Jill Jankowski

Jill Jankowski
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Zoology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

45
Publications
7,151
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,427
Citations

Publications

Publications (45)
Article
Full-text available
The Andean bellflowers comprise an explosive radiation correlated with shifts to specialized pollination. One diverse clade has evolved with extremely curved floral tubes and is predicted to be pollinated exclusively by one of two parapatric species of sicklebill hummingbirds (Eutoxeres). In this study, we focused on the floral biology of Centropog...
Article
We developed aging criteria for 7 species of manakins (Pipridae) from the Manu Biosphere Reserve, Peru, based on patterns of plumage maturation and wing-feather replacement following their preformative molt, and summarize information on their morphological characteristics. Each species underwent a partial preformative molt, which could be identifie...
Article
AbstractA feature of biodiversity is the abundance of curves displayed by organs and organisms. Curvature is a widespread, convergent trait that has important ecological and evolutionary implications. In pollination ecology, the curvature of flowers and pollinator mouthparts (e.g., hummingbird bills) along the dorsiventral plane has been associated...
Preprint
Full-text available
A feature of biodiversity is the abundance of curves displayed by organs and organisms. Curvature is a widespread, convergent trait that has important ecological and evolutionary implications. In pollination ecology, the curvature of flowers and pollinator mouthparts (e.g. hummingbird bills) along the dorsiventral plane has been associated with spe...
Article
Tropical montane landscapes harbor diverse flora and fauna, and many species there are ecological specialists with narrow elevational distributions, limited geographic ranges, and small global populations. Along elevational gradients, environmental conditions and community composition change dramatically over small spatial scales. As forests are di...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global change creates an urgent need to predict spatial responses of biota to support the conservation of sufficient habitat to maintain biodiversity. We present species distribution model theory and a synthesis of avian literature on approaches to collecting occurrence data, selecting explanatory variables and analytical processes currently in use...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical birds are purported to be longer lived than their temperate counterparts, but it has not been shown whether avian survival rates covary with latitude worldwide. Here, we perform a global‐scale meta‐analysis of 949 estimates from 204 studies of avian survival and demonstrate that a latitudinal survival gradient exists in the northern hemisp...
Article
Full-text available
en For many territorial hummingbirds, habitat use is influenced primarily by the interaction between resource acquisition and non‐foraging behaviors such as territory advertisement and defense. Previous research has highlighted the importance of foraging‐associated habitat features like resource density and distribution in determining the space‐use...
Preprint
Full-text available
Tropical birds are purported to be longer lived than temperate species of similar size, but it has not been shown whether avian survival rates covary with a latitudinal gradient worldwide. Here, we perform a global-scale meta-analysis to investigate the extent of the latitudinal survival gradient. We modeled survival as a function of latitude for t...
Article
Full-text available
La Reserva de Biosfera Manu alberga una de las avifaunas más diversas del mundo. Pese a que la exploración ornitológica del Manu lleva más de cuatro décadas, en esta nota reportamos nuevos registros en la reserva del Gavilán Carinegro Leucopternis melanops, y registros adicionales de dos especies poco conocidas: Picolanza Frentiazul Doryfera johann...
Data
Supporting information for our publication in Functional Ecology: Survival is negatively related to basal metabolic rate in tropical Andean birds. Data include: Figures 1) Map of study area 2) Seasonal variation in BMR 3) Phylogeny of species used in the analysis 4) Comparison of survival rates with other studies Tables 1) Net hours 2) Results of...
Article
1.Life history theory postulates that physiological traits, such as energy metabolism, can be understood in terms of allocation trade‐offs between self‐maintenance and reproduction over an organism's lifespan, and data show that metabolic intensity and survival vary inversely with latitude, with tropical birds exhibiting a ‘slow’ pace of life relat...
Article
Full-text available
The Shining Sunbeam (Aglaeactis cupripennis) is a widespread and relatively common high-elevation hummingbird in the tropical Andes. Despite this, there is no comprehensive record of its natural history. In this study we present our findings on the diet and territorial behavior of Shining Sunbeam at sites in Peru and Ecuador. Using radio telemetry...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster provides background and supplementary information to our article published in Ornitología Neotropica entitled "Molt patterns and sexing and aging criteria for ten species of high elevation landbirds from southeastern Peru".
Article
Full-text available
The diversity of permanent ectoparasites is likely underestimated due to the difficulty of collecting samples. Lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) are permanent ectoparasites of birds and mammals; there are approximately 5,000 species described and many more undescribed, particularly in the Neotropics. We document the louse genera collected from birds sam...
Presentation
Full-text available
This speed talk examines (quickly) the relationships between apparent survival, energy metabolism, and the environment.
Article
Full-text available
Relatively little is known about the longevity of free-living landbirds, especially in the tropics. We used mark-recapture data for birds originally banded in 2005 and 2006, and later recaptured between 2011 and 2016, to estimate minimum longevity for 20 species from southeastern Peru. The oldest recorded longevity was 10 years, 6 months for a Blac...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of molt patterns and their resulting plumages is useful for aging and sexing birds and, in mono-chromatic species, morphometric measurements can help to discern males from females. However, these data are largely undescribed for the majority of the world's bird species, especially in the tropics. We sought to classify the molt strategy fo...
Article
Full-text available
This study establishes an altiudinal gradient, spanning from the highland Andes (2400 m) to lowland Amazon, as a productive region for the study of bird pollination in Southeastern Peru. The 'Manú Gradient' has a rich history of ornithological research, the published data and resources from which lay the groundwork for analyses of plant-bird intera...
Article
Full-text available
FULL TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE AT http://escholarship.org/uc/item/8r20x7qz There is a great deal of interest in the effects of biotic interactions on geographic distributions. Nature contains many different types of biotic interactions (notably mutualism, commensalism, predation, amensalism, and competition), and it is difficult to compare the effects...
Article
There is no consensus on when biotic interactions impact the range limits of species. Starting from MacArthur's use of invasibility to understand how biotic interactions influence coexistence, here we examine how biotic interactions shape species distributions. Range limits emerge from how birth, death, and movement rates vary with the environment....
Article
Full-text available
Along tropical mountains, species often occupy narrow altitude ranges. Numerous biotic and abiotic factors have been proposed as determinants of altitude occupancy. We measured several aspects of thermal physiology of 215 bird species across a 2·6-km altitude gradient in the Peruvian Andes. We predicted that highland species would show adaptation t...
Article
Full-text available
1. Life history varies across latitudes, with the ‘pace of life’ being ‘slower’ in tropical regions. Because life history is coupled to energy metabolism via allocation tradeoffs and links between performance capacity and energy use, low metabolic intensity is expected in tropical animals. Low metabolism has been reported for lowland tropical birds...
Article
A central current debate in community ecology concerns the relative importance of deterministic versus stochastic processes underlying community structure. However, the concept of stochasticity presents several profound philosophical, theoretical and empirical challenges, which we address here. The philosophical argument that nothing in nature is t...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Tropical mountains harbor some of the world’s most diverse ecological communities due to high species turnover generated by narrow elevational ranges of species. Our research investigates the importance of biotic factors in reinforcing elevational ranges of tropical birds, with the goal to understand how such high speci...
Article
Full-text available
Small-bodied birds engaging in incubation by a single sex experience a tradeoff between incubating to create a buffered thermal environment for their eggs and foraging to meet their own energetic requirements. This tradeoff is intensified in alpine environments, which are characterized by cold and variable conditions. We monitored the incubation rh...
Article
Understanding patterns of species turnover along environmental gradients and their consistency across taxonomic groups is central to the study of biodiversity. We may expect congruence in diversity patterns across groups whose ranges could be influenced by species interactions. We explore associations between bird and vegetation communities in the...
Article
Incubating birds can incur high energetic costs and, when faced with a trade-off between incubation and foraging, parents may neglect their eggs in favor of their own somatic needs. Extended incubation recesses are an example of neglect, but they are often treated as outliers and largely overlooked in studies of incubation behavior. We studied incu...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical mountains contain some of the world’s richest animal communities as a result of high turnover of species along elevational gradients. We describe an approach to study the roles of biotic and abiotic factors in establishing elevational ranges, and to improve our ability to predict the effects of climate change on these communities. As a fra...
Article
Full-text available
Propagule pressure can determine the success or failure of invasive plant range expansion. Range expansion takes place at large spatial scales, often encompassing many types of land cover, yet the effect of landscape context on propagule pressure remains largely unknown. Many studies have reported a positive correlation between invasive plant abund...
Article
Tropical montane species are characterized by narrow elevational distributions. Recent perspectives on mechanisms maintaining these restricted distributions have emphasized abiotic processes, but biotic processes may also play a role in their establishment or maintenance. One historically popular hypothesis, especially for birds, is that interspeci...
Article
Significant changes in the climates of Central America are expected over the next century. Lowland rainforests harbor high alpha diversity on local scales (<1 km 2), yet montane landscapes often support higher beta diversity on 10-100 km 2 scales. Climate change will likely disrupt the altitudinal zonation of montane communities that produces such...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods One of the most important challenges facing ecologists and conservationists is to understand how species composition of communities changes across heterogeneous landscapes. On the level of individual species, an important corollary is to understand ecological factors that enforce the limits of species’ ranges. Tropical...
Article
Full-text available
Practically all animals are affected by humans, especially in urban areas. Although most species respond negatively to urbanization, some thrive in human-dominated settings. A central question in urban ecology is why some species adapt well to the presence of humans and others do not. We show that Northern Mockingbirds (Mimus polyglottos) nesting o...
Article
St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands, is one of the most forested islands in the West Indies and provides an opportunity to conserve both resident birds and wintering neotropical migrants. We conducted double-observer point counts of landbirds in December 2005 and 2006 in Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plots and National Park Service (NPS) trails in...
Article
1. Understanding how species in a diverse regional pool are spatially distributed with respect to habitat types is a longstanding problem in ecology. Tropical species are expected to be specialists along environmental gradients, and this should result in rapid compositional change (high beta diversity) across landscapes, particularly when alpha div...
Article
Full-text available
Species’ rarity is expressed and measured at a variety of spatial scales, and rarity at different scales could be correlated. Considerable empirical evidence has supported a positive correlation between spatial distribution and local numerical abundance of species, which could create a syndrome of rarity for species limited in geographic distributi...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Little is known about the molt patterns of most of the world's birds, especially in tropical regions. To help close this knowledge gap, this project aims to provide new descriptions of molt patterns and strategies as well as aging and sexing criteria for Neotropical birds.