Jessica J. Meeuwig

Jessica J. Meeuwig
University of Western Australia | UWA · School of Animal Biology and Oceans Institute

PhD with Distinction

About

192
Publications
73,106
Reads
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5,972
Citations
Citations since 2016
104 Research Items
3688 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
20162017201820192020202120220100200300400500600
Additional affiliations
January 2010 - present
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Managing Director

Publications

Publications (192)
Article
Full-text available
Mutualistic and commensal interactions can have significant positive impacts on animal fitness and survival. However, behavioural interactions between pelagic animals living in offshore oceanic environments are little studied. Parasites can negatively effect the fitness of their hosts by draining resources and diverting energy from growth, reproduc...
Article
Full-text available
Tuna Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) are responsible for conservation and sustainable management of transboundary tuna resources in Exclusive Economic Zones and Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). The data collected and analyses performed by tuna RFMOs are one of the main sources of scientific information supporting the m...
Article
The ecological role of subsea pipelines is an important factor in the consideration of decommissioning options. Several studies have assessed the marine communities associated with subsea pipelines on Australia’s North West Shelf (NWS), considering the influence of factors such as water depth, substrate type, pipeline diameter and pipeline position...
Article
Full-text available
Scalloped hammerheads (Sphyrna lewini) occur in tropical to subtropical waters across all ocean basins and are globally assessed as Critically Endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. In Australia, scalloped hammerheads range from Sydney, New South Wales (34° S; 151° E), around northern Australia, down to Geographe Bay,...
Article
Full-text available
The decommissioning of offshore oil and gas platforms typically involves removing some or all of the associated infrastructure and the consequent destruction of the associated marine ecosystem that has developed over decades. There is increasing evidence of the important ecological role played by offshore platforms. Concepts such as novel ecosystem...
Article
Full-text available
The pelagic ecosystem is the ocean's largest by volume and of major importance for food provision and carbon cycling. The high fish species diversity common in the tropics presents a major challenge for biomass estimation using fisheries acoustics, the traditional approach for evaluating mid-water bio-mass. Converting echo intensities to biomass de...
Article
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Most freshwater fisheries occur in developing countries, where freshwater fish underpin local food security and small-scale fisheries livelihoods. Comprehensive catch data are fundamental to support the sustainable management of freshwater fisheries. However, freshwater catch data reported by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nati...
Article
Full-text available
Bathymetric features such as islands and seamounts, as well as dynamic ocean features such as fronts often harbour rich marine communities. We deployed mid-water baited remote underwater video systems on three expeditions in Ascension Island’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), surveying the waters associated with six different bathymetric and dynamic...
Article
Full-text available
Given the recent trend towards establishing very large marine protected areas (MPAs) and the high potential of these to contribute to global conservation targets, we review outcomes of the last decade of marine conservation research in the British Indian Ocean Territory (BIOT), one of the largest MPAs in the world. The BIOT MPA consists of the atol...
Article
Stereo baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVS) are widely used to document diversity, abundance, and biomass of marine wildlife and record unusual behaviours. We observed a cuttlefish appearing to mimic decapod morphology and locomotion during a non-targeted BRUVS study on Australia’s Northwest Shelf. While the pharaoh cuttlefish Sepia phara...
Article
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Spatial and temporal distribution of seabird transiting and foraging at sea is an important consideration for marine conservation planning. Using at‐sea observations of seabirds (n = 317), collected during the breeding season from 2012 to 2016, we built boosted regression tree (BRT) models to identify relationships between numerically dominant seab...
Article
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The conservation of marine biodiversity is firmly embedded in national and international policy frameworks. However, the difficulties associated with conducting broad-scale surveys of oceanic environments restrict the evidence base available for applied management in pelagic waters. For example, the Oceanic Shoals Australian Marine Park (AMP) was e...
Article
Western Australia's Swan River is a complex asset providing environmental, recreational and commercial benefits. Agencies responsible for its management rely extensively on advice from experts, whose preferences may or may not align with those of the community. Using a choice experiment, we compared public and expert preferences for managing the ri...
Article
Full-text available
Reef sharks may be ecologically redundant, such that other mesopredatory fishes compensate for their functions when they decline in number, preventing trophic cascades. Oral jaw gape, hereafter referred to as gape, determines maximum prey size in many piscivores and therefore affects the size structure of prey assemblages. Here, we examine whether...
Article
Many offshore oil and gas platforms around the globe are reaching their end-of-life and will require decommissioning in the next few decades. Knowledge on the ecology of offshore platforms and their ecological role within a regional context in Australia is limited and the subsequent consequences of decommissioning remain poorly understood. Remotely...
Article
Full-text available
Here we describe the first underwater sighting of Shepherd’s beaked whale (Tasmacetus shepherdi). Two individuals were observed together on video footage obtained via mid-water stereo-Baited Remote Underwater Video Systems(BRUVS) deployed off the coast of Inaccessible Island, Tristan da Cunha, in the South Atlantic. This observation constitutes the...
Article
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Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an increasingly popular, but debated, management strategy to conserve marine biodiversity and ensure sustainable human use of the oceans. Economic studies can contribute to the debate about MPAs as a management option by evaluating their benefits and costs to society. In this paper, we outline how to evaluate the e...
Article
Full-text available
Offshore oil and gas platforms are found on continental shelves throughout the world’s oceans. Over the course of their decades-long life-spans, these platforms become ecologically important artificial reefs, supporting a variety of marine life. When offshore platforms are no longer active they are decommissioned, which usually requires the removal...
Article
Full-text available
Marine plastic pollution is a symptom of an inherently wasteful linear plastic economy, costing us more than US$ 2.2 trillion per year. Of the 6.3 billion tonnes of fossil fuel-derived plastic (FFP) waste produced to date, only 9% has been recycled; the rest being incinerated (12%) or dumped into the environment (79%). FFPs take centuries to degrad...
Article
Full-text available
Within atolls, deep water channels exert significant control over local hydrodynamic conditions; which are important drivers of planktonic distributions. To examine planktonic responses to oceanography, this study tested the effect of proximity and exposure to deep oceanic flushing through these channels on water properties and planktonic assemblag...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1950s, industrial fisheries have expanded globally, as fishing vessels are required to travel further afield for fishing opportunities. Technological advancements and fishery subsidies have granted ever-increasing access to populations of sharks, tunas, billfishes, and other predators. Wilderness refuges, defined here as areas beyond the...
Article
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Here we outline the genesis of Seamap Australia, which integrates spatial data of the seabed of Australia’s continental shelf (0–200 m depth) from multiple sources to provide a single national map layer of marine habitat. It is underpinned by a hierarchical classification scheme with registered vocabulary, enabling presentation of nationally consis...
Article
Full-text available
Reef sharks are vulnerable predators experiencing severe population declines mainly due to overexploitation. However, beyond direct exploitation, human activities can produce indirect or sublethal effects such as behavioral alterations. Such alterations are well known for terrestrial fauna but poorly documented for marine species. Using an extensiv...
Article
Full-text available
Marine fisheries are in crisis, requiring twice the fishing effort of the 1950s to catch the same quantity of fish, and with many fleets operating beyond economic or ecological sustainability. A possible consequence of diminishing returns in this race to fish is serious labour abuses, including modern slavery, which exploit vulnerable workers to re...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Australia’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is the third largest maritime territory in the world. Monitoring its dynamics is fundamental to understanding and reporting on how the ocean is responding to human pressures and global environmental change. Increasingly stringent conservation budgets, however, are placing a strong emphasis on strategic reso...
Article
Full-text available
Postwar growth of industrial fisheries catch to its peak in 1996 was driven by increasing fleet capacity and geographical expansion. An investigation of the latter, using spatially allocated reconstructed catch data to quantify “mean distance to fishing grounds,” found global trends to be dominated by the expansion histories of a small number of di...
Article
Full-text available
Reliable abundance estimates for species are fundamental in ecology, fisheries, and conservation. Consequently, predictive models able to provide reliable estimates for un- or poorly-surveyed locations would prove a valuable tool for management. Based on commonly used environmental and physical predictors, we developed predictive models of total fi...
Data
Summary of test results when including a model with a quadratic term for rugosity in the model set, i.e., Model 13 poly (rugosity,2), for NR predicting total fish abundance (Ntotal) and abundance by fish family to Ningaloo Reef Shown are the two best performing models according to the weights of the Akaike Information Criteria corrected for small s...
Data
Location of the sampling sites where fish data were collected in (A) Ningaloo Reef (adapted from Sequeira et al., 2016) and (B) the Great Barrier Reef
Data
Ranges of predictor variables: (A) Sampled locations in Ningaloo Reef, and (B) All locations in Ningaloo Reef
Data
Prediction of total fish abundance (Ntotal) and fish abundance by fish family to Ningaloo Reef by all the transferred models from the GreatBarrier Reef (i.e., by all scenarios)
Data
Latitude degrees are shown in y-axis. The longitude in the GBR spans 130 to 140 degrees. For maximum and minimum prediction values refer to Table 2
Data
Data tables for the GBR and NR including all the predictors considered as well as the total abundances and abundances by fish family in each reef
Chapter
Full-text available
With over 70 contributors from 30 agencies, the NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub has developed a suite of field manuals to describe a nationally consistent and defensible approach to marine data acquisition. This manual relates to pelagic (mid-water) BRUVS, i.e. gear designed to acquire digital video imagery of macro-organisms living in the ocean’s w...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Cetaceans are some of the most iconic animals on the planet, yet few of the 45 species of whales, dolphins and porpoises known to occur in Australian waters have been extensively studied to date. Historical commercial whaling records and recent modelling studies suggest that the submarine canyons within and around the Bremer Marine Park provide fav...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Approximately 70 kilometres south-east of Bremer Bay (119.4°E, 34.4°S) off southern Western Australia’s coast lies a group of submarine canyons that incise the continental slope, plunging to depths of more than 1,000 metres. Charismatic pelagic organisms such as cetaceans, sharks, seabirds and squid are known to concentrate in high abundance above...
Book
Full-text available
Australia has one of the world’s largest marine estates that includes many vulnerable habitats and a high biodiversity, with many endemic species crossing a wide latitudinal range. The marine estate is used by a variety of industries including fishing, oil & gas, and shipping, in addition to traditional, cultural, scientific and recreational uses....
Article
Entrainment of growth patterns of multiple species to single climatic drivers can lower ecosystem resilience and increase the risk of species extinction during stressful climatic events. However, predictions of the effects of climate change on the productivity and dynamics of marine fishes are hampered by a lack of historical data on growth pattern...
Article
Evidence from the wild as to the ecological and evolutionary consequences of top predator depletions remains limited, especially in marine systems. Given the pace and extent of predator loss, an understanding of these processes is important. Two sets of adjacent coral reef systems off north-western Australia have similar biological, physical and en...
Article
Tuna, billfish, and oceanic sharks [hereafter referred to as 'mobile oceanic fishes and sharks' (MOFS)] are characterised by conservative life-history strategies and highly migratory behaviour across large, transnational ranges. Intense exploitation over the past 65 years by a rapidly expanding high-seas fishing fleet has left many populations depl...
Article
Full-text available
Tiger sharks were sampled off the western (Ningaloo Reef, Shark Bay) and eastern (the Great Barrier Reef; GBR, Queensland and New South Wales; NSW) coastlines of Australia. Multiple tissues were collected from each shark to investigate the effects of location, size and sex of sharks on δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N stable isotopes among these locations. Isotopic c...
Article
Full-text available
Reef sharks are declining world-wide under ever-increasing fishing pressure, with potential consequences on ecosystem functioning. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are currently one of the management tools used to counteract the pervasive impacts of fishing. However, MPAs in which reef sharks are abundant tend to be located in remote and underexploite...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Protected areas have become pivotal to the modern conservation planning toolbox, but a limited understanding of marine macroecology is hampering their efficient design and implementation in pelagic environments. We explored the respective contributions of environmental factors and human impacts in capturing the distribution of an assemblage of...
Data
Sample level data for all variables used in analyses. (XLSX)
Data
Comparison of generalised linear model results of log-transformed shark abundance (MaxN) in the BMR. (DOCX)
Data
Comparison of generalised linear model results of log-transformed grey reef shark abundance (MaxN) in the BMR. (DOCX)
Data
Partial response plot for generalised linear models of log-transformed total shark abundance (a-c) and grey reef shark abundance (d-f). (TIFF)
Data
Pairplots of dependent and independent variables for univariate modelling. Lower panel gives Pearson’s correlation coefficient for each pair. (TIFF)
Data
Boxplots of continuous biological and habitat variables against habitat type. (TIFF)
Data
Site variables for univariate modelling of shark indices. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Reef sharks may influence the foraging behaviour of mesopredatory teleosts on coral reefs via both risk effects and competitive exclusion. We used a “natural experiment” to test the hypothesis that the loss of sharks on coral reefs can influence the diet and body condition of mesopredatory fishes by comparing two remote, atoll-like reef systems, th...
Data
Fig A in S1 File. Frequency distributions by size class (mm) of L. gibbus, L. decussatus, L. kasmira, M. grandoculis and L. bohar at the Scott Reefs (grey) and the Rowley Shoals (black), where the size class represents the upper limit of the values. Fig B in S1 File. Plot of the length (mm) of L. bohar vs percentage difference in weight (green), he...
Article
We investigated drivers of reef shark demography across a large and isolated marine protected area, the British Indian Ocean Territory Marine Reserve, using stereo baited remote underwater video systems. We modelled shark abundance against biotic and abiotic variables at 35 sites across the reserve and found that the biomass of low trophic order fi...
Article
Full-text available
Large-scale, unreplicated natural experiments (LUNEs) have a unique power to test hypotheses at ecologically realistic scales and have delivered insights of great power into cosmology, evolution and geology. Yet, LUNEs are relatively rare in the field of ecology and continue to meet resistance due to their lack of replication. However, in the vast...
Article
Theory predicts that loss of gape-limited sharks should lead to increases in the abundance and biomass of smaller size classes of prey. We used stereo-baited remote underwater video stations (stereo-BRUVS) and stereo diver-operated video systems (stereo-DOVS) to characterise the shark and fish assemblages on 2 remote, atoll-like reef systems in nor...
Article
Fishing and habitat degradation have increased the extinction risk of sharks, and conservation strategies recognize that survival of juveniles is critical for the effective management of shark populations. Despite the rapid expansion of marine protected areas (MPAs) globally, the paucity of shark-monitoring data on large scales (100s–1000s km) mean...
Article
The benefits of marine protected areas are difficult to estimate for mobile species, but their effectiveness can be increased if essential habitats, such as nursery areas, are protected. In the present study we examined movements of juvenile blacktip reef (Carcharhinus melanopterus) and sicklefin lemon (Negaprion acutidens) sharks in a coastal nurs...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Effective management of marine assets requires an understanding of ecosystems and the processes that influence patterns of biodiversity. Project D1 of the NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub has been collating and synthesising existing data through 2015/16, focusing on Commonwealth Marine Reserves (CMRs, now Australian Marine Parks AMPs) and Key Ecologica...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Minister for Environment and Energy, the Honourable Josh Frydenberg, committed research funds to assess the extent and likely drivers of a megafauna aggregation that is currently the focus of tourism activities south of Bremer Bay, Western Australia. Present at this location is a predictable aggregation of killer whales (Orcinus orca) amongst o...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic and modelling studies suggest that seasonal aggregations of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) at coastal sites in the tropics may be linked by migration. Here, we used photo-identification (photo-ID) data collected by both citizen scientists and researchers to assess the connectedness of five whale shark aggregation sites across the entire Ind...
Data
Appendix S1. Photo-ID sampling methods Describes photo-ID data collection for each aggregation site
Data
Appendix S2. The use of image analysis software Describes the use of I3S in the photo-ID analysis of whale sharks
Data
Figure S1. Fingerprinted standardised reference area of a whale shark Demonstrates how the whale shark images were fingerprinted to standardise the area of comparison in image analysis
Data
Figure S2. Whale shark re-sighted over a 19 year period at Ningaloo Two images from the same whale shark 19 years apart to demonstrate unchanging spot patterns
Data
Figure S3. Average yearly abundance of whale sharks at each site Differences in average yearly abundance of photographed individuals at each site