J.M. Vergès

J.M. Vergès
IPHES Catalan Institute for Human Palaeoecology and Social Evolution | IPHES · Technology

About

171
Publications
55,291
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5,337
Citations
Citations since 2016
52 Research Items
3519 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500

Publications

Publications (171)
Chapter
El Mirador cave (Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos) is one of the most significant sites for understanding the evolution of agricultural and livestock farming groups on the Iberian Peninsula. Its long sequence spans from the Early Neolithic (second half of the 6th millennium cal BCE) to the Bronze Age (second half of the 2nd millennium cal BCE). During t...
Chapter
El Mirador cave has become a reference for the study of the economic, social organization and funerary behavior of first farming communities in the Iberian Peninsula. In this chapter we put into context the set of studies carried out to date and presented in this monographic volume. The Neolithic occupations of El Mirador cave are among the earlies...
Article
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Large, conglomerate caves in north-eastern Iberia have been significant places since the Neolithic through to historical times; however, their significance during the Palaeolithic has barely been explored. This project is the first systematic study of the use of these iconic geological landmarks among Pleistocene hunter-gatherers.
Poster
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ABSTRACT Neolithisation process arrived at the Iberian Peninsula (IP) around 5,500 calBC, having diverse impacts on genomic and cultural diversity. During the Late Neolithic–Chalcolithic, changes occurred at funerary and cultural material level, with also evidence of narrower exchange networks. Genomic diversity decrease at this period suggests hum...
Article
Full-text available
Neolithisation was a relatively fast process that affected both the interior and coastal zones of the Iberian Peninsula, but it was also a heterogeneous process that had diverse impacts on genomic and cultural diversity. In the Late Neolithic–Chalcolithic, a change in funerary practices, cultural material and trade networks occurred, and genomic he...
Article
Early husbandry practices that include herd management and the use of livestock areas such as sheepfold caves can be analysed in the context of different disciplines (e.g. zooarchaeology, micromorphology, and archaeobotany). In this study, a new and standard method for the determination of bile acids and steroidal hormones that incorporates microwa...
Article
Faecal matter is commonly recovered from archaeological sites related to human/animal activity. The identification of its source is essential to understand the domestication process and the relationship between humans and domestic animals in ancient times. Additionally, faecal matter is useful for determining the diet of animals. Therefore, the use...
Poster
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The poster shows the results of an experimental programme focused on macro and micro technical traces and how to detect possible residues on flakes and cores produced by knapping on anvil technique.
Presentation
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The video shows the results of an experimental programme focused to identify macro and micro technical traces and detect residues produced by knapping on anvil technique using several microscopes
Poster
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As we know the archaeological levels E and J of the La Cansaladeta site were studied systematically, in terms of refitting and horizontal spatial density analyses with the quantitative mapping methods. The previous study showed a small-scale Middle Pleistocene site can be analyzed without long-distance refit / conjoin connections. Even though our s...
Presentation
Full-text available
As we know the archaeological levels E and J of the La Cansaladeta site were studied systematically, in terms of refitting and horizontal spatial density analyses with the quantitative mapping methods. The previous study showed a small-scale Middle Pleistocene site can be analyzed without long-distance refit / conjoin connections. Even though our s...
Presentation
This study presents the second systematic refit / conjoin analysis of MIS 11 site La Cansaladeta (Tarragona, Spain). Previous study of the lithic assemblage of levels E and J in terms of cluster / density, orientation refit / conjoin connections and technological investigations obtained incredibly good spatial information. Though our research initi...
Article
Full-text available
In this manuscript, we present the first systematic refitting results of the small-scale Middle Pleistocene (MIS11) rock shelter site of La Cansaladeta. The lithic materials that have been recovered from the archaeological levels E and J were the main study materials. These levels were investigated regarding spatial pattern analysis and analyzed wi...
Article
Full-text available
The beginning of husbandry in the Iberian Peninsula has been documented from the second half of the 6th millennium BCE and was based on the breeding of domestic caprines, mainly sheep. The first evidence of these practices comes from the Mediterranean region, but they quickly expanded inland. Previous studies have reported on the importance of the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Since the end of the XIX century ornamental objects have been recognized as one of the main sources of information on the behavior of Paleolithic hunter-gatherer societies. During last decades, research on personal ornaments has been gaining importance in relation to the study of past societies. Most researchers recognize that ornaments constitute...
Article
This paper discusses the Middle Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age phases of the occupation of a rock shelter at Vallone Inferno (Scillato, Palermo) in Sicily. Vallone Inferno is a key site for studying the early establishment and development of pastoralism in the prehistoric mountainous environments of Sicily. Seasonal use of the site as a shelter...
Article
Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is one of the most common pathological conditions identified in the archaeological record and remains a health problem in modern populations. This study aimed to evaluate DJD of the vertebral column in a sample from a Chalcolithic collective burial at El Mirador cave (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain) dated to 4,880–4,390...
Conference Paper
Farming was one of the most significant events in human history, driving major biological and cultural change globally. The peasant way of life arrived in the Iberian Peninsula (IP) about 7500 years ago, during the Early Neolithic. It was a relatively fast process that affected both the interior and coastal zones, but it was also a heterogeneous pr...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, there has been a proliferation of studies focused on traceological analyses of shell tools, most of which have been carried out using high magnifications. In contrast, wear patterns identified in other types of shell objects, such as ornaments, are usually analyzed at low magnifications. A new approach to the technological and functional...
Article
Gigapixel and gigapixel-like (GPL) imaging strategies are a powerful means of communicating scientific results of visual observations in academic and public spheres. GPL images are made from a photomosaic of multiple, adjacent extended focus images, which allows users to “pan and zoom” across a surface to document or analyze specific features. Micr...
Article
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Dental microwear has been used for the reconstruction of diet for decades, and given its long history, substantial changes in the methodologies and technologies used to observe and quantify microwear have occurred. For instance, early work on microwear used optical microscopy (OM), before being largely replaced by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)...
Article
Anurans, such as frogs and toads, are occasionally very abundant in archaeo-paleontological sites and representing >80% of the remains. These accumulations have been linked mainly to human consumption in the European context, by the preferential selection of body parts and by the presence of burning, and to a lesser extent, cut marks (as in Chalain...
Article
Full-text available
The lithic assemblage of Barranco León (BL), attributed to the Oldowan techno-complex, contributes valuable information to reconstruct behavioral patterning of the first hominins to disperse into Western Europe. This archaic stone tool assemblage comprises two, very different groups of tools, made from distinct raw materials. On the one hand, a sma...
Article
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Over the last years, the knowledge of the children’s diet is a topic of growing interest in dental anthropology. Our aim seeks to establish patterns of interpopulation and intrapopulation variability in dietary microwear among children from four Iberian sites dated to the Neolithic through Bronze Age. Buccal and occlusal surfaces are compared to as...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient dental calculus research currently relies on destructive techniques whereby archeological specimens are broken down to determine their contents. Two strategies that could partly remediate a permanent loss of the original sample and enhance future analysis and reproducibility include (1) structural surface characterization through spectrosco...
Poster
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The mountains of Madonie Park in Sicily currently offer, situated between 1500 and 1979 m.a.s.l., one of the most southerly beech forests in Europe (Brullo et al. 2012). In this context two charcoal kiln sites have been excavated during recent survey campaigns led by the University of Palermo and IPHES at Piano Cervi (1504 m.a.s.l.) and Zottafonda...
Article
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We assembled genome-wide data from 271 ancient Iberians, of whom 176 are from the largely unsampled period after 2000 BCE, thereby providing a high-resolution time transect of the Iberian Peninsula.We document high genetic substructure between northwestern and southeastern hunter-gatherers before the spread of farming.We reveal sporadic contacts be...
Article
The study of cut marks in archaeological contexts is of great importance for understanding the subsistence strategies of past human groups. Many authors have indicated differences to exist between the cut marks produced by different tools and when the same types of tool have been made from different raw materials. The present work examines the cut...
Article
Full-text available
Silver mirroring is a type of deterioration that appears in most gelatin developing-out paper (DOP) historical photographs and black-and-white films. Its treatment involves so many problems that it has often been ruled out. In this article we present a new and simple elimination procedure, which is efficient and offers stable results in the long te...
Article
Full-text available
Heavy-duty scrapers are documented as a specific morphotype in ancient African and Eurasian toolkits from the Oldowan into the Acheulian. They are characterized by a flat platform perpendicularly oriented to a carinated edge. The convex surface of that edge displays semi-peripheral, unidirectional removals associated with steep retouch and/or crush...
Article
Full-text available
Heavy-duty scrapers are documented as a specific morphotype in ancient African and Eurasian toolkits from the Oldowan into the Acheulian. They are characterized by a flat platform perpendicularly oriented to a carinated edge. The convex surface of that edge displays semi-peripheral, unidirectional removals associated with steep retouch and/or crush...
Poster
Full-text available
Dietary habits of past people are fundamental to understanding their subsistence economy and their way of life. Dental microwear analysis is a useful tool which provides important information about diet and feeding behaviour in our ancestors. It allows us to identify the physical properties of food, as it provides information about the hardness and...
Poster
Full-text available
Dental microwear allows us to identify the physical properties of food, as it provides information about the hardness and abrasiveness of the food and shows how it was processed before being consumed. Consequently, we can deduce the diet of the human groups analyzed. This poster focuses on the characterization of dental microwear patterns to infer...
Article
Full-text available
The human impact on the environment in the Holocene has usually been characterized on the basis of palaeobotanical records, but attempts to distinguish the anthropogenic impact from natural events in landscape evolution have been the subject of much debate in recent years. The aim of this paper is to analyse small-mammal diversity and the presence...
Article
El Mirador is a cave in the Sierra de Atapuerca (northern Iberian Peninsula) that contains 27 archaeological layers from the Lateglacial to the Late Holocene. A total of 4436 small-mammal remains have been analysed from these layers, and 19 taxa have been identified (three insectivores, seven chiropters and nine rodents). The palaeoenvironmental re...
Article
Full-text available
The archaeological research focusing on El Mirador Cave (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain) has revealed a succession of occupation levels in a dung layers context that span from the early Neolithic to the middle Bronze Age. The robustness and coherence of the chronological dates of the sequence have contributed to framing the beginning of farming practic...
Article
The research for referential data on current livestock contexts is essential for correctly interpreting archaeological records documented in prehistoric livestock spaces. Experimental programmes such as the one begun in 2014 in the Mas del Pepet pen (Rojals, Tarragona) has permitted an understanding, among other matters, of fold characteristics acc...
Article
Full-text available
Ichthyoarchaeological analyses of the freshwater fish remains from levels 19 and 20 in El Mirador cave (Atapuerca, Spain) have been conducted. Fish were always present as a source of animal protein, although their importance in the human diet was not fully exploited by people during the Neolithic on the Iberian Peninsula. Two principal goals are tr...
Article
Full-text available
This paper focuses on the study of bone alterations in fumier deposits from an experimental point of view. Fumiers are characteristic of livestock enclosures in the Mediterranean area used from the Neolithic to the Bronze Age. They originate from the process of burning livestock dung piles to reduce the volume of dung accumulation and to rid these...
Article
The polish generated by sheep and goats in the walls of caves and stone-made enclosures is a clear indicator about their use as a livestock folds. The study of the polish distribution and intensity, together with the data revealed by the sedimentary context, or even if it is absent, allows to understand the kind of management carried out with the a...
Article
The archaeological site of El Mirador is located in the southern slope of the Sierra de Atapuerca. The work developed at the site is providing a substantial set of data from the Upper Palaeolithic and Early Neolithic to the Middle Bronze Age. Throughout at least about 4000 years of occupation, the cave was used for various activities, among which,...
Article
Full-text available
Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analysing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 w...
Article
Recent archaeomagnetic studies carried out on Mid-to Late Holocene burnt anthropogenic cave sediments have shown that under certain conditions, these materials are suitable geomagnetic field recorders. Archaeomagnetic analyses carried out on these contexts constitute a rich source of information not only for geophysical purposes -in terms of recons...
Preprint
Full-text available
The arrival of farming in Europe around 8,500 years ago necessitated adaptation to new environments, pathogens, diets, and social organizations. While indirect evidence of adaptation can be detected in patterns of genetic variation in present-day people, ancient DNA makes it possible to witness selection directly by analyzing samples from populatio...
Article
Two main knapping strategies can be used to start bifacial reduction on a lithic cobble or nodule: the alternate strategy, in which first one face is knapped and then the other; and the alternating strategy, in which both faces are removed in the same sequence, interspersing core about-turns between strikes. Flaking reduction of spherical and ellip...
Article
Sheep and goats have been two of the most commonly bred species since the Early Neolithic in European contexts. Much research has been devoted to studying the economic management of these species through culling profile information. In particular, perinatal remains are one of the best indicators of breeding practices at archaeological sites. Nevert...
Article
Full-text available
La Cansaladeta is a site located in a narrow passage dug out by the Francolí River in the Pre-littoral Catalan range (NE Iberia). The archaeological deposit lies on top of a+45-50m fluvial terrace, and contains a rich Middle Pleistocene stratigraphic succession in which 10 archaeological layers have been identified.Here, we present the description...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here we present a preliminary approach to the taphofacies analysis of the El Forn Lower Pleistocene site. Since 2007, tree open air archeo-paleontological sites have been excavated at Barranc de la Boella (Tarragona, Spain): La Mina, Pit 1 locality and El Forn, dated at around 1 my old. Fossil mammals and lithic remains point to these sites as the...
Article
A number of authors have studied the variability of total perikymata counts on permanent incisors in different modern human populations, finding that some populations show a significantly lower number of perikymata than others. However, little is known about the overall variability of these traits in archaeological populations of modern humans. Our...