Jie Sui

Jie Sui
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Experimental Psychology

About

108
Publications
41,430
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3,362
Citations
Citations since 2016
64 Research Items
2819 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (108)
Article
Full-text available
Background Antidepressants are proposed to work by increasing sensitivity to positive versus negative information. Increasing positive affective learning within social contexts may help remediate negative self-schema. We investigated the association between change in biased learning of social evaluations about the self and others, and mood during e...
Article
Background Effective screening is important to combat the raising burden of depression and opens a critical time window for early intervention. Clinical use of non-verbal depression screening is nascent, yet a promising and viable candidate to supplement verbal screening. Differential self- and emotion-processing in depression patients were previou...
Preprint
Background: It has been proposed that antidepressants operate by increasing sensitivity to positive versus negative information. Increasing positive affective learning within social contexts may play a key role in remediating negative self-schema. We investigated the association between change in biased learning of social evaluations about the self...
Article
Autonomous driving has attracted great attention from both academics and industries. To realise autonomous driving, Deep Imitation Learning (DIL) is treated as one of the most promising solutions, because it improves autonomous driving systems by automatically learning a complex mapping from human driving data, compared to manually designing the dr...
Article
Background Depression is characterised by a heightened self-focus, which is believed to be associated with differences in emotion and reward processing. However, the precise relationship between these cognitive domains is not well understood. We examined the role of self-reference in emotion and reward processing, separately and in combination, in...
Article
The self-construal is one of the most significant cultural markers in humans. Accordingly, mapping the relationship between brain activity and self-construal contributes to understanding the nature of such psychological traits. Existing studies have mainly focused on static functional brain activities in specific brain regions. However, evidence ha...
Preprint
Autonomous driving has attracted great attention from both academics and industries. To realise autonomous driving, Deep Imitation Learning (DIL) is treated as one of the most promising solutions, because it improves autonomous driving systems by automatically learning a complex mapping from human driving data, compared to manually designing the dr...
Article
Self-construal (orientations of independence and interdependence) is a fundamental concept that guides human behaviour, and it is linked to a large number of brain regions. However, understanding the connectivity of these regions and the critical principles underlying these self-functions are lacking. Because brain activity linked to self-related p...
Article
Self-compassion is an important emotion regulation strategy predicting positive psychological health and fewer psychopathological problems, but little is known about its structural neural basis. In the current study, we investigated the neurostructural correlates of dispositional self-compassion and its components using voxel-based morphometry (VBM...
Article
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Neurological disorders are a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Can virtual reality (VR) based intervention, a novel technology-driven change of paradigm in rehabilitation, reduce impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions? This question is directly addressed here for the first time using an umbrella review that...
Article
Identifying cognitive dysfunction in early stages of Bipolar Disorder (BD) can allow for early intervention. Previous studies have shown a strong correlation between cognitive dysfunction and number of manic episodes. The objective of this study was to apply machine learning (ML) techniques on a battery of cognitive tests to identify first episode...
Article
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Cognitive biases shape our perception of the world and our interactions with other people. Information related to the self and our social ingroups is prioritised for cognitive processing and can therefore form some of these key biases. However, ingroup biases may be elicited not only for established social groups, but also for minimal groups assign...
Article
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Background Depression is characterised by negative views of the self. Antidepressant treatment may remediate negative self-schema through increasing processing of positive information about the self. Changes in affective processing during social interactions may increase expression of prosocial behaviours, improving interpersonal communications. A...
Article
During the past two decades, cognitive neuroscientists have sought to elucidate the common neural basis of the experience of beauty. Still, empirical evidence for such common neural basis of different forms of beauty is not conclusive. To address this question, we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis on the existing neu...
Article
Action video game players (AVGPs) have been shown to have an enhanced cognitive control ability to reduce stimulus-driven attentional capture (e.g., from an exogenous salient distractor) compared with non-action video game players (NVGPs). Here we examined whether these benefits could extend to the memory-driven attentional capture (i.e., working m...
Article
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Gratitude and joy are critical for promoting well-being. However, the differences between the two emotions and corresponding neural correlates are not understood. Here we addressed these issues by eliciting the two emotions using the same stimuli in an fMRI task. In this help reception task, participants imagined them in a situation where they need...
Article
Consumer ethnocentrism tendency (CET) refers to consumers’ belief about the appropriateness and morality of buying foreign products, and this concept characterizes consumers’ tendency to differentiate in-group and out-group commercial products and to avoid imported products for nationalistic reasons. In order to identify the neural correlates of in...
Article
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We examined whether differential self-perception influences the salience of emotional stimuli in depressive disorders, using a perceptual matching task in which geometric shapes were arbitrarily assigned to the self and an unknown other. Participants associated shapes with personal labels (e.g. 'self' or 'other'). Each geometric shape additionally...
Article
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People display systematic priorities to self-related stimuli. As the self is not a unifed entity, however, it remains unclear which aspects of the self are crucial to producing this stimulus prioritization. To explore this issue, we manipulated the valence of the self-concept (good me vs. bad me) — a core identity-based facet of the self — using a...
Article
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In their seminal paper ‘Is our self nothing but reward’, Northoff and Hayes (Biol Psychiatry 69(11):1019–1025, Northoff, Hayes, Biological Psychiatry 69(11):1019–1025, 2011) proposed three models of the relationship between self and reward and opened a continuing debate about how these different fields can be linked. To date, none of the proposed m...
Article
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We reported a questionnaire dataset accumulated from the revision of a Chinese version of Free Will and Determinism Scale Plus (FAD+). In this dataset, we collected data from 1232 participants. The questionnaires used in data collection included the FAD+ and 13 other widely-used questionnaires or tests (for example, the Big Five Inventory, the Mult...
Article
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Earlier work has demonstrated that attention is indirectly cognitively malleable by processes of self-association – processes by which agents explicitly associate an item with the self. We extend this work by considering the manipulation of attention to both salient and non-salient objects. We demonstrate that self-association impacts attentional p...
Article
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Recent research has revealed a pervasive bias for self-relevant information during decision-making, a phenomenon termed the self-prioritization effect. Focusing almost exclusively on between-target (e.g., self vs. friend) differences in task performance, however, this work has overlooked the influence stimulus factors potentially exert during decis...
Article
We share Jaswal & Akhtar's concerns about the unintended repercussions of assumed social disinterest in autism. We expand consideration of these consequences with discussion of the literature and our own work on loneliness, mental ill-health, and self-representation, which is a cornerstone to social and emotional health. Further study is needed wit...
Article
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Two studies investigated associations between habits and identity, in particular what people consider as their “true self.” Habit-identity associations were assessed by within-participant correlations between self-reported habit and associated true self ratings of 80 behaviors. The behaviors were instantiations of 10 basic values. In Study 1, signi...
Article
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Previous research on cross-culture comparisons found that Western cultures tend to value independence and the self is construed as an autonomous individual, while Eastern cultures value interdependence and self-identity is perceived as embedded among friends and family members (Markus and Kitayama, 1991). The present experiment explored these cultu...
Preprint
Full-text available
We reported a questionnaire dataset accumulated from two projects: the revision of a Chinese version of Free Will and Determinism Scale Plus (CFAD+) and a laboratory study of perceptual prioritization of self. In this dataset, we collected data from 1232 participants. The questionnaires used in these two projects included the CFAD+ and 13 other wid...
Preprint
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We embrace the values of openness and transparency in science (Schönbrodt et al., 2015) and will furthermore publish all data (raw and processed) necessary to reproduce the reported results in this manuscript (see https://osf.io/s9xds/). Abstract The existence of a common beauty is a long-standing debate in philosophy and related disciplines. In th...
Preprint
The Free Will and Determinism Plus (FAD+) is a widely-used questionnaire in research of belief in free will and has been translated into different languages. The present study aimed to assess the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of FAD+. We first translated and back-translated the FAD+, and then surveyed 1474 young adults, with 1333 v...
Preprint
Full-text available
People display systematic priorities to self-related stimuli and information with a positive (vs. negative) valence. The extent to which these basic stimulus properties interact during decision-making, however, remains unspecified. To explore this issue, here we combined self-relevance and valence using a standard shape-label association task in wh...
Article
We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study and a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study to investigate the functional and structural basis of how visual search for flavor labels in packaging is influenced by the color of the packaging. The participants were cued by a flavor word before searching for a package with this flavor la...
Article
Humans prioritize stimuli related to themselves rather than to other people. How we control these priorities is poorly understood, though it is relevant to the nature of self-processing and a wide range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, from cases of strokes, dementia to depression and schizophrenia. We update the Self-Attention Netwo...
Article
People preferentially attend to external stimuli that are related to themselves compared with others. Whether a similar self-reference bias applies to internal representations, such as those maintained in working memory (WM), is presently unknown. We tested this possibility in four experiments, in which participants were first trained to associate...
Article
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Differing from basic emotions such as happiness, gratitude and elevation are important other-praising emotions. Previous behavioral studies have established that these complex emotions differ from each other; however, it remains under-investigated whether proneness to these emotions have common or distinct neuroanatomical correlates. Here we used v...
Article
Considerable evidence now shows that making a reference to the self in a task modulates attention, perception, memory, and decision-making. Furthermore, the self-reference effect (SRE) cannot be reduced to domain-general factors (e.g., reward value) and is supported by distinct neural circuitry. However, it remains unknown whether self-associations...
Article
Self-related information is under many circumstances processed in a preferred and biased way, leading to what has been termed the self-prioritisation effect (SPE). The SPE has been demonstrated with arbitrary stimuli assigned to self and others, thereby controlling the influence of familiarity, and originally been attributed to facilitated perceptu...
Article
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Previous research has demonstrated that in-group favouritism occurs not only in higher-level judgments such as reward allocation, but also in low-level perceptual and attentional tasks. Recently, Moradi, Sui, Hewstone, and Humphreys (2015) found a novel effect of in-group bias on a simple perceptual matching task in which football fans responded mo...
Article
Self representation is fundamental to mental functions. While the self has mostly been studied in traditional psychophilosophical terms ('self as subject'), recent laboratory work suggests that the self can be measured quantitatively by assessing biases towards self-associated stimuli ('self as object'). Here, we summarize new quantitative paradigm...
Article
People show biases to self-related information on a range of tasks. Key but controversial questions are whether self-related information is processed without attention, and whether self-related information determines what is attended. We examined this using patients showing visual extinction. We had patients associated shapes with themselves or the...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has revealed that self-referential processing enhances perceptual judgments - the so-called self-prioritization effect. The extent and origin of this effect remains unknown, however. Noting the multifaceted nature of the self, here we hypothesized that temporal influences on self-construal (i.e., past/future-self continuity) may ser...
Article
Studies have shown that attention prioritizes stimuli associated with the in-group. However, the extent to which this so-called in-group favoritism is driven by relevance is not clear. Here, we investigated this issue in a group of university rowers using a novel perceptual matching task based on the team label–color associations. Across three expe...
Article
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We measured changes in self and friend biases in perceptual matching in young and older participants. Participants learned associations between neutral geometric shapes and three personal labels (You, Friend, or Stranger), representing themselves, their named best friend, and a stranger not corresponding to anyone they knew. They then responded whe...
Article
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Although theoretical discourse and experimental studies on the self and reward biases have a long tradition, currently we have only a limited understanding of how the biases are represented in the brain and, more importantly, how they relate to each other. We used multi-voxel pattern analysis to test for common representations of self and reward in...
Article
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Sociocultural research has established independence and interdependence as two fundamental ways of thinking about oneself and the social world. Recent neuroscience studies further demonstrate that these orientations modulate brain activity in various self- and socially related tasks. In the current study, we explored whether the traits of independe...
Article
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People show systematic biases in perception, memory, and attention to favor information related to themselves over information related to other people. Researchers have examined these biases in order to throw light on the nature of the self. We review this evidence in memory, face recognition, and simple perceptual matching tasks through objective...
Article
We present novel data on the role of attention in eliciting enhanced processing of stimuli associated with self. Participants were required to make pro- or anti-saccades according to whether learned shape-label pairings matched or mismatched. When stimuli matched participants were required to make an anti-saccade and when the stimuli mismatched a p...
Chapter
From the early days of experimental psychology, researchers have been interested in how social information modulates perceptual and cognitive processes. A major problem in methodology reflects a difficulty in quantifying the interaction between social factors and perceptual information. Recent advancement in mathematical psychology offers a powerfu...
Article
People show biases to self-related information on a range of tasks. One key controversial question is whether self-related information is processed without awareness, which then determines what is attended. We examined this using patients showing visual extinction. Extinction patients can respond to a single stimulus on their affected side but are...
Article
Full-text available
可重复性问题是当前科学界面临的共同问题。最近, 心理学研究领域的可重复性问题也受到广泛关 注, 引起了研究者的积极讨论与探索。通过对 2008 年发表的 100 项研究结果进行大规模重复实验, 研究者发 现, 心理学研究的成功重复率约为 39%, 但该研究仍然存在着巨大的争议, 不同的研究者对其结果的解读不 尽相同。针对可重复性问题, 研究者通过数据模拟、元分析以及调查等多种方法来分析和探索其原因, 这些研 究表明, 可重复性问题本质上可能是发表的研究假阳性过高, 可疑研究操作是假阳性过高的直接原因, 而出 版偏见和过度依赖虚无假设检验则是更加深层的原因。面对可重复性问题, 研究者从统计方法和研究实践两 个方面提出了相应的解决方案, 这些方法与实践正在成为心理学研究的新标准。然而, 要解决可...
Article
In a recent article in this journal, Glyn Humphreys and I proposed a model of how self-reference enhances binding in perception and cognition [1]. We showed that self-reference changes particular functional processes; notably, self-reference increases binding between the features of stimuli and between different stages of processing. Lane and colle...
Article
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The data article includes reaction time and accuracy from four experiments. It descries three independent variables: the social meaning of geometric shape (include self, friend and stranger), the label of identify (self, friend and stranger), the body perceptive (first-person perspective and third-person perspective), see (Sun et al., 2016) [1].
Article
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Dialectical self-thinking involves holding the view that one can possess contradictory traits such as extraverted and introverted. Prior work has demonstrated that the dorsal part of anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) plays a crucial role in conflict monitoring as well as self-related processing. Here we tested the function of dACC in dialectical sel...
Article
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There are established effects of self- and reward-biases even on simple perceptual matching tasks (Sui et al., Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 2012); however we know little about whether these biases can be modulated by particular interventions, and whether the biases then change in the same way. Here we assess...
Article
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The ability to select visual targets in hierarchical stimuli can be affected by both perceptual saliency and social saliency. However, the functional relations between the effects are not understood. Here we examined whether these two factors interact or combine in an additive way. Participants first learnt to associate geometric shapes with three...
Article
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We propose a new account of how self-reference affects information processing. We report evidence that self-reference affects the binding of memory to source, the integration of parts into perceptual wholes, and the ability to switch from a prior association to new associations. Self-reference also influences the integration of different stages of...
Article
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We examined whether self-biases in perceptual matching reflect the positive valence of self-related stimuli. Participants associated geometric shapes with either personal labels (e.g., you, friend, stranger) or faces with different emotional expressions (e.g., happy, neutral, sad). They then judged whether shape-label or shape-face pairs were as or...
Article
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We report 2 experiments to assess the strength of forming and breaking associations to the self, familiar others, and unfamiliar others in a simple shape-label matching task. In each experiment, participants first formed shape-person associations (e.g., triangle-self). Subsequently, they had to relearn the associations with the shapes and labels re...
Article
People tend to respond faster to self-relevant stimuli relative to stimuli associated with other people. There is well-established evidence on the self-bias effect on high level memory and attentional processes, but little evidence for effects on perception. In this study, we test whether the self-bias effect can modulate perception, by focusing on...
Article
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Participants show a perceptual bias favoring stimuli associated with the participants themselves over stimuli associated with other people. A major account of this self-bias effect is that self-related information is intrinsically rewarding, and that high-reward stimuli have enhanced perceptual processing. Here we used redundancy gains to examine t...
Article
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With increasing popularity of high resolution neuroimaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and position emission computerized tomography (PET), a large number of neuroimaging studies have been accumulated in the last two decades.These new data brought both opportunities and challenges for cognitive neuroscientists,e...
Data
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There are biases in perceptual matching between shapes and labels referring to familiar others, compared with when the labels refer to unfamiliar people. We assessed whether these biases could be affected by differential feedback (using the differential outcomes procedure [DOP]) compared with when feedback is provided using a nondifferential outcom...
Article
Recent research suggests more enhanced processing of task-relevant self-information in Westerners than in Easterners. The current study further tested the hypothesis that self-related task-irrelevant information is processed more extensively in Westerners than in Easterners. British and Chinese participants were asked to judge the relative length o...
Article
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We report two experiments showing that dynamically orienting our own face facilitates the automatic attraction of attention. We had participants complete a cueing task where they had to judge the orientation of a lateralized target cued by a central face that dynamically changed its orientation. Experiment 1 showed a reliable cueing effect from bot...
Article
Biases to favour self-related information over information related to other people have been demonstrated across a range of both high- and low-level tasks, but it is unclear whether these tasks 'tap' the same types of self representation. Here we assess results from two patients with damage primarily to (i) left ventro-medial prefrontal (vmPFC) cor...
Article
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Although there is strong evidence that human decision making is frequently self-biased, it remains unclear whether self-biases mediate attention. Here we review evidence on the relations between self-bias effects in decision making and attention. We ask: does self-related information capture attention? Do self-biases modulate pre-attentive processe...
Article
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The perceptual matching of shapes and labels can be affected by both self- and reward-biases when shapes are linked either to labels referring to particular individuals (you, friend, stranger) or to different reward values (£8, £2, £0). We investigated the relations between these biases by varying the reward value associated with particular shape-l...
Article
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Participants are biased in responding to stimuli associated with themselves compared with stimuli related to other people. This self-bias may reflect the reward value of self-related stimuli (Sui, He, & Humphreys, 2012). In this article, we examined the identification of self- and reward-associated stimuli under conditions in which either single or...
Article
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There is much evidence indicating that people are biased towards information relevant to themselves compared with information relevant to other people, but the nature of these effects is often unclear: Do they reflect stimulus familiarity? Do they reflect changes in perception? Do they occur automatically? Are the effects similar to changes in the...
Article
We report a novel effect of in-group bias on a task requiring simple perceptual matching of stimuli. Football fans were instructed to associate the badges of their favorite football team (in-group), a rival team (out-group), and neutral teams with simple geometric shapes. Responses to matching in-group stimuli were more efficient, and discriminabil...