Jianshuang Wu

Jianshuang Wu
Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences | CAAS · Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development in Agriculture

PhD

About

111
Publications
30,995
Reads
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2,836
Citations
Introduction
Prof. Wu and his team’s research investigates climate change, grazing management, payment for ecosystem service, plant community assembly, net primary productivity, biomass allocation strategy, soil and ecosystem respiration, resource use efficiency, functional group/trait diversity, and ecosystem multi-functionality of alpine grasslands on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. His team is also interested in the topics mentioned above for temperate prairies and alpine pastures worldwide.
Additional affiliations
May 2019 - December 2019
Freie Universität Berlin
Position
  • Researcher
January 2017 - May 2019
Freie Universität Berlin
Position
  • Fellow
October 2014 - December 2016
Freie Universität Berlin
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2007 - December 2012
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Field of study
  • Ecology
September 2003 - June 2007
Hebei Normal University
Field of study
  • Geography

Publications

Publications (111)
Article
Full-text available
The biodiversity-productivity relationship is still under debate for alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau. We know little about direct and indirect effects of biotic and abiotic drivers on this relationship, especially in regard to plant functional trait diversity. Here, we examine how aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and precipitati...
Article
The biodiversity-productivity relationship is critical for better predicting ecosystem responses to climate change and human disturbance. However, it remains unclear about the effects of climate change, land use shifts, plant diversity, and their interactions on productivity partitioning above- and below-ground components in alpine grasslands on th...
Article
Nitrogen (N) cycling is a critical pathway by which producer, consumer, and decomposer interact with each other and with environmental circumstances simultaneously. The natural abundance composition of 15 N/ 14 N in plants and soils (termed as δ 15 N plant and δ 15 N soil), as well as the difference between them (δ 15 N soil-to-plant = δ 15 N plant...
Article
Full-text available
Climate models predict the further intensification of global warming in the future. Drylands, as one of the most fragile ecosystems, are vulnerable to changes in temperature, precipitation, and drought extremes. However, it is still unclear how plant traits interact with soil properties to regulate drylands’ responses to seasonal and interannual cl...
Article
Alpine grasslands on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are sensitive and vulnerable to climate change and human activities. Climate warming and overgrazing have already caused degradation in a large fraction of alpine grasslands on this plateau. However, it remains unclear how human activities (mainly livestock grazing) regulates vegetation dynamics unde...
Article
Structural information of grassland changes on the Tibetan Plateau is essential for understanding alterations in critical ecosystem functioning and their underlying drivers that may reflect environmental changes. However, such information at the regional scale is still lacking due to methodological limitations. Beyond remote sensing indicators only...
Article
Full-text available
Protists are essential components of soil microbial communities, mediating nutrient cycling and ecosystem functions in terrestrial ecosystems. However, their distribution patterns and driving factors, particularly, the relative importance of climate, plant and soil factors, remain largely unknown. This limits our understanding of soil protist roles...
Article
Greening of the Earth is among the world's most important ecological changes in recent decades, but its effects and triggers are multifaceted and varied across the globe. Climate change is the primary driver for greening of the Tibetan Plateau (TP), where vegetation is of great significance for resident survival, carbon sequestration and climate fe...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Overgrazing and warming are thought to be responsible for the loss of species diversity, declined ecosystem productivity and soil nutrient availability of degraded grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau. Mineral elements in soils critically regulate plant individual’s growth, performance, reproduction, and survival. However, it is still unc...
Article
Full-text available
We sought to understand the role that water availability (expressed as an aridity index) plays in determining regional and global patterns of richness and evenness, and in turn how these water availability-diversity relationships may result in different richness-evenness relationships at regional and global scales. We examined relationships between...
Article
Full-text available
Nitrogen (N) deposition can affect the global ecosystem carbon balance. However, how plant community assembly regulates the ecosystem carbon exchange in response to the N deposition remains largely unclear, especially in alpine meadows. In this study, we conducted a manipulative experiment to examine the impacts of N (ammonium nitrate) addition on...
Article
Full-text available
Warming is expected to intensify hydrological processes and reshape precipitation regimes, which is closely related to water availability for terrestrial ecosystems. Effects of the inter-annual precipitation changes on plant growth are widely concerned. However, it is not well-known how plant growth responds to intra-annual precipitation regime han...
Article
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The interaction of warming and soil texture on responsiveness of the key soil processes i.e. organic carbon (C) fractions, soil microbes, extracellular enzymes and CO 2 emissions remains largely unknown. Global warming raises the relevant question of how different soil processes will respond in near future, and what will be the likely regulatory ro...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change and land-use disturbances are supposed to have severely affected the degraded alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau. Artificial grassland establishment has been implemented as a restoration tool against grassland degradation. However, the impact of such degradation and restoration processes on soil microbial communities and soil q...
Preprint
Plant-soil microbe linkage is theoretically positive, but rarely observed in natural ecosystems. We hypothesized that animal grazing decouples this linkage, for plant removal usually decreases plant influences on soil microbiota. We tested the hypothesis by exploring plant and soil microbial diversity in grazed versus non-grazed grasslands along a...
Article
Full-text available
Tillage is one of the agricultural management practices that significantly impacts agroecosystems, crop production, and the environment. Conventional tillage (CT) practices alter the soil environment and induce organic constituents’ decomposition and the emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs), which contribute to the greenhouse effect and global warmi...
Article
Full-text available
The accurate simulation and prediction of grassland aboveground biomass (AGB) and theoretical livestock carrying capacity are key steps for maintaining ecosystem balance and sustainable grassland management. The AGB in fenced grassland is not affected by grazing and its variability is only driven by climate change, which can be regarded as the gras...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Asian Grassland Conference (AGC) is a virtual event organised by the Eurasian Dry Grassland Group (EDGG; www.edgg.org). It is free of charge, owing to the generous support of the International Association for Vegetation Sci-ence (IAVS), the mother organization of EDGG, and the Inner Mongolia University. Due to important cultural and scientific...
Article
Dryland soils consistently exhibit a low capacity for the long‐term accumulation and storage of organic matter, which has been primarily attributed to low plant biomass inputs under drought suppression. Whether, and how, soil organic matter (SOM) compositions contribute to the consistently low SOM storage have been puzzling. A fundamental understan...
Article
To alleviate grassland degradation and improve ecosystem functions, the Chinese government has implemented some ecological projects since 2004 across the Tibetan Plateau, such as ‘Return Grazing Land to Grassland Project’ and the ‘Compensation and Rewards to Herders for Natural Grassland Conservation’. Meanwhile, the frequency and intensity of drou...
Article
Full-text available
Aims Understanding fine-grain diversity patterns across large spatial extents is fundamental for macroecological research and biodiversity conservation. Using the GrassPlot database, we provide benchmarks of fine-grain richness values of Palaearctic open habitats for vascular plants, bryophytes, lichens and complete vegetation (i.e., the sum of the...
Article
Full-text available
Changing precipitation and temperature are principal drivers for nutrient cycling dynamics in drylands. Foliar isotopic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) composition (δ<sup>13</sup>C and δ<sup>15</sup>N) are often used to describe the plant’s water use efficiency and nitrogen use strategy in plant ecology research. However, the drivers and mechanisms und...
Article
Climate change and human activities have profoundly changed the structure and functioning of alpine grassland ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau, the most critical ecological safety shelter for Asia. However, it remains unclear to what degree human activity intensity has impacted the alpine grasslands of the Tibetan Plateau. Here we quantify human a...
Article
Full-text available
Questions: Species-area relationships (SARs) are fundamental for understanding biodiversity patterns and are generally well described by a power law with a constant exponent z. However, z-values sometimes vary across spatial scales. We asked whether there is a general scale dependence of z-values at fine spatial grains and which potential drivers i...
Article
Identifying the driving forces and mechanisms underlying vegetation change is critical to globally adapting to future climate change. However, this topic remains unclear for ecosystems within the Headwater Source Region of Brahmaputra and Indus (HSRBI), southwestern Tibetan Plateau. In this study, vegetation changes, in terms of the Normalized Diff...
Article
Full-text available
Warming-induced carbon loss through terrestrial ecosystem respiration ( Re ) is likely getting stronger in high latitudes and cold regions because of the more rapid warming and higher temperature sensitivity of Re ( Q 10 ). However, it is not known whether the spatial relationship between Q 10 and temperature also holds temporally under a future wa...
Article
Full-text available
Alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau, being vulnerable to environmental and anthropogenic changes, have experienced dramatic climate change and intensive livestock grazing during the last half-century. Climate change, coupled with grazing activities, has profoundly altered alpine grassland function and structure and resulted in vast grassland d...
Article
Full-text available
The natural shift in land cover from non-vegetated to vegetated land is termed as vegetation expansion, which has substantial impacts on regional climate conditions and land surface energy balance. Barrens dominate the northwestern Tibetan Plateau, where vegetation is predicted to expand northwestward with the ongoing climate warming. However, rare...
Article
Full-text available
Phenology is an important indicator of plant responses to environmental changes and is closely correlated with biomass production. However, how changes in phenological events affect plant biomass production when exposed to changing temperature and precipitation remain unclear. We conducted a 4‐year manipulative experiment of warming and precipitati...
Article
Livestock grazing is one of primary way to use grasslands throughout the world, and the forage-livestock balance of grasslands is a core issue determining animal husbandry sustainability. However, there are few methods for assessing the forage-livestock balance and none of those consider the dynamics of external abiotic factors that influence forag...
Article
Full-text available
Natural selection drives local adaptations of species to biotic or abiotic environmental stresses. As a result, adaptive phenotypic divergence can evolve among related species living in different habitats. However, the genetic foundation of this divergence process remains largely unknown. Two closely related alpine grass species, Stipa capillacea a...
Article
Full-text available
Species richness is the core of biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) research. Nevertheless, it is difficult to accurately predict changes in plant species richness under different climate scenarios, especially in alpine biomes. In this study, we surveyed plant species richness from 2009 to 2017 in 75 alpine meadows (AM), 199 alpine steppes (AS...
Article
Climate change critically affects the carbon cycle of terrestrial ecosystems and thereafter the climate-carbon feedback. Previous studies have addressed the changes in temporal and spatial distribution of precipitation, termed as altered precipitation regimes. However, the response of terrestrial carbon cycle to the changes remain unclear. In this...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing ecosystem vulnerability to climate change is critical for sustainable and adaptive ecosystem management. Alpine grasslands on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau are considered to be vulnerable to climate change, yet the ecosystem tends to maintain stability by increasing resilience and decreasing sensitivity. To date, the spatial pattern of gras...
Article
Identifying the effects of climate change and human activities on the degradation and restoration of terrestrial ecosystems is essential for sustainable management of these ecosystems. However, our knowledge of methodology on this topic is limited. To assess the relative contribution of climate change and human activities, actual and potential net...
Article
Full-text available
Grasslands cover a large portion of the terrestrial ecosystems, and are vital for biodiversity conservation, environmental protection and livestock husbandry. However, grasslands are degraded due to unreasonable management worldwide, i.e., soil erosion indirectly due to the damage of overgrazing on vegetation coverage and soil texture. An in-depth...
Article
Allowancing and awarding to local herdsman families for degraded grassland restoration via grazing exclusion is an important eco-compensation policy in China. A scientific assessment on how grazing exclusion and climate change affect ecological restoration is essential for improving the layout of enclosures at a broad spatial scale in future. In th...
Article
Full-text available
Monitoring and mapping the sensitivity of grassland ecosystems to climate change is crucial for developing sustainable local grassland management strategies. The sensitivity of alpine grasslands to climate change is considered to be high on the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau (QTP), yet little is known about its spatial pattern, and particularly the variatio...
Article
Forage-livestock balance is important for sustainable management of alpine grasslands under global change, but the robustness of diverse algorithms for assessing forage-livestock balance is still unclear. This study compiled long-term (2009-2014) field observations of aboveground biomass (AGB). Using climate and remote sensing data, we evaluated th...
Article
Full-text available
The timing regimes of precipitation can exert profound impacts on grassland ecosystems. However, it is still unclear how the peak aboveground biomass (AGB peak) of alpine grasslands responds to the temporal variability of growing season precipitation (GSP) on the northern Tibetan Plateau. Here, the temporal variability of precipitation was defined...
Article
Full-text available
Aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and rain-use efficiency (RUE) are important indicators in assessing the response of ecosystems to climate change. In this paper, the Changtang Plateau in the Tibetan Autonomous Region was selected as the study area to analyze the spatial and temporal changes of ANPP and RUE in grassland communities and th...
Article
Full-text available
Herbivores alter plant biodiversity (species richness) in many of the world’s ecosystems, but the magnitude and the direction of herbivore effects on biodiversity vary widely within and among ecosystems. One current theory predicts that herbivores enhance plant biodiversity at high productivity but have the opposite effect at low productivity. Yet,...
Article
Full-text available
Alpine vegetation on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) is known to be sensitive to both climate change and anthropogenic disturbance. However, the magnitude and patterns of alpine vegetation dynamics and the driving mechanisms behind their variation on the TP remains under debate. In this study, we used updated MODIS Collection 6 Normalized Difference Veget...
Presentation
Alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau are sensitive and vulnerable to climate change and human disturbance. Warming and overgrazing are two of the most important drivers for grassland degradation during past decades. To recover seriously degraded rangelands, approximately 4.75 million hectares of fences were built in North Tibet from 2006 to 201...
Poster
III. Methods • Plant species richness and aboveground productivity were measured at ten 1.0 m 2 plots at each site. • Soil total nitrogen (STN) and phosphorus (STP) were measured at 0-20 cm layer for each plot. • Plant and soil 15 N were measured with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. • The 15 N/ 14 N ratio of samples (R sample) was relative to t...
Article
Full-text available
Quantifying the impact of climate change and human activities on grassland dynamics is an essential step for developing sustainable grassland ecosystem management strategies. However, the direction and magnitude of climate change and human activities in driving alpine grassland dynamic over the Tibetan Plateau remain under debates. Here, we systema...
Article
Humanity is causing dramatic changes to the Earth, and we may be entering a human-dominated era referred to as the Anthropocene. Mapping the human footprint and assessing the spatial layout and effectiveness of protected areas facilitate sustainable development. As the core region of the third pole, Tibet is an important area for biodiversity and t...
Article
Anthropogenic activities have induced profound changes across the globe. Human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP) is a useful indicator for quantifying anthropogenic influences on natural ecosystems. We applied a detailed HANPP framework to the Tibet Autonomous Region of China for the period 1989–2015 and performed clustering analysis...
Article
Aboveground biomass (AGB) is a vital variable in global carbon cycling and plays important roles in ecosystem structure and function in grasslands. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 leaf area index (LAI) and fractional photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) data were used to model AGB in a...
Poster
A sparsely-populated area (0.2 persons per km 2 land) with natural landscapes in the North Tibet (Yu et al., 2016). • Three representative grassland types, from east to west, alpine meadow, alpine steppe, and desert steppe (Li et al., 2011). • Remarkable climatic gradients of growing season temperature (GST, 4.8-8.8 ° C) and precipitation (GSP, 123...
Article
Full-text available
Resilience is an important aspect of the non-linear restoration of disturbed ecosystems. Fenced grassland patches on the northern Tibetan Plateau can be used to examine the resistance and resilience of degraded alpine grasslands to grazing and to a changing climate. To examine the non-linearity of restoration, we used moderate resolution imaging sp...