene flow can reduce the potential for local adaptation, hybridization may conversely provide genetic variation that increases the potential for local adaptation. Hybridization may also affect adaptation through altering sexual dimorphism and sexual conflict, but this remains largely unstudied. Here, we discuss how hybridization may affect se...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptive radiation research typically relies on the study of evolution in retrospective, leaving the predictive value of the concept hard to evaluate. Several radiations, including the cichlid fishes in the East African Great Lakes, have been studied extensively, yet no study has investigated the onset of the intraspecific processes of niche expans...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic linkage maps are essential for comparative genomics, high quality genome sequence assembly and fine scale quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. In the present study we identified and genotyped markers via restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing and constructed a genetic linkage map based on 1,597 SNP markers of an interspecific F...
Preprint
Full-text available
While gene flow can reduce the potential for local adaptation, hybridization may conversely provide genetic variation that increases the potential for local adaptation. Hybridization may also affect adaptation through altering sexual dimorphism and sexual conflict, but this remains largely unstudied. Here, we discuss how hybridization may affect se...
Article
Full-text available
The genetic basis of parallel evolution of similar species is of great interest in evolutionary biology. In the adaptive radiation of Lake Victoria cichlid fishes, sister species with either blue or red-back male nuptial coloration have evolved repeatedly, often associated with shallower and deeper water, respectively. One such case are blue and re...
Preprint
Full-text available
Genetic linkage maps are essential for comparative genomics, high quality genome sequence assembly and fine scale quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. In the present study we identified and genotyped markers via restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing and constructed a genetic linkage map based on 1,597 SNP markers of an interspecific F...
Data
Supplementary Figures, Supplementary Tables, Supplementary Discussion, Supplementary Methods and Supplementary References
Data
Groups, missing data proportions and number of polymorphic sites.
Data
Ancestry informative SNPs at the LWS opsin gene.
Article
Full-text available
Ecological speciation is the evolution of reproductive isolation as a consequence of direct divergent natural selection or ecologically mediated divergent sexual selection. While the genomic signature of the former has been extensively studied in recent years, only few examples exist for genomic differentiation where environment-dependent sexual se...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological speciation is the process by which reproductively isolated populations emerge as a consequence of divergent natural or ecologically-mediated sexual selection. Most genomic studies of ecological speciation have investigated allopatric populations, making it difficult to infer reproductive isolation. The few studies on sympatric ecotypes h...
Article
Speciation is a fundamental evolutionary process, the knowledge of which is crucial for understanding the origins of biodiversity. Genomic approaches are an increasingly important aspect of this research field. We review current understanding of genome-wide effects of accumulating reproductive isolation and of genomic properties that influence the...

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