Joachim Pander

Joachim Pander
Technische Universität München | TUM · School of Life Sciences Weihenstephan

Dr. rer. nat.

About

70
Publications
16,810
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Introduction
Joachim Pander currently works at the Aquatic Systems Biology Unit, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Technische Universität München. .

Publications

Publications (70)
Article
Floodplains were extensively altered by anthropogenic activities, resulting in modified flow dynamics essential for maintaining diverse riverine communities. There is growing interest in restoring environmental flows by artificially modulating discharge as a potential management option in regulated rivers. In the context of a large floodplain resto...
Article
Full-text available
Hydropower is considered an important form of renewable energy, often involving hydropeaking. While the effects of hydropeaking on aquatic communities in areas downstream the dam are well understood, there is a lack of studies investigating potential impacts on tributaries located further upstream. In this study, we tested the effects of hydropeaki...
Article
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Hydropower use of rivers can exert multiple effects on aquatic species and habitats. Due to limitations of conservation projects in the main channels of hydropower-affected rivers, there has been an increasing focus on tributaries, side channels, and fish passes as target areas for conservation and restoration. However, some of these side channels...
Chapter
Although the costs of fish-related mitigation measures can play an important role in the adoption of mitigation measures, there is relatively little information about this aspect. This chapter presents an overview of the range of costs for different mitigation measures and compares their magnitudes. As many mitigation measures are adopted in combin...
Chapter
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This chapter very briefly outlines site and constellation specific direct and indirect impacts of a hydropower scheme primarily on fishes. It describes potential effects of single elements of a hydropower scheme, such as available migration routes up- and downstream, impoundment, hydraulic head, turbine type and mode of operation. It summarises the...
Article
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In context of transitioning towards renewable energy, hydroelectricity has gained global relevance. However, hydropower plants have severe impacts on aquatic habitat and biota: Dams disrupt migration routes of diad-romous and potamodromous fish species, degrade the hydro-morphology of streams and turbines cause high mortalities in fishes. To suppor...
Article
Resolving the controversy about hydropower is only possible based on reliable data on its ecological effects, particularly fish welfare. Herein, we propose a comprehensive assessment of conventional and innovative hydropower using a data set of 52 250 fish. The effects of hydropower on fish were most harmful at sites with Kaplan turbines, showing ≤...
Article
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An increase in river water temperatures is being detected worldwide, with some predictions of an up to 4°C rise by 2050. Such stream temperature increase is likely to affect aquatic communities, with predicted declines and range shifts of cold stenothermic species and a facilitated dispersal and population development in temperature-tolerant specie...
Chapter
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Assessments of aquatic ecosystem health rely increasingly on biological indicators such as fish community structure, but national approaches differ. To use bioindicators efficiently and to allow cross-country comparisons, standardized tools and methods are required. Within this study, currently applied procedures for stream ecosystem assessment in...
Article
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Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. and brown trout Salmo trutta fario L. are species of high socio-economic and ecological value. Declining populations make them target species of fisheries management. This paper reviews the direct effects of deficient longitudinal connectivity, changes in discharge, high water temperatures, oxygen depletion, changes i...
Article
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Management of biological invasions strongly depends on early and accurate detection of non-native species, yet species identification is often complicated for various reasons. One prominent example relates to the controversy about the genetic specimen assignment of Asian and Oriental weatherfish species introduced into Europe. Weatherfishes, compri...
Article
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• Fish larval drift is an essential step in the life cycle of riverine fish species as it determines dispersal and colonisation. Anthropogenic flow alterations and interruption of longitudinal and lateral connectivity by river damming and straightening can severely affect larval drift patterns. In this study, we characterised spatio-temporal drift...
Article
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Bank habitats provide important functions for riverine fish. Yet, they have been heavily modified by land use, technical flood protection measures, and hydropower installations. Fish species requiring specific habitats to complete their life cycle have strongly declined and therefore become target species of river restoration measures. This study c...
Article
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Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been widely used to describe interspecific differences in egg quality of teleost freshwater fish, but potential intraspecific differences are poorly studied. Eggs of many rheophilic cyprinids are covered with adhesive structures such as attaching villi facilitating egg attachment at substrates of spawning grou...
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Increased deposition of fine sediments in rivers and streams affects a range of key ecosystem processes across the sediment-water interface, and it is a critical aspect of river habitat degradation and restoration. Understanding the mechanisms leading to fine sediment accumulation along and across streambeds and their effect on ecological processes...
Poster
Full-text available
Increased deposition of fine sediments in streams affects a range of key ecosystem processes across the sediment-water interface, and it is a critical aspect of river habitat degradation and restoration. Understanding the mechanisms leading to fine sediment accumulation along and across streambeds, and their affectation to ecological processes is t...
Article
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Fish passes facilitate fish movement in fragmented river systems, yet they can also provide important habitat functions. This study investigated the fish community composition of different constructed habitat types (fluvial habitats, floodplain ponds) within fish passes in relation to habitat characteristics in order to deduce recommendations for f...
Article
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Understanding stream thermal heterogeneity patterns is crucial to assess and manage river resilience in light of climate change. The dual acquisition of high-resolution thermal infrared (TIR) and red–green–blue-band (RGB) imagery from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) allows for the identification and characterization of thermally differentiated patc...
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Monitoring of fish passage at hydropower plants largely relies on stow-fyke-net captures installed downstream of turbine outlets, yet little is known about which fish behavior contributes to reduced catch efficiency. We studied fish-net interactions as well as biological and physical factors potentially influencing behavior in three experiments: (i...
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To promote the sustainable management of hydropower, decision makers require information about cost trade-offs between the restoration of fish passage and hydropower production. We provide a systematic overview of the construction, operational, monitoring, and power loss costs associated with upstream and downstream fish passage measures in the Eur...
Article
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• Spawning substrate quality is a major factor influencing the early ontogeny of European nase (Chondrostoma nasus), a target species of conservation. • Analogous to findings from salmonids, restoration of spawning grounds was hypothesized to enhance spawning, development and thus recruitment success of nase, by improving the substrate quality, and...
Article
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The forecast of warmer weather, and reduced precipitation and streamflow under climate change makes freshwater biota particularly vulnerable to being exposed to temperature extremes. Given the importance of temperature to regulate vital physiological processes, the availability of discrete cold-water patches (CWPs) in rivers to act as potential the...
Article
Fishes in European rivers are threatened by manifold stressors such as structural degradation, water pollution, overexploitation, land-use changes in the catchment, invasive species and global processes including climate change. Identifying main stressors in a stream/river system is of utterly importance for efficiently utilizing the scarce funds f...
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In contrast to the efforts made to develop functioning fishways for upstream migrants, the need for effective downstream migration facilities has long been underestimated. The challenge of developing well-performing bypasses for downstream migrants involves attracting the fish to the entrance and transporting them quickly and unharmed into the tail...
Article
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Modeling of fish population developments in the context of hydropower impacts and restoration planning requires autecological information on critical life stages (especially on juvenile stages and reproduction). We compiled and examined the current data availability in peer-reviewed and grey literature on autecological requirements of ten rheophili...
Article
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European nase (Chondrostoma nasus) is a specialist riverine fish, characterised by a complex life cycle making it vulnerable to habitat degradation. Recent findings indicate that, analogously to salmonids, the interstitial zone quality may pose a serious bottleneck for successful recruitment of this species. In this study, nase eggs were exposed to...
Article
Dyke-based pumping stations have been linked with high fish mortalities during pumping events. Behavioural barriers like electric fish fences have been proposed as a promising solution to prevent entrainment of fish into pumps. In order to test the effectiveness of such barriers, the intake of a pumping station was equipped with a new generation el...
Article
Hydropower structures hinder the movement and migration of fishes, impairing their life cycles. Additionally, downstream moving fish are often at risk of being injured during turbine passage. To improve hydropower production towards more fish‐friendly techniques and management, knowledge on timing and extent of natural patterns of fish downstream m...
Article
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Many rivers in Central Europe are heavily affected by increased sedimentation due to erosion from agricultural land. High fine sediment loads can clog the interstitial system, increase turbidity, limit light penetration and potentially reduce primary productivity with negative impacts on stream biota such as reduced abundance and diversity. In this...
Article
Intensification of catchment land-use and the corresponding habitat degradation pose a threat to freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem health, yet few studies comprehensively quantified the effects of specific land-use variables on fish communities for different catchments within the same climatic region. Herein, we investigated the influence of ca...
Article
Monitoring of fish movement is important in understanding and optimising the functionality of fishways and in restoring riverine connectivity. This study compared fish monitoring data (ARIS sonar-based and GoPro camera-based), with catches in a multi-mesh stow net following downstream passage in a small river in Bavaria, Germany. In terms of the nu...
Article
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Despite of structural deficits, highly modified water bodies (HMWB) contain remnant populations of endangered fish that have high conservation value. Restoration in HMWBs underlies different principles when compared to natural rivers because of impaired river dynamic processes. The objective herein was to assess the contribution of restored habitat...
Article
Freshwater fishes are among the most threatened groups of vertebrates, with 39% of all European fish species facing extinction. Herein, we provide a comprehensive analyses of historical data as well as fish monitoring data from 1989 through 2013 from Bavaria, Germany. The results of this study indicate that the most pronounced species-turnover alre...
Conference Paper
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With the forecast of continued durations of warmer weather, reduced precipitation and stream flow under climate change, freshwater systems have been highlighted as particularly vulnerable ecosystems. Aquatic organisms have been identified to seek thermal refuge in areas of water, which are persistently cooler than the surrounding river and provide...
Article
Rheophilic cyprinid populations are in decline in many European rivers and have become target species of conservation and river restoration. This is especially true for the European nase (Chondrostoma nasus), a lithophilic species for which the early life stages pose the first bottlenecks in successful population development. In this study, egg dis...
Article
Knowing the kinds of physical stress experienced by fish passing through hydropower turbines can help optimise technologies and improve fish passage. This paper assesses the hydraulic conditions experienced through three different low-head turbines (a very low head (VLH), Archimedes screw and horizontal Kaplan turbine), taken using an autonomous se...
Article
Pumping of water during floods from hinterland drainage systems into the main river poses a health risk to fishes and comparative studies are crucial to identify the most fish-friendly pump designs and operations. We investigated the effects on fish health of pump passages through four conventional and one 'fish-friendly' pump. All pump types cause...
Article
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Hydropower-related damage to fish remains a great challenge, making objective monitoring of turbine-related fish injury a necessity. The catch of fish at turbine outlets is currently realised by net fishing, but potential catch-related injuries are largely unknown. Catch efficiency and fish-friendliness in relation to fish handling, exposure time,...
Article
Floodplains have been strongly altered by human activities such as channelization and other river regulations. Globally, there is a growing interest in their restoration because of an increasing understanding of the ecological importance of these habitats for feeding, spawning, nursery or overwintering of aquatic species. In this study, a large flo...
Article
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Hydropower plants have been linked with high mortality and passage impairments during Silver Eel (Anguilla anguilla) downstream migration, but there is still a lack of effective and economically viable management options for safe power plant passage. This study used an Adaptive Resolution Imaging Sonar (ARIS) to investigate how undershot sluice gat...
Article
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The Oriental Weatherfish is considered a globally invasive fish species. In Europe, several reported feral populations of Oriental Weatherfish display an overlapping distribution range with native weatherfish Misgurnus fossilis, a declining species of international conservation and aquatic management concern. Morphologically distinguishing the diff...
Article
This study compares the effectiveness and representativeness of electrofishing, snorkelling, seining, baited lift netting, multi-mesh gillnetting, baited fish traps, fyke netting, angling and longline fishing, considering three typical lentic flood-plain habitats at different times of day. Electrofishing was by far the most effective method yieldin...
Article
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Knowledge on the extent and mechanisms of fish damage caused by hydropower facilities is important for their ecological improvement. Herein, a novel field-based fish injury assessment protocol is proposed that includes vitality and four general health criteria, as well as nine lethal and sub-lethal injury types across 18 body parts. The protocol wa...
Article
Heavily modified water bodies (HMWB) are characterized by monotonous and straightened channel morphologies with high degrees of bank enforcement. They often lack shallow bank habitats, which are considered important for critical life stages of fishes. In this study, three principle options to engineer shallow stream zones were assessed concerning t...
Article
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Modification of streams and rivers has mediated range expansions of several species into areas beyond their natural distribution. In this study, a newly created secondary floodplain channel (SFC), with three connections to the Danube, was used as a model system to compare colonisation by indigenous versus non-indigenous species of macroinvertebrate...
Article
The hyporheic interstitial provides habitat for many different organisms − from bacteria to burrowing invertebrates. Due to their burrowing and sediment reworking behaviour, these ecosystem engineers have the potential to affect hyporheic processes such as respiration and nutrient cycling. However, there is a lack of studies that characterize the i...
Article
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Background The integrative assessment of responses to environmental disturbance simultaneously considering multiple taxonomic groups or guilds has become increasingly important in ecological monitoring. The most common solution to combine data of different taxonomic groups is the calculation of compound indices comprising several individual indica...
Article
Stream restoration is widely applied for conservation of freshwater ecosystems, but systematic comparisons on the effects of different techniques are rare. In this study, we systematically evaluated two types of gravel introduction, substratum raking and the placement of boulders in six streams. We compared indicator-based and multi-scale approache...
Article
Stream substratum plays a key role for many riverine species and has become a focus topic in the context of structural habitat improvements. There is a lack of studies that compare the effectiveness of different substratum restoration measures. Herein, we compare four restoration techniques (two different gravel introductions, substratum raking and...
Conference Paper
Most of the world’s rivers are affected by dams and weirs, which results in modifications of serial continuity and declines of riverine fish species. Information on the quantitative and qualitative effects of weirs as well as on the efficiency of restoration measures is crucial for successful management of stream ecosystems. We developed and tested...
Conference Paper
Water and stream substratum quality are key factors influencing the composition of aquatic communities. Particularly, stocks of salmonid fishes are in decline and their recruitment rates are strongly dependent on water and substratum quality. In this contribution, two toolboxes for active bioindication of water and substratum quality in streams are...
Article
Full-text available
Taxonomic sufficiency (TS) has been proposed for assessing community composition and environmental impacts as a way to balance the need to indicate the biology of the organisms present with time and effort needed for species identification. TS has been applied most often to marine and freshwater macroinvertebrates, but tests of its usefulness are l...
Article
Exploitation of freshwater resources is essential for sustenance of human existence and alteration of rivers, lakes and wetlands has facilitated economic development for centuries. Consequently, freshwater biodiversity is critically threatened, with stream ecosystems being the most heavily affected. To improve the status of freshwater habitats, e.g...
Article
In this study, a comparison of point abundance sampling (PAS) electrofishing, angling with two different hook sizes and trap-based fishing was performed in a non-wadeable river to analyse their effects on catch per unit effort (CPUE) and population characteristics of invasive round goby Neogobius melanostomus. PAS electrofishing was identified as t...
Article
The introduction of weirs into stream ecosystems resulted in modifications of serial continuity and in the decline of riverine fish species. Successful river restoration requires information on the ecological functionality of fish bypass channels that are considered an ecological improvement according to the European Water Framework Directive. In t...
Data
Exploitation of freshwater resources is essential for sustenance of human existence and alteration of rivers, lakes and wetlands has facilitated economic development for centuries. Consequently, freshwater biodiversity is critically threatened, with stream ecosystems being the most heavily affected. To improve the status of freshwater habitats, e.g...
Article
Full-text available
Like most European rivers, the Upper Danube has been embanked and straightened, and hydropower plants have been built on it since the 19 th century. The river and fl oodplain became disconnected, the hydromorpho-logy changed dramatically and the typical fl oodplain habitats, such as softwood and hardwood riparian forests, have been suffering. The p...
Article
Summary1. Most of the world’s rivers are affected by dams and weirs. Information on the quantitative and qualitative effects of weirs across biological communities is crucial for successful management and restoration of stream ecosystems. Yet, there is a lack of comprehensive studies that have analysed the serial discontinuity in direct proximity o...
Poster
Water quality and stream substratum quality are key factors influencing the survival of aquatic communities. Particularly the stocks of salmonid fish and freshwater pearl mussels which depend heavily on highest water and stream substratum quality are still declining. As a first step of population restoration efforts the assessment of water quality...
Article
The salmonid-egg floating box provides an easy bioindication tool for an assessment of water quality, as demonstrated here for the reintroduction of Europe's largest salmonid species, the huchen Hucho hucho.
Article
Pander J, Geist J. Seasonal and spatial bank habitat use by fish in highly altered rivers – a comparison of four different restoration measures. Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2010: 19: 127–138. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S Abstract – River regulations have resulted in substantial modifications of the characteristics and the diversity of stream ecosyst...
Poster
Four different bank habitats in a heavily modified water body were restored and checked for their functionality as fish habitat. Special focus was given on the habitat improvement for target species such as Chondrostoma nasus and Barbs barbus.
Article
This paper describes the development of the 'egg sandwich', a system for assessing stream substratum quality by linking measurements of depth-specific salmonid egg hatching success and physico-chemical water variables from the same sites within the interstitial zone.

Projects

Projects (7)
Project
Water and sediments interact at different spatial and temporal scales in freshwaters promoting the development of highly dynamic systems. Erosion, transport and sedimentation are vital processes that shape river morphology. These dynamic processes, in turn, are essential to provide a mosaic of diverse habitat patches for aquatic species and to freshwater ecosystems functioning. Anthropogenic activities such as flow regulations or dams lead to fragmentation and ecosystem degradation, interfering with natural hydro-morphodynamics and affecting aquatic ecology. In Europe, large efforts are set to restore disturbed river sections to meet the goals of a good ecological status, set by the Water Framework Directive. Experience to date indicates that integrating both physical and ecological processes in river restoration efforts is critical to freshwater ecosystems conservation. In this context, the interdisciplinary field of Ecohydraulics represents the link between abiotic components (e.g. hydrology, hydraulics, geomorphology) and riverine biota (e.g. vegetation, fish, macroinvertebrates). Advances in this field of research are therefore paramount to make future management decisions in freshwater systems. This session aims at integrating the core research disciplines forming Ecohydraulics, from hydrology, hydraulics, fluvial geomorphology, and biology, but also social aspects to ensure a holistic assessment of rivers, lakes and reservoirs, and to enable the implementation of sustainable restoration measures. We welcome both fundamental and applied research, presenting approaches at different spatio-temporal scales. They may include holistic tools and methods to improve the assessment, prediction and management of restoration and mitigation measures in aquatic systems, with a focus on the hydrological, fluvial geomorphological, and biological interactions. Contributions may refer, but are not restricted, to: - sediment transport, fluvial dynamics and sediment budgets in rivers - risk analysis and mitigation in fluvial systems - reservoir sedimentation: processes and management - large wood and microplastic in aquatic systems - nature-compatible river engineering and river development - nature based solutions - revitalization of river systems (from successful studies to failures in restoration) - tools and methods (concepts, measurements, monitoring, modelling) to understand the interactions between fluvial processes and their biological responses Share: https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU21/session/39933 Conveners: Stefan Haun, Roser Casas-Mulet, Markus Noack and Lennart Schönfelder