Jessica Waite

Jessica Waite
Pennsylvania State University | Penn State · Department of Entomology

Ph.D

About

23
Publications
4,826
Reads
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394
Citations
Introduction
Research coordinator and lab manager with 15+ years of research experience and project management. Vector biologist and ecologist with a background in evolution of vectors and infectious disease. Innovative arthropod control to reduce vector-borne pathogen transmission, especially malaria. I'm interested in all Apicomplexans, from gregarines to Plasmodium in many hosts (damselflies, birds, reptiles, humans...). All aspects of research fascinate me in this group of organisms, including evolution, ecology, host-parasite interactions (with vectors and vertebrates), genetics, phylogenetic relationships, assay development to monitor these parasites and prevent transmission, and more. Google scholar profile: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=rWJpNgsAAAAJ&hl=en
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - December 2020
Green Mountain Antibodies Inc.
Position
  • Project Manager
Description
  • https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessiwaite/ I've worked on aspects of disease and infection until recently, now I'm very much enjoying working on cures and solutions! If you are in need of a reagent antibody to continue your line of research, or are interested in developing a therapeutic for clinical trials, get in touch. I'd be glad to help you create custom monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. http://greenmoab.com/
January 2016 - June 2019
Pennsylvania State University
Position
  • Research Technologist
Description
  • Researching and developing novel mosquito control tools and strategies to combat malaria parasite transmission. Plasmodium falciparum culturing and mosquito infection experiments.
August 2012 - present
Pennsylvania State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Countries in the Asia Pacific region aim to eliminate malaria by 2030. A cornerstone of malaria elimination is the effective management of Anopheles mosquito vectors. Current control tools such as insecticide treated nets or indoor residual sprays target mosquitoes in human dwellings. We find in a high transmission region in India, malaria vector p...
Article
Full-text available
Many parasites, such as those that cause malaria, depend on an insect vector for transmission between vertebrate hosts. Theory predicts that parasites should have little or no effect on the transmission ability of vectors, e.g., parasites should not reduce vector life span as this will limit the temporal window of opportunity for transmission. Howe...
Article
Full-text available
Despite its epidemiological importance, the time Plasmodium parasites take to achieve development in the vector mosquito (the extrinsic incubation period, EIP) remains poorly characterized. A novel non-destructive assay designed to estimate EIP in single mosquitoes, and more broadly to study Plasmodium – Anopheles vectors interactions, is presented...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite its epidemiological importance, the time Plasmodium parasites take to achieve development in the vector mosquito (the extrinsic incubation period, EIP) remains poorly characterized. A novel non-destructive assay designed to estimate EIP in single mosquitoes, and more broadly to study Plasmodium – Anopheles vectors interactions, is presented...
Article
Full-text available
Insecticide-treated bed nets reduce malaria transmission by limiting contact between mosquito vectors and human hosts when mosquitoes feed during the night. However, malaria vectors can also feed in the early evening and in the morning when people are not protected. Here, we explored how the timing of blood feeding interacts with environmental temp...
Article
Full-text available
The rate of malaria transmission is strongly determined by parasite development time in the mosquito, known as the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), since the quicker parasites develop, the greater the chance that the vector will survive long enough for the parasite to complete development and be transmitted. EIP is known to be temperature-depende...
Preprint
Full-text available
A number of studies report changes in the biting time of malaria mosquitoes following the introduction of long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (LLINs). Here, we explored whether timing of blood feeding interacts with environmental temperature to influence the vector competence of Anopheles mosquitoes for the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium...
Preprint
Full-text available
The rate of malaria transmission is strongly determined by parasite development time in the mosquito, known as the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), since the quicker parasites develop, the greater the chance that the vector will survive long enough for the parasite to complete development and be transmitted. EIP is known to be temperature depende...
Article
Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) have contributed substantially to reductions in the burden of malaria in the past 15 years. Building on this foundation, the goal is now to drive malaria towards elimination. Vector control remains central to this goal, but there are limitations to what is achievable with the...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Novel interventions for malaria control are necessary in the face of problems such as increasing insecticide resistance and residual malaria transmission. One way to assess performance prior to deployment in the field is through mathematical modelling. Modelled here are a range of potential outcomes for eave tubes, a novel mosquito con...
Article
Full-text available
Control of mosquitoes requires the ability to evaluate new insecticides and to monitor resistance to existing insecticides. Monitoring tools should be flexible and low cost so that they can be deployed in remote, resource poor areas. Ideally, a bioassay should be able to simulate transient contact between mosquitoes and insecticides, and it should...
Article
We studied diverse antigen binding in hosts and the outcome of parasitism.We used captive bred F1 descendants of feral rock pigeons (Columba livia) challenged with blood feeding flies (Hippoboscidae) and a protozoan parasite (Haemoproteus). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and immunoblots were used to test (1) if pre-infection IgY antige...
Article
Transmission of insect-borne diseases is shaped by the interactions among parasites, vectors, and hosts. Any factor that alters movement of infected vectors from infected to uninfeced hosts will in turn alter pathogen spread. In this paper, we study one such pathogen-vector-host system, avian malaria in pigeons transmitted by fly ectoparasites, whe...
Article
Full-text available
Blood-feeding arthropods can harm their hosts in many ways, such as through direct tissue damage and anemia, but also by distracting hosts from foraging or watching for predators. Blood-borne pathogens transmitted by arthropods can further harm the host. Thus, effective behavioral and immunological defenses against blood-feeding arthropods may prov...
Article
In principle, the solution to stopping the spread of any vectorborne pathogen is a simple one - just stop infected vectors from biting new hosts and the pathogen cannot spread. Importantly, this does not necessarily require killing all vectors, or protecting all hosts. Transmission only occurs when an infected vector moves to a new host, and so kno...
Conference Paper
Control of malaria vectors relies heavily on the use of chemical insecticides. However, the effectiveness of current control strategies is being undermined by the evolution of insecticide resistance. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that only four classes of insecticide are approved by the WHO for use in domestic settings, creating limited o...
Article
Full-text available
Like many parasites, avian haematozoa are often found at lower infection intensities in older birds than young birds. One explanation, known as the ''selection'' hypothesis, is that infected young birds die before reaching adulthood, thus removing the highest infection intensities from the host population. We tested this hypothesis in the field by...
Article
Full-text available
Birds combat ectoparasites with many defences but the first line of defence is grooming behaviour, which includes preening with the bill and scratching with the feet. Preening has been shown to be very effective against ectoparasites. However, most tests have been with feather lice, which are relatively slow moving. Less is known about the effectiv...
Article
Full-text available
Folsomia candida Willem (Isotomidae: Collembola) is an edaphic parthenogenetic species commonly used in ecotoxicity studies. We exposed F. candida to a high dose of three antibiotics, tylosin, ampicillin, and oxytetracycline, that target different bacterial groups. Possible toxic effects were assessed through egg production, hatching, and body size...
Article
Full-text available
Results of electrophoretic surveys have suggested that hemoglobin polymorphism may be maintained by balancing selection in natural populations of house mice, Mus musculus. Here we report a survey of nucleotide variation in the adult globin genes of house mice from South America. We surveyed nucleotide polymorphism in two closely linked alpha-globin...
Article
Full-text available
Malaria parasites in the genus Plasmodium are now placed within 11 subgenera based on morphology under the light microscope, life-history traits, and host taxon. The phylogenetic significance of these characters, however, is problematic because the observed variation could be homoplasious. Using Plasmodium infections found in 2632 birds of many avi...

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