Jessica C. Walsh

Jessica C. Walsh
Monash University (Australia) · School of Biological Sciences, Clayton

PhD Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, UK

About

72
Publications
16,069
Reads
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1,416
Citations
Introduction
Jessica Walsh currently works at the School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, researching in conservation ecology, policy and management.
Additional affiliations
June 2019 - present
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • I research conservation of threatened species and ecosystems. I focus on evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of management actions.
October 2018 - December 2018
The University of Queensland
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2015 - August 2016
Simon Fraser University
Position
  • Fellow
Education
October 2011 - May 2015
University of Cambridge
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (72)
Preprint
Full-text available
Consulting the best available evidence is key to successful conservation decision-making. While much scientific evidence on conservation continues to be published in non-English languages, a poor understanding of how non-English languages science contributes to conservation decision-making is causing global assessments and studies to practically ig...
Article
Around the world, woodlands have been cleared for agricultural production and their bird communities are in decline. To reverse these declines and foster bird community resilience, government agencies, non-government organizations, and private landholders have implemented restoration actions, commonly including grazing exclusion and replanting. The...
Article
Successful, state‐dependent management, where the goal of management is to maintain a system within a desired state, involves defining the boundaries between different states. Once these boundaries have been defined, managers require a strategic action plan, with thresholds that will initiate management interventions to either maintain or return th...
Article
Peatlands support unique biodiversity and provide essential ecosystem services, such as regulating climate and providing freshwater and food. However, land-use change, resource extraction and changing climates are threatening peatlands globally. Restoring degraded peatlands requires re-establishing the key features that drive these ecosystems – the...
Article
Full-text available
1. To be effective, the next generation of conservation practitioners and managers need to be critical thinkers with a deep understanding of how to make evidence-based decisions and of the value of evidence synthesis. 2. If, as educators, we do not make these priorities a core part of what we teach, we are failing to prepare our students to make an...
Article
Full-text available
1. To be effective, the next generation of conservation practitioners and managers need to be critical thinkers with a deep understanding of how to make evidence‐based decisions and of the value of evidence synthesis. 2. If, as educators, we do not make these priorities a core part of what we teach, we are failing to prepare our students to make an...
Article
Full-text available
Current investment in conservation is insufficient to adequately protect and recover all ecosystems and species. The challenge of allocating limited funds is acute for Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. in Canada, which lack a strategic approach to ensure that resources are spent on actions most likely to cost‐effectively recover diminished populatio...
Chapter
Full-text available
Conservation Research, Policy and Practice - edited by William J. Sutherland April 2020
Article
Full-text available
Pacific salmon influence temperate terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems through the dispersal of marine-derived nutrients and ecosystem engineering of stream beds when spawning. They also support large fisheries, particularly along the west coast of North America. We provide a comprehensive synthesis of relationships between the densities of Pacif...
Article
Full-text available
Cambridge Core - Ecology and Conservation - Conservation Research, Policy and Practice - edited by William J. Sutherland
Preprint
Current investment in conservation is insufficient to adequately protect and recover all ecosystems and species. The challenge of allocating limited funds is acute for Pacific salmon ( Oncorhynchus spp.) in Canada, which lack a strategic approach to ensure that resources are spent on actions that would cost-effectively recover diminished population...
Article
Full-text available
Proponents of development projects (e.g., new roads, mines, dams) are frequently required to assess and manage their impacts on threatened biodiversity. Here, we propose that the environmental legislation and standards that mandate such assessments are failing those threatened species and ecological communities listed as vulnerable. Using a case st...
Article
Over the last decade, there has been an increased focus (and pressure) in conservation practice globally towards evidence-based or evidence-informed decision making. Despite calls for increased use of scientific evidence, it often remains aspirational for many conservation organizations. Contributing to this is the lack of guidance on how to identi...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Habitat is the foundation for healthy and productive fisheries. For fish that require substrate for spawning , lack of appropriate spawning substrate is inherently limiting and a lack of access to suitable spawning habitat will lead to population collapse. To ensure management resources are being allocated wisely and conservation target...
Research Proposal
Eastern Australia’s temperate woodlands have been significantly cleared, with 80% of their former extent already gone, and the classically Australian woodland bird community that is inseparably bound with them disintegrating. This project will identify the most cost-effective actions for restoring the woodland bird community by harnessing and synth...
Article
Full-text available
Mawdsley et al. (2018) respond disapprovingly to our 2018 review of 667 wildlife management systems across Canada and the United States, which found that many of these systems lacked the scientific hallmarks of clear objectives, evidence, transparency, and independent review. Although we strongly agree with several of Mawdsley et al.’s points about...
Article
Many of the world's fisheries are unassessed, with little information about population status or risk of overfishing. Unassessed fisheries are particularly predominant in developing countries and in small‐scale fisheries, where they are important for food security. Several catch‐only methods based on time series of fishery catch and commonly availa...
Article
Full-text available
Resource management agencies commonly defend controversial policy by claiming adherence to science-based approaches. For example, proponents and practitioners of the “North American Model of Wildlife Conservation,” which guides hunting policy across much of the United States and Canada, assert that science plays a central role in shaping policy. Ho...
Article
Fishery managers must often reconcile conflicting estimates of population status and trend. Superensemble models, commonly used in climate and weather forecasting, may provide an effective solution. This approach uses predictions from multiple models as covariates in an additional “superensemble” model fitted to known data. We evaluated the potenti...
Article
The exploitation status of marine fisheries stocks worldwide is of critical importance for food security, ecosystem conservation, and fishery sustainability. Applying a suite of data-limited methods to global catch data, combined through an ensemble modeling approach, we provide quantitative estimates of exploitation status for 785 fish stocks. Fif...
Article
Full-text available
Protected areas are a crucial tool for halting the loss of biodiversity. Yet, the management of protected areas is under resourced, impacting the ability to achieve effective conservation actions. Effective management depends on the application of the best available knowledge, which can include both scientific evidence and the local knowledge of on...
Data
Frequency of use of information sources and evidence categories by Brazilian managers of protected areas. (PDF)
Data
Details of model selection for evidence based decision making scores as a function of several potential predictors. (PDF)
Data
Questionnaire submitted to managers of Brazilian protected areas. (PDF)
Data
Importance of sources of information reported by Brazilian managers of protected areas. The dataset does not contain any data that could be used to identify any human participants in this study and importance of sources is coded as in Table 2. (CSV)
Data
Dataset used for modelling evidence based decision making scores as a function of several potential predictors. The dataset does not contain any data that could be used to identify any human participants in this study. (CSV)
Data
Distribution of Brazilian protected areas. (PDF)
Data
Frequency of use of sources of information reported by Brazilian managers of protected areas. The dataset does not contain any data that could be used to identify any human participants in this study and frequency of use of sources is coded as in Table 2. (CSV)
Data
Accessibility of sources of information reported by Brazilian managers of protected areas. The dataset does not contain any data that could be used to identify any human participants in this study and accessibility of sources is coded as in Table 2. (CSV)
Data
Accessibility and importance of evidence categories reported by Brazilian managers of protected areas. (PDF)
Data
Number and size of Brazilian protected areas and questionnaire response rates. (PDF)
Data
Factors that may influence managers of Brazilian protected areas in the search for relevant information for management related actions. (PDF)
Article
Reliability of scientific findings is important, especially if they directly impact decision making, such as in environmental management. In the 1990s, assessments of reliability in the medical field resulted in the development of evidence-based practice. Ten years later, evidence-based practice was translated into conservation, but so far no guide...
Article
Reliability of scientific findings is important, especially if they directly impact decision making, such as in environmental management. In the 1990s, assessments of reliability in the medical field resulted in the development of evidence-based practice. Ten years later, evidence-based practice was translated into conservation, but so far no guide...
Article
Full-text available
Making decisions informed by the best-available science is an objective for many organisations managing the environment or natural resources. Yet, available science is still not widely used in environmental policy and practice. We describe a ‘4S’ hierarchy for organising relevant science to inform decisions. This hierarchy has already revolutionise...
Article
Full-text available
Antarctic and Southern Ocean science is vital to understanding natural variability, the processes that govern global change and the role of humans in the Earth and climate system. The potential for new knowledge to be gained from future Antarctic science is substantial. Therefore, the international Antarctic community came together to ‘scan the hor...
Article
Full-text available
A major justification of environmental management research is that it helps practitioners, yet previous studies show it is rarely used to inform their decisions. We tested whether conservation practitioners focusing on bird management were willing to use a synopsis of relevant scientific literature to inform their management decisions. This allowed...
Article
Full-text available
Mahlon C. Kennicutt II, Steven L. Chown and colleagues outline the most pressing questions in southern polar research, and call for greater collaboration and environmental protection in the region.
Article
Full-text available
Effective conservation requires a step change in the way practitioners can contribute to science and can have access to research outputs. The journal Conservation Evidence was established in 2004 to help practitioners surmount several obstacles they face when attempting to document the effects of their conservation actions scientifically. It is eas...
Article
Aim Exotic species pose one of the most significant threats to biodiversity, especially on islands. The impacts of exotic species vary in severity among islands, yet little is known about what makes some islands more susceptible than others. Here we determine which characteristics of an island influence how severely exotic species affect its native...
Article
Decisions regarding the implementation of conservation management actions should be based on the effectiveness of past investments. However, because of limited evaluation of existing data, actions may be prescribed without evidence of producing a beneficial conservation outcome. We analysed empirical data, collected over 23 years across southern Au...
Article
Full-text available
Many countries rely on formal legislation to protect and plan for the recovery of threatened species. Even though the listing procedures in threatened species legislation are designed to be consistent for all species there is usually a bias in implementing the laws towards charismatic fauna and flora, which leads to uneven allocation of conservatio...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Australian woodland birds are declining. Several conservation interventions, such as habitat restoration, artificial nest boxes and landowner agreements, have been implemented to recover these species. This project aims to collate the existing evidence and data about the effectiveness of these management actions, and develop an adaptive management program to fill in knowledge gaps.