Jo-Hannah Plug

Jo-Hannah Plug
University of Liverpool | UoL · Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology

PhD Archaeology, University of Liverpool

About

6
Publications
1,395
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
19
Citations
Introduction
I am particularly interested in transdisciplinary approaches to the past in which evidence of funerary behaviour and human biographies are used in an integrated manner. Most recently, my Doctoral research project at the University of Liverpool has combined evidence relating to chronology, ritual behaviour, taphonomy, demographics, diet, and mobility to achieve a better understanding of cultural change and community structure at Neolithic Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - March 2020
University of Liverpool
Position
  • LDC development tutor
Description
  • Involved in the development and facilitation of workshops and webinars, including: “Taking Ownership of your PhD”, “Starting Out in the Research Environment”, “Time-management for PhD researchers”, and “Research Writing - Producing an Academic Document”.
October 2016 - present
University of Liverpool
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Graduate teaching fellow, involved in teaching “ALGY 356: Origins of Agriculture”, “ALGY 224: Death and Burial in The Neolithic Near East”, “ALGY 266: Human Osteology”, “ALGY101: Principles of Archaeology” and “ALGY102: Practice of Archaeology”.
September 2014 - September 2016
Leiden University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Research assistant for the research project “Consolidating Empire”, jointly responsible for the drafting and publication of the final report on the Late Bronze Age settlement of Tell Sabi Abyad I: stratigraphy and structures.

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Late Neolithic graves excavated at Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria, have been dated by radiocarbon. This series of 46 human bone dates represents a sequence of cemeteries that is analyzed by Bayesian methodology. The dates show continuous use of the northeastern slope of the mound as a burial ground throughout the Initial Pottery Neolithic to the Halaf peri...
Chapter
Full-text available
As items buried in a closed, ritual context, pottery selected as grave goods represent the only unequivocal depositions of intact pottery vessels identified so far at the Late Neolithic site of Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria. In the selection of pots as burial goods the Late Neolithic community of Tell Sabi Abyad adhered to more widely understood notions r...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial continuity of the house is often seen as crucial in providing temporal depth for the Neolithic societies of southwest Asia. While an emphasis on the creation of such continuities is evinced at densely agglomerated sites, other sites are characterised by dispersal and frequent relocation of habitation. Çatalhöyük (Turkey) and Tell Sabi Abyad...
Article
Full-text available
Late Neolithic graves excavated at Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria, have been dated by radiocarbon. This series of 46 human bone dates represents a sequence of cemeteries that is analyzed by Bayesian methodology. The dates show continuous use of the northeastern slope of the mound as a burial ground throughout the Initial Pottery Neolithic to the Halaf peri...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Hannah Plug is a Graduate Teaching Fellow at the University of Liverpool (Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology, School of Histories, Languages and Cultures). Her PhD research focuses on the burial record of Late Neolithic cemeteries of Tell Sabi Abyad, Syria, to achieve a better understanding of cultural change observed both locally and in the wider region. Supervisors: Professor Douglas Baird, University of Liverpool, Dr Jessica Pearson, University of Liverpool, Dr Eleni Asouti, University of Liverpool. Advisers: Professor Peter Akkermans, Leiden University , and Professor Hans van der Plicht, Center for Isotope Research, Groningen University.