Joan L. Florsheim

Joan L. Florsheim
University of California, Santa Barbara | UCSB · Earth Research Institute

PhD

About

46
Publications
5,181
Reads
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1,433
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Introduction
Joan L. Florsheim is a Researcher at the Earth Research Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara.

Publications

Publications (46)
Chapter
Wildfire plays a fundamental role in landscape evolution and the hydrologic and sediment regimes of the fluvial system. Wildfire accelerates rock weathering and alters hillslope soil properties, influencing infiltration, runoff, fluvial hydrology, hillslope and channel erosion, transport, and sedimentation. Morphodynamics and riparian habitat are c...
Article
Full-text available
Detailed study of the response of step-pool mountain channels to wildfire is rare despite increasing vulnerability of these systems. This paper reports the initial biogeomorphic response of step-pool streams to storms following the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire, Colo-rado, USA. Field surveys, benthic macroin-vertebrate sampling, and light detection and ra...
Article
Full-text available
Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) methods, such as ground-based Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), have enabled collection of high-resolution point clouds of elevation data to calculate changes in fluvial systems after disturbance, but are often accompanied by uncertainty and errors. This paper reviews and compares TLS analysis methods and develop...
Book
Floodplains provides an overview of floodplains and their management in temperate regions. It synthesizes decades of research on floodplain ecosystems, explaining hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological processes and how under appropriate management these processes can provide benefits to society ranging from healthy fish populations to flood-risk r...
Article
Current global warming projections suggest a possible increase in wildfire and drought, augmenting the need to understand how drought following wildfire affects the recovery of stream channels in relation to sediment dynamics. We investigated post-wildfire geomorphic responses caused by storms during a prolonged drought following the 2013 Springs F...
Article
Full-text available
As human interactions with Earth systems continue to intensify, understanding the complex relationships among human activity, landscape change, and societal responses to those changes becomes increasingly important. Interdisciplinary research centered on the theme of “feedbacks” in human-landscape systems serves as a promising focus for unraveling...
Article
An experimental field study was performed to investigate riverbed clogging processes and associated monitoring approaches near a dam-controlled riverbank filtration facility in Northern California. Motivated by previous studies at the site that indicated riverbed clogging plays an important role in the performance of the riverbank filtration system...
Chapter
Potential biogeomorphic benefits from intentional levee breaks and weir overflow on the managed floodplain-river system of California's Sacramento and San Joaquin River watershed (Central Valley) are discussed here. Prior to the nineteenth century, the system was characterized by natural levees alongside complex multichanneled rivers and tributarie...
Article
Dry ravel, the transport of sediment by gravity, transfers material from steep hillslopes to valley bottoms during dry conditions. Following wildfire, dry ravel greatly increases in the absence of vegetation on hillslopes, thereby contributing to sediment supply at the landscape scale. Dry ravel has been documented as a dominant hillslope erosion m...
Article
Landslide area probability density function (PDF) statistics elucidate the landslide magnitude–frequency distribution in a small coastal watershed in central California. Detailed mapping into a GIS and compilation of two slide inventories in Walker Creek, Marin County, reflect erosional effects of storms occurring in 1941 and 1998, respectively. We...
Article
This article identifies key questions and challenges for geomorphologists in investigating coupled feedbacks in human-landscape systems. While feedbacks occur in the absence of human influences, they are also altered by human activity. Feedbacks are a key element to understanding human-influenced geomorphic systems in ways that extend our tradition...
Article
Small dams are often situated on low-order tributaries that drain grazed hill-slopes in dry regions of the western United States. In this paper, we use remote-sensing techniques in a case study to explore the effects of multiple small stock-pond dams on tributaries to Chileno Creek, a coastal watershed in central California. Dam density, or number...
Conference Paper
Vigorous channel bank ecotones include dynamic biogeomorphic features such as a variable topographic surface that reflects patterns of erosion and sedimentation, established riparian vegetation of diverse ages and species, and woody debris. Together these elements create habitat that is subject to exogenous perturbations such as episodic floods or...
Article
Full-text available
The spatial and temporal variability of sediment sources, storage, and transport were investigated in a small agricultural watershed draining the Coast Ranges and Sacramento Valley in central California. Results of field, laboratory, and historical data analysis in the Willow Slough fluvial system document changes that transformed a transport-limit...
Article
Removal of infrastructure such as dams, levees, and erosion control structures is a promising approach toward restoring river system connectivity, processes, and ecology. Significant management challenges exist, however, related to removal of such structures that have already transformed riparian processes or societal perceptions. Here, we consider...
Article
Full-text available
Geomorphic processes influence flood hazards in the lowland fluvial-tidal transition area near the Cosumnes River-Dry Creek-Mokelumne River Confluence, Central Valley, California. Anthropogenic changes in the inherently flood-prone floodplain, flood basin, and Delta Island landscape increase flood hazards. Levee construction and flow regulation inf...
Article
Bank erosion is integral to the functioning of river ecosystems. It is a geomorphic process that promotes riparian vegetation succession and creates dynamic habitats crucial for aquatic and riparian plants and animals. River managers and policymakers, however, generally regard bank erosion as a process to be halted or minimized in order to create l...
Article
Watershed land uses, including urbanization, influence erosion and depositional processes in a tributary to the Navarro basin in north coastal California. The Robinson Creek subwatershed is deeply incised into easily erodible Quaternary alluvial river and terrace valley-fill deposits in the vicinity of the urbanizing town of Boonville. Remnant ripa...
Article
Full-text available
Even in heavily engineered river systems, climate still governs flood variability and thus still drives many levee breaks and geomorphic changes. We assemble a 155-year record of levee breaks for a major California river system to find that breaks occurred in 25% of years during the 20th Century. A relation between levee breaks and river discharge...
Article
Full-text available
Climate over the watershed of the San Francisco Bay Delta estuary system varies on a wide range of space and time scales, and affects downstream estuarine ecosystems. The historical climate has included mild to severe droughts and torrential rains accompanied by flooding, providing important lessons for present-day resource managers. Paleoclimate r...
Article
The San Francisco Bay-Delta system includes a watershed that covers a large area of California and provides water to two-thirds of the State's population. Climate over the estuary and its watershed in the dry summer months is controlled by the subtropical high which dominates and deflects storms from California. The subtropical high weakens and mig...
Article
The state of the science of lowland river floodplain restoration reflects the relatively new and experimental nature of large river floodplain rehabilitation efforts. Based on results of a case study of floodplain restoration at the lowland Cosumnes River, California, we present a geomorphic monitoring and adaptive assessment framework that address...
Conference Paper
Several of northern California's coastal watersheds have been listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as requiring the development of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for non-point source pollution. One such case is the Navarro River watershed located in southern Mendocino County. The Navarro River was listed under the federal Clean Wat...
Article
Side-valley tributary fans within the main axial valley river floodplain system are integral components of the sediment assemblage characterizing floodplains in the high-energy Navarro River basin, California. Laboratory analyses of subsurface core and auger samples from four study sites reveal that sediment-size distributions within the floodplain...
Article
Global warming and attendant sea-level rise may soon impact geomorphic processes in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River and San Francisco Bay Delta systems. During the past two centuries, dramatic anthropogenic changes in sediment supply and pervasive structural controls on rivers and floodplains have altered geomorphic responses to floods throughout...
Article
During the late Holocene, sediment deposition on the lowland Cosumnes River floodplain, CA has depended on factors that varied temporally and spatially, such as basin subsidence, sea level rise, flow, and sediment supply from both the Sacramento River system and from the Cosumnes River system itself, and anthropogenic changes. Through field investi...
Article
Full-text available
Downstream fining in the Cosumnes River is partially controlled by longitudinal variation in sediment mobility linked to changes in cross-sectional morphology. Strong fining occurs where the channel is self-formed with section-averaged bankfull dimensionless shear stress () near the threshold of motion (ca. 0.031), allowing for size-selective * t t...
Article
Analysis of hyperspectral data is a particularly novel approach to investigation of the relation between anthropogenic and natural disturbances, geomorphic responses, and ecosystem patterns at the watershed scale. During July 2000, hyperspectral imagery was collected for the Navarro basin (820km2) using the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectro...
Article
Restoration of sustainable geomorphic processes that create floodplain topography through development of sand-splay complexes at intentional breaches is one method to promote variability in physical structure needed for habitat restoration. The topography of splay complexes provides a range of floodplain elevations that creates local variability in...
Article
Engineered levee breaches on the lower Cosumnes River, Central California, create hydrologic and geomorphic conditions necessary to construct dynamic sand splay complexes on the floodplain. Sand splay complexes are composed of a network of main and secondary distributary channels that transport sediment during floods. The main channel is bounded by...
Article
Floodplain fans, sediment deposited at mouths of small tributaries at the hillslope-floodplain transition, are an integral component of the sedimentary deposits that form floodplains in high energy fluvial systems, such as the Navarro basin in north coastal California. Detailed field surveys and laboratory analysis of sediment cores reveal that the...
Article
Managed baselevel lowering in tributaries that emerge from small canyons onto forested floodplains affects floodplain and fan sediment storage and small ephemeral tributary channel morphology in the Navarro River basin, Mendocino Country, California, USA. Numerous small tributaries (drainage areas up to several square kilometres) flow through culve...
Article
Managed baselevel lowering in tributaries that emerge from small canyons onto forested floodplains affects floodplain and fan sediment storage and small ephemeral tributary channel morphology in the Navarro River basin, Mendocino Country, California, USA. Numerous small tributaries (drainage areas up to several square kilometres) flow through culve...
Article
Hydraulic modelling of a riffle-pool-riffle sequence in a straight reach of Dry Creek near Winters, California, indicates that while at low flow the mean (section average) velocity at riffles exceeds that of an adjacent pool, during high flow the mean velocity of the pool exceeds that of adjacent riffles. This supports the velocity-reversal hypothe...
Article
A reduction in particle size and critical shear stress associated with deposition of small gravel following the fire allowed moderate-magnitude flows to transport large volumes of sediment. Deposits of two debris flows give dates of 1045±95 yr BP for the older deposit and between 295±35 and 383±84 yr BP for the younger deposit. These dates indicate...
Article
A study on sediment transport and channel change was conducted on Zayante Creek and the lower San Lorenzo River in Santa Cruz County, California. A rainstorm with a recurrence interval locally in excess of 150 years occurred during the study year, 1982 WY. Stream surveys indicated that significant aggradation occurred during and after the peak floo...
Article
Full-text available
After the Wheeler Fire in southern Califor- nia in July 1985, we monitored sediment deposition and vegetation recovery in a section of the severely burned chaparral riparian zone of the North Fork of Matilija Creek, near Ojai, California. Increased runoff was ac- companied by low magnitude debris flows and fluvial transport of gravel, most of which...
Article
Since the early 1900s, the cumulative impacts of land-use and river-management practices on flow and sediment supply caused incision of a 32-kilometer, lowland portion of the Cosumnes River, Central Valley, California. One consequence of incision was the exhumation and erosion of resistant duripan layers in some reaches. The introduction of this su...
Article
Thesis (M.S.)--Humboldt State University, 1985. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 56-58). Typescript (photocopy).