Joachim Whaley

Joachim Whaley
University of Cambridge | Cam · Faculty of History

MA, PhD, LittD

About

376
Publications
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Introduction
Joachim Whaley is Professor of German History and Thought at the University of Cambridge. Joachim does research in History of Religion, Cultural History, the History of History and German History and Thought from 1500 to the present. He is the author of Germany and the Holy Roman Empire 1493-1806, 2 vols (Oxford 2012). His most recent book is short history of the Holy Roman Empire from Charlemagne to 1806: The Holy Roman Empire. A Very Short Introduction (OUP, July 2018).

Publications

Publications (376)
Book
The development of European peace processes is as characteristic of early modernity as the ubiquity of military conflict: over 2,000 international or domestic peace treaties were concluded in this era. This handbook presents the most recent findings of international research on political and societal peace orders, peace concepts and practices, alon...
Article
Topographies of Tolerance and Intolerance: Responses to Religious Pluralism in Reformation Europe. Marjorie Elizabeth Plummer and Victoria Christman, eds. Studies in Central European Histories 64. Leiden: Brill, 2018. x + 268 pp. $137. - Volume 73 Issue 1 - Joachim Whaley
Article
Full-text available
Helmuth Plessner’s The Delayed Nation was a key text in the Sonderweg narrative that dominated the writing of German history from the later 1950s to the mid-1980s: the idea that the disaster of the Third Reich and the Holocaust could be explained in terms of Germany’s problematic path to modernity since the Middle Ages. The book had originally been...
Chapter
The Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation was founded in 800 with the coronation of Charlemagne as emperor by the pope, and was dissolved in 1806. ‘What was the Holy Roman Empire?’ explains that the original Frankish kingdom was a tribal society that followed an elected leader. On this foundation subsequent ruling dynasties developed what became a...
Chapter
‘The legacy of the Holy Roman Empire’ describes the region’s history after 1806. The empire’s dissolution in 1806 effectively partitioned its territory into four zones. Would ‘Germany’ ever be united again? Napoleon’s defeat by the Austrians is discussed along with the creation of the German Confederation, the failure of the Frankfurt Parliament, t...
Chapter
‘The early modern empire (1): from Maximilian I to the Thirty Years War’ outlines the period from 1493 to 1648. Maximilian I’s reign (1493–1519) transformed the empire. It remained a feudal society, in which the princes owed allegiance to the emperor, but it now gained more elements of a written constitution. Subsequently, the empire acquired a mor...
Chapter
After the post-Hohenstaufen era, two decades of weak kings were followed by several dynasties competing for the German crown before the Habsburgs emerged dominant in the 15th century. During this period, the German kingdom evolved constitutional structures that institutionalized the elective monarchy. The most important was the establishment of a f...
Chapter
‘Roman Empire and German kingdom: from Charlemagne to the Ottonians’ describes the period of time after the decline of the Roman Empire and the establishment of the Germanic tribes of the Franks on its north-western periphery through to the reign of Henry of Bavaria, whose death in 1024 ended the Ottonian dynasty. Charlemagne’s reign and the Caroli...
Chapter
‘The high medieval empire: from the Salians to the Hohenstaufen’ describes the Salian and Hohenstaufen dynasties who ruled until the mid-13th century; the increasingly problematic relationship between empire and papacy; and the development of a German identity. It begins with the early Salian kings, Conrad II (r. 1024–39) and Henry III (r. 1039–56)...
Chapter
The Thirty Years War was a disaster for much of the empire, yet the post-war era provided new opportunities and developments, which all contributed to the extraordinary cultural vitality of the German lands, manifest especially in the literary, musical, and philosophical achievements of the 18th and early 19th centuries. ‘The early modern empire (2...
Article
Central European History (CEH) began to appear at a crucial juncture in the historiography of the Holy Roman Empire. Of course its remit was much broader. Founded sixteen years before the British journal German History , Central European History , together with the Austrian History Yearbook (founded in 1965) and the East European Quarterly (founded...
Data
From ‘Aachen, Battle of (September 13 – October 21, 1944)’ to ‘Zweibrücken, Christian von (1752–1817)’, the coverage of this reference work on German military history edited by David T. Zabecki is extraordinary. Over a thousand entries written by 245 contributors cover a total of 39 wars, 145 distinct campaigns, 257 separate battles, and 344 indivi...
Article
The article challenges Jonathan Israel's assertion that there was a single 'true' Enlightenment with no national variations and re-examines the case of the German Aufklärung and its reception. German perceptions of Enlightenment in the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries were largely negative and inhibited new research for som...

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