Jill Eileen Richardson

Jill Eileen Richardson
University of Wisconsin–Madison | UW · Department of Sociology

MS

About

6
Publications
213
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
2
Citations
Introduction
Using participant observation and interviews, I study how hunters, ranchers, environmental and animal rights activists, U.S. government, and Native American tribes conflict and collaborate to manage wolves, grizzly bears, and elk in Montana and Wyoming. Areas of interest include: environmental justice, governance of natural resources, social movements and political sociology, food and agriculture, and science and technology studies.

Publications

Publications (6)
Preprint
How do hunters and livestock producers who report increased tolerance for wolves account for the changes in their attitudes, and how can their perspectives inform researchers’ understanding of human conflicts about wolves? I explore this by analyzing interviews with people who live, work, and recreate in the Blackfoot watershed, Montana. All interv...
Preprint
Full-text available
How do hunters and livestock producers who report increased tolerance for wolves account for the changes in their attitudes, and how can their perspectives inform researchers' understanding of human conflicts about wolves? I explore this by analyzing interviews with people who live, work, and recreate in the Blackfoot watershed, Montana. All interv...
Article
Full-text available
Many scholars agree that both expert and lay knowledge are needed to gain a fuller understanding of environmental problems, both to find answers to the problems and to improve relations between experts and laypeople. When experts ignore lay knowledge, laypeople can resist by accusing experts of arrogance or conspiracy. Rural people who live among l...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many scholars agree that both expert and lay knowledge are needed to gain a fuller understanding of environmental problems, both to find answers to the problems and to improve relations between experts and lay people. When experts ignore lay knowledge, lay people can resist by accusing experts of arrogance or conspiracy. Rural people who live among...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) is a way for government to share power with communities through participatory natural resource management, but many programs fail when government will not sufficiently relinquish power. Constitutionality provides a bottom-up approach that corrects many of CBNRM's common pitfalls, but sometimes the...