Jessica C. Stanton

Jessica C. Stanton
United States Geological Survey | USGS · Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

PhD

About

28
Publications
9,614
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,557
Citations

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
A central challenge in applied ecology is understanding the effect of anthropogenic fatalities on wildlife populations and predicting which populations may be particularly vulnerable and in greatest need of management attention. We used three approaches to investigate the potential effects of fatalities from collisions with wind turbines on 14 rapt...
Article
Full-text available
Asian carps continue to expand their range in North America, necessitating efforts to limit the spread and establishment of reproducing populations. Mississippi River Lock and Dam 19 is a high-head dam that represents a population 'pinch-point' as passage through the lock chamber is the only means by which fishes can complete upstream movement. As...
Article
Full-text available
Adaptive management (AM) is widely used as an approach for learning to improve resource management, but successful AM projects remain relatively uncommon, with few documented examples applied by natural resource management agencies. We used AM to provide insights into actions that would be most beneficial for the management of native tallgrass prai...
Article
Full-text available
Along the Santa Clara River in California, populations of the federally and state-listed Least Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) are recovering from near extirpation. Habitat protection and restoration, as well as controlling rates of brood parasitism, are thought to be the primary drivers of this recovery. Continuing successful management of th...
Poster
Bigheaded carps, bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix, were first imported to the U.S. in the early 1970’s, subsequently escaped and have become a threat to the ecology and economy of the invaded region. Their expansion throughout the Mississippi River basin now threatens the Laurentian Great Lakes. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Staggering decline of bird populations Because birds are conspicuous and easy to identify and count, reliable records of their occurrence have been gathered over many decades in many parts of the world. Drawing on such data for North America, Rosenberg et al. report wide-spread population declines of birds over the past half-century, resulting in t...
Article
Full-text available
An important metric for many aspects of species conservation planning and risk assessment is an estimate of total population size. For landbirds breeding in North America, Partners in Flight (PIF) generates global, continental, and regional population size estimates. These estimates are an important component of the PIF species assessment process,...
Article
Conservation resources are limited, and prioritizing species based on their relative vulnerability and risk of extinction is a fundamental component of conservation planning. In North America, the conservation consortium Partners in Flight (PIF) has developed and implemented a data-driven species assessment process, at global and regional scales, b...
Chapter
For this study, a methodology was developed for assessing impacts of wind energy generation on populations of birds and bats at regional to national scales. The approach combines existing methods in applied ecology for prioritizing species in terms of their potential risk from wind energy facilities and estimating impacts of fatalities on populatio...
Data
Habitat Suitability Model for Jaguar in the Upper Paraná River Corridor. (PDF)
Article
Full-text available
Jaguar (Panthera onca) populations in the Upper Parana River in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest region, live in a landscape that includes highly fragmented areas as well as relatively intact ones. We developed a model of jaguar habitat suitability in this region, and based on this habitat model, we developed a spatially structured metapopulation mode...
Article
Full-text available
Quantifying the impact of anthropogenic development on local populations is important for conservation biology and wildlife management. However, these local populations are often subject to demographic stochasticity because of their small population size. Traditional modeling efforts such as population projection matrices do not consider this source...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a methodology to assess the impacts of wind energy development on wildlife; it is a probabilistic, quantitative assessment methodology that can communicate to decision makers and the public the magnitude of these effects on species populations. The methodology is currently applicable to birds and bats, focus...
Article
Climate change is likely to become an increasingly major obstacle to slowing the rate of species extinctions. Several new assessment approaches have been proposed for identifying climate-vulnerable species, based on the assumption that established systems such as the IUCN Red List need revising or replacing because they were not developed to explic...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Identifying species vulnerable to climate change remains a challenging task for conservation biologists. Several new assessment approaches have been proposed for doing this, based on the assumption that established assessments such as the IUCN Red List need revising or replacing because they have not explicitly conside...
Article
Full-text available
There is an urgent need to develop effective vulnerability assessments for evaluating the conservation status of species in a changing climate. Several new assessment approaches have been proposed for evaluating the vulnerability of species to climate change based on the expectation that established assessments such as the IUCN Red List need revisi...
Chapter
Conservation Planning: Shaping the Future is a collection of contributed chapters that show how working scientists develop conservation plans using the best available scientific methods, data, and technology. Bringing a conservation focus to land management and planning, the authors show how planners creating human developments can still preserve h...
Conference Paper
Background / Purpose: Once the most abundant bird species in North America, the passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) was so numerous that many observers did not believe they could ever be at risk of extinction. Over-harvest and habitat loss have each been proposed as the primary factor leading to the extinction of passenger pigeon. In order...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Once the most abundant bird species in North America, the passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) was so numerous many observers did not believe they could ever be at risk of extinction. Throughout the 19th century human population growth and migration, as well as agricultural and industrial development, reduced and...
Article
1. Methods used to predict shifts in species’ ranges because of climate change commonly involve species distribution (niche) modelling using climatic variables, future values of which are predicted for the next several decades by general circulation models. However, species’ distributions also depend on factors other than climate, such as land cove...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Climate change is rarely considered when implementing conservation measures to address species-level threats. When it is considered, the methods usually focus only on climatic variables, ignoring the interactions of climate with land-use, species life history and demography, and the spatial structure of its habitat (inc...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods When data on abundance are lacking, trends in the extent of the geographic range are often used as a proxy for trends in population size. These trends are then used to estimate species extinction risks, for example through the IUCN Red List Criteria. The utility of this approach depends on the relationship between abund...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
We are developing methods to assess the risk species may experience from the impacts of wind energy development. Our goal is to create a probabilistic, quantitative assessment methodology that can communicate to decision makers and the public the magnitude of this risk on species populations. The methodology is intended to assess species at the national scale and identify those species potentially in need of more detailed study as well as those species likely at low risk from wind energy development.
Project
Objective: Development of management-unit scale regional metrics for the assessment and planning of landbird conservation. Prioritization of conservation effort is essential in today’s resource-limited environment. Most of the Joint Ventures (JVs) and Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs)—including those within Regions 3 & 4 of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service—use the information and guidance provided by Partners in Flight (PIF) to inform landbird priorities and set population objectives for avian priority and/or surrogate species. PIF provides landbird priority scores based on population size estimates, distributions in breeding and non-breeding seasons, threats, and population trends. Facilitated by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI) and Tri-Initiative Science Team (TriST), the vulnerability assessment database will soon include comparable scores for waterbirds and shorebirds. At present, PIF provides these estimates at continental and ecoregional scales (Bird Conservation Regions or BCRs). To utilize these metrics, JVs and LCCs must ‘step-down’ or recalculate these metrics for their respective geographic boundaries. The manner in which this recalculation normally is conducted makes an assumption that has the potential to introduce error when a JV or LCC is composed of multiple fragments of different BCRs. The current approach assumes species are evenly distributed across the BCRs in which they occur. Consider, for example, a species with 50% of its total population in one BCR but only 25% of that BCR’s land area in a given JV. The current approach would assume that that JV would potentially only be responsible for 12.5% of the species total population. However, the true proportion could be greater or lesser, depending on how evenly the species was distributed—anywhere from 0% to perhaps as much as 50% of the total abundance. Many species have patchy distributions, even within ecoregions. Therefore most JVs and LCCs would be well served with more precise estimates of population size proportions occurring within their jurisdictions. In addition to the corrected relative proportions of populations within JV and LCC boundaries, four additional summary metrics would provide significant value (1) at the JV level for landbird conservation planning and management guidance and (2) at the LCC level for avian surrogate species status and trend assessment: I. uncertainty ranges for total population size estimates II. cumulative percent population losses since 1970 III. projected future declines based on current trends (conservation urgency) IV. species for which current monitoring methodology is expected to become inadequate due to rarity Uncertainty ranges on population size estimates: The current population size estimates are presented without uncertainty bounds despite the fact that model parameters are highly uncertain. As imprecise as these population estimates are, they are the best estimates currently available and are widely utilized. Estimating and explicitly communicating inherent uncertainty by presenting population size estimates with confidence intervals would bring greater clarity and transparency to population estimates and derivative products. Cumulative population losses: While a species might be overall decreasing at a continental scale, it is not uncommon that there are small pockets where species abundances are stable or increasing. Having estimates of long-term population trends tailored to the geographies of the JVs and LCCs would be valuable to the mission and planning within those units and to the apportioning of responsibility for achieving stable populations at range-wide scales. Projected future declines: Cumulative population losses present the longer-term (typically past 3-4 decade) historical declines, but it is often instructive, both for setting conservation priorities and communication with partners, to have future projections or predictions based on current conditions. The investigators have developed metrics that express, if present trends continue, the number of years in the future when additional percent declines in abundance might occur. For example, this metric might be expressed as ‘species x is expected to decline by y% within the next z years’. These metrics are based on region-specific trend, population size, and population variability. How these metrics are expressed can also be tailored to the needs of individual JVs in terms of decline percentages and timelines (number of years to project into the future) that are most meaningful to their communication and planning needs. This type of metric may also aid in identifying habitat guilds that are collectively showing signs of decline (e.g., grassland birds, mature forest specialists). These metrics can also assist in monitoring progress toward population goals for surrogate species. The methodology to generate these metrics has been piloted on a preliminary basis for 303 landbirds in 33 BCRs. Time to monitoring thresholds: This metric is similar to the projected declines above in how it is parameterized and estimated but differs in that the calculation is based, not on a given percent decline, but rather on a rarity threshold that estimates when a species may no longer be reliably detected by current monitoring methods. This metric can identify species that historically were present and adequately monitored within a JV and project when in the future an alternative survey method will be necessary to continue to monitor population sizes with reasonable levels of certainty. This metric is useful for articulating the point at which imperilment considerations, legal and otherwise, might become particularly pressing for managers. In summary, these population metrics will provide fundamental tools for the Strategic Habitat Conservation elements central to sound biological planning and progress evaluation of focal and surrogate species conservation work at LCC and JV scales: setting landscape-sensitive (realistic) and motivating population goals and objectives, defining landscape designs capable of achieving resource-based objectives, and providing measures of accountability that are biologically meaningful and also effective at communicating success to both scientific and general audiences.