Jessica Schlatter

Jessica Schlatter
King's College London | KCL

PhD student

About

2
Publications
235
Reads
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7
Citations
Introduction
Biomedical PhD research student at King's College London working on a project titled "The role of Lamellipodin in pancreatic cancer proliferation and migration". I am intrigued by how deregulated cellular signalling pathways can lead to various diseases and how these can be manipulated in order to develop better treatments for diseases. I have previous experience in cancer, diabetes and immunology research with a broad range of wet lab skills from various laboratory environments.
Additional affiliations
September 2017 - November 2017
University of Illinois at Chicago
Position
  • Intern
Description
  • Internship in type I diabetes research focusing on the HIPPO signalling pathway and its regulation of proliferation in human islet cells.
June 2015 - July 2015
University of Illinois at Chicago
Position
  • Intern
Description
  • Internship in type I diabetes research, investigating whether proliferation can be induced in insulin- secreting beta cells.
Education
October 2019 - September 2023
King's College London
Field of study
September 2018 - September 2019
Imperial College London
Field of study
  • Biomedical Research
September 2014 - July 2020

Publications

Publications (2)
Article
Full-text available
Glioblastoma is a tumor type of unmet need despite the development of multimodal treatment strategies. The main factors contributing to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma patients are diverse genetic and epigenetic changes driving glioblastoma persistence and recurrence. Complemented are these factors by extracellular cues mediated through cell sur...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Alteration of signalling pathways regulating cell cycle progression is a common feature of cancer cells. Several drugs targeting distinct phases of the cell cycle have been developed but the inability of many of them to discriminate between normal and cancer cells has strongly limited their clinical potential because of their reduced e...

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