Jessica Marije Grimm

Jessica Marije Grimm
University of Groningen | RUG · Groningen Institute of Archaeology (GIA)

Doctor of Philosophy
Independent researcher compiling a database of medieval goldwork embroidery made in Europe.

About

15
Publications
1,238
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65
Citations
Introduction
Currently, I am compiling a database with all the medieval goldwork embroideries in Western Europe. After 15 years in archaeozoology, I followed my heart and trained with the Royal School of Needlework to become a professional embroideress. It is my aim to enhance the field of Art History with practical embroidery skills.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
An excavation in Holybourne, near Alton, revealed two Romano-British ditches and a timber building falling within the Roman small town at Neatham, to the west of areas previously excavated by Millett and Graham. The site lay on the south side of the line of the suggested Roman road from Neatham to Winchester, although the orientation of the ditches...
Chapter
Full-text available
A total of 3425 animal bone fragments were recovered from Early and Middle Anglo-Saxon contexts. The majority of the material (3420 fragments; 99.8%) derived from Middle Anglo- Saxon pits. Four fragments of bone were recovered from ditch fills, and from the backfill of two of the Early Anglo- Saxon graves. The general character and poor condition o...
Article
Full-text available
On the occasion of archaeobotanical and archaeo-zoological investigations of organic material filled in a hole of the kitchen wall of the castle Jever, county of Friesland, a lot of species were found which may have been related to food preparation and waste disposal. The material dates most probably into the 17th century (around 1640–1645). Combin...
Article
Full-text available
During recent years, the presence of linear ridges or islands of bone (‘buttresses’) on the anterior aspect of sheep metatarsals has assumed increased visibility in zooarchaeological studies. Although a number of causes have been suggested, the etiology and pathogenesis of this condition has remained unresolved. In this paper, the systematic analys...
Book
The detailed specialist reports in this volume cover the late Iron Age and Roman human bone and animal bone assemblages recovered during the reported excavations, as well as environmental remains and dating evidence relating to contemporary landscape, subsistence and economy. A single cremation burial and a minimum of 48 inhumation burials were rec...
Article
Full-text available
Archaeological evaluation of a small redevelopment site in Canning Town revealed a deep, well-stratified Holocene alluvial sequence (the Tilbury Formation) to 5.8m depth (-4.75m OD) over Devensian fluvial sands and gravels. A thin peat (the lower peat) at c.5.5-5.75m depth (-4.45 to-4.7m OD) contained tree trunks, some with roots attached. The laye...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper analyses the different roles of birds from three Romano-British sites near Springhead: a small town, a villa rustica and a sanctuary complex. Archaeological evidence indicates that some species were used as food, some were part of the background fauna while others featured in ritual activities.
Thesis
Full-text available
The conclusions and summary of the zooarchaeological study of the medieval animal bones from Emden are written along the lines of the three levels of research questions as proposed in chapter 1. The majority of the faunal remains derived from three major excavations in the old town centre of Emden, Lower Saxony, Germany. Two excavations, the Rosens...
Article
Full-text available
The presented study investigates the pathologically changed animal bones from medieval Emden, Germany. Conditions are described, interpreted and compared with material from Ireland (a regional study including several historical sites), Germany (early medieval Hedeby and its successor Schleswig) and The Netherlands (Roman settlement Tiel-Passewaaij)...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper concentrates on the animal bone assemblage recovered from a ritual shaft situated to the east of the sanctuary complex (Fig. 1)1. The shaft lay adjacent to a trackway where it passed through a gap in an enclosure ditch which partly surrounded the complex. The pottery assemblage from the shaft dates it to the last quarter of the 2nd centu...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Compiling a database of all the medieval goldwork embroideries in Western Europe and their published literature.