Jo Ingold

Jo Ingold
Deakin University · Department of Management

PhD

About

37
Publications
4,775
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263
Citations

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Full-text available
Local state and third sector actors routinely provide support to help people navigate their right to social security and mediate their chequered relationship to it. COVID‐19 has not only underlined the significance of these actors in the claims‐making process, but also just how vulnerable those working within ‘local ecosystems of support’ are to ex...
Article
Full-text available
This article locates the emergence of new thinking on the left around work, age and assets within the lineage of ‘class composition’ analysis arising from the autonomist movement in mid-twentieth century Italy. With reference to contemporary debates around electoral and political strategy within the Labour Party, the article critically appraises th...
Article
Full-text available
Active labour market policies (ALMPs) have evolved as pivotal social policy instruments designed to place the unemployed and other disadvantaged groups in sustainable employment. Yet, little is known about what drives employer participation in such initiatives. This article provides a nuanced account of the socio-economic aspects of the demand-side...
Article
Organisations engaged in benefits, employment and crisis support play an important role in the lives of claimants and those financially struggling in the UK today. In this report, we answer two questions: what is the nature and extent of support received by benefit claimants? And how have benefits, employment and crisis support been affected by COV...
Article
Full-text available
This article places the Labour Party's present post-Corbyn renewal in the context of previous periods of renewal in the party's recent history, associating with the new leadership of Keir Starmer a potential to rediscover the strategic project of the pluralist 'soft' left as an alternative to the 'programmatic' character of the hard left. After ass...
Article
There has been much scrutiny of the British benefits system during COVID-19, and most experts agree that the benefits system has performed well, even if historic weaknesses remain. Yet little attention has been paid to those who start a claim that is ultimately not successful. This report focuses on these ‘unsuccessful claimants’, using new YouGov...
Article
This report presents the first findings from the Welfare at a (Social) Distance project to look at how far benefit claimants are connected to the world of work, helping to better understand the emerging picture from recent UK labour market statistics. In this report, we investigate a range of questions including, how many new claimants have a job?...
Article
Active labour market programmes (ALMPs) are critical preparation mechanisms to assist people to enter the workplace. This article analyses qualitative data from a hard-to-access group of individuals with mental health conditions (MHCs) participating in a large-scale UK ALMP, the Work Programme (WP). Using the lens of the ‘extended social model of d...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the under‐explored demand‐side of active labour market policies (ALMPs). Based on interview data from a comparative study of the UK and Denmark, the paper analyses employers' perspectives and experiences of ALMPs. In both countries, employers were favourably disposed towards employing unemployed jobseekers but held negative vi...
Article
The involvement (or engagement) of employers is critical to the success and effectiveness of active labour market programmes (ALMPs), yet little is known about how street‐level organizations (SLOs) delivering them interact with employers. This article draws on interviews with ‘employer engagement’ staff in SLOs contracted to deliver the UK's princi...
Article
Full-text available
This article draws on an original comparative survey of employers in the UK and Denmark to analyse the role of active labour market programmes (ALMPs) in employers' recruitment of disadvantaged groups. Using the framework of Bonet et al. to conceptualise agencies delivering ALMPs as labour market intermediaries (LMIs), the effect of ALMPs on employ...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report analyses and compares employer engagement in active labour market programmes (ALMPs) in the UK and Denmark. It presents findings from an original survey of over 1,500 employers, examining (i) the extent of employers’ participation in ALMPs in each country and the differences and similarities between them; (ii) the types and degrees of e...
Article
As part of its plan to get more people into work, the government is forging ahead with a pre-election pledge to double the current 15 hours per week of free childcare to 30 hours for working parents. Text available at: https://theconversation.com/focusing-free-childcare-on-working-parents-is-short-sighted-44623
Article
Full-text available
In 2011 the UK Coalition government introduced its flagship welfare-to-work programme, ‘The Work Programme’ (WP). Based on a ‘payment by results’ model, it aims to incentivise contracted providers to move participants into sustained employment. Employer involvement is central to the programme’s success and this paper explores the ‘two faces’ of thi...
Chapter
The aim of this chapter is to explore in the case of Denmark the influence of social dialogue on activation for disabled people, reflecting ongoing tensions in the context of recession. Specifically, the chapter (i) outlines the reforms of the 2000s, involving a more work first strategy for disabled people; (ii) analyses the devolution and municipa...
Chapter
Led by the disability movement’s concern with the employment choices faced by disabled people, this controversial book uses sociological and philosophical approaches, as well as international examples, to critically engage with possible alternatives to paid work for disabled people.
Chapter
Full-text available
Following Labour's significant reforms to childcare policy, under the Coalition there has been a combination of gains and losses for parents, with the implications of some impending changes not yet fully known. Ostensibly, more free childcare and early education offers an appealing solution and take-up of the universal entitlement is high. However,...
Article
This paper combines the evidence-based policy making and 'policy as translation' literatures to illuminate the process by which evidence from home or overseas contexts is incorporated into policy. Drawing upon focus groups with Department for Work and Pensions officials, a conceptual model of 'evidence translation' is introduced, comprising five ke...
Book
Full-text available
http://lubswww.leeds.ac.uk/fileadmin/webfiles/ceric/Documents/CERIC_Policy_Report_5.pdf
Article
In industrialized countries women have increasingly become a target group for active labour market policies, or ‘activation’. However, to date, the burgeoning literature on activation has tended to overlook its link with the highly gendered nature of welfare. This article presents the first comparative analysis of activation approaches for partnere...
Article
The increasing number of recipients of disability and long-term sickness benefits has resulted in the introduction of specific employability programmes in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries. In the UK Pathways to Work involved enabling and support measures for benefit recipients with long-term health conditions....

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Dear colleagues, We warmly invite you to submit papers to our special issue titled: Old norms in the new normal: Exploring and resisting the rise of the ideal pandemic worker in Gender, Work and Organization. More info can be found via https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14680432
Project
Generating knowledge on 1) employers' and organisations' experiences with hiring and sustainability placements of vulnerable groups of jobseekers (eg disabled persons); 2) the role of internal (eg HRM) and external (eg public service providers) support in motivating, stimulating and enabling employers' engagement; 3) experiences and support needs of SMEs; 4) the role of behavioural interventions in stimulating employer engagement in promoting the labour-market participation of vulnerable jobseekers.
Project
Analyses employer and engagement in employability and skills programmes in the UK and Denmark and develops a typology of employer engagement. Two research phases: 1. Survey of over 1,500 employers in both countries 2. Over 100 in-depth qualitative interviews with employers and 'providers' of employability and skills programmes in both countries