Jessica Dimka

Jessica Dimka
Oslo Metropolitan University

Doctor of Philosophy

About

53
Publications
7,339
Reads
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207
Citations
Citations since 2016
37 Research Items
201 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
Full-text available
Background Vaccination is key to reducing the spread and impacts of COVID-19 and other infectious diseases. Migrants, compared to majority populations, tend to have lower vaccination rates, as well as higher infection disease burdens. Previous studies have tried to understand these disparities based on factors such as misinformation, vaccine hesita...
Article
Full-text available
This systematic review main goal is to identify the common risk factors of obesity and COVID-19 overall, and highlight the ones related to urban settings specifically, using a syndemic framework. COVID-19 highlighted the interaction between infectious diseases and non-communicable diseases. We hypothesise that obesity and COVID-19 share determinant...
Article
Full-text available
Alves DE, Mamelund S-E, Dimka J, et al. Indigenous peoples and pandemics. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health. May 2022. doi:10.1177/14034948221087095
Article
Biological anthropologists are ideally suited for the study of pandemics given their strengths in human biology, health, culture, and behavior, yet pandemics have historically not been a major focus of research. The COVID-19 pandemic has reinforced the need to understand pandemic causes and unequal consequences at multiple levels. Insights from pas...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Vaccination is key to reduce the spread and impacts of COVID-19 and other infectious diseases. Migrants, compared to majority populations, tend to have lower vaccination rates, as well as higher infection disease burdens. Previous studies have tried to understand these disparities based on factors such as misinformation, vaccine hesitan...
Conference Paper
Invited symposium: Biocultural Approaches to Pandemic Studies: Implications for Pandemic Preparedness.
Article
Full-text available
Despite common perceptions to the contrary, pandemic diseases do not affect populations indiscriminately. In this paper, we review literature produced by demographers, historians, epidemiologists, and other researchers on disparities during the 1918–20 influenza pandemic and the Covid-19 pandemic. Evidence from these studies demonstrates that lower...
Article
Full-text available
In the absence of vaccines to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2020 governments had to respond by rely on non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs). Socioeconomic inequalities likely influenced the uptake of NPIs. Using Norwegian survey data, we study whether income was associated with increased handwashing, keeping 1 m distance, using facemasks incre...
Article
Full-text available
Objectives: Especially in traditional, rural, and low-income areas, children attend school irregularly. School-based interventions are common mitigation strategies for infectious disease epidemics, but if daily attendance is not the norm, the impact of schools on disease spread might be overestimated. Methods: We use an agent-based model of an e...
Article
Full-text available
Rural, natural resource dependent communities are especially vulnerable to climate change, and their input is critical in developing solutions, but the study of risk perception within and among vulnerable communities remains underdeveloped. Our multi-disciplinary research team used a mixed-methods approach to document, analyze, and conceptualize th...
Article
Full-text available
Tuberculosis (TB) mortality declined after the 1918 pandemic, suggesting that influenza killed those who would have died from TB. Few studies have analyzed TB as a direct risk factor for 1918 influenza morbidity and mortality by age and sex. We study the impacts of TB on influenza-like illness (% of population sick) and case fatality (% of cases dy...
Article
Agent-based simulation models are excellent tools for addressing questions about the spread of infectious diseases in human populations because realistic, complex behaviors as well as random factors can readily be incorporated. Agent-based models are flexible and allow for a wide variety of behaviors, time-related variables, and geographies, making...
Article
There is an increasing demand to ensure that emerging health technologies are patient-centred. Yet, understanding what constitutes patient-centredness can be a complex task, particularly in relation to screening technologies, where lack of patient-centred design can result in decreased compliance with screening recommendations. This holds true for...
Article
Full-text available
There are a growing number of people living with disabilities (PLWD) throughout the life course and across the disability spectrum. While much attention has been paid to environmental barriers to social participation for PLWD, apparel-related barriers have been largely overlooked. We conducted an online survey of 110 PLWD to identify challenges to...
Article
Clothing-related issues can create barriers to social participation and other desired activities for people living with disabilities and their families. The purpose of this study was to identify clothing-related barriers people living with disabilities and their families are facing. An online survey was administered to people living with disabiliti...
Article
Full-text available
Computer models have proven to be useful tools in studying epidemic disease in human populations. Such models are being used by a broader base of researchers, and it has become more important to ensure that descriptions of model construction and data analyses are clear and communicate important features of model structure. Papers describing compute...
Chapter
We use an agent-based computer simulation designed to model the spread of the 1918 influenza pandemic to address the question of whether, and if so, when disease-related mortality should be included in an epidemic model. Simulation outcomes from identical models that differ only in the inclusion or exclusion of disease-related mortality are compare...
Article
Purpose: To document apparel-related barriers faced by people with disabilities (PWD) and their families as they attempted to engage in various aspects of social participation, and explore the often invisible relationship between apparel-related barriers and disablement. Method: For this qualitative research, we used focus groups to interview PW...
Chapter
Numerous studies have addressed the characteristics and impact of the second epidemiologic transition. This chapter focuses on a novel method of studying it, agent-based modeling, that can further add to the body of knowledge about human health over time. The model is designed to address questions about the spread of the 1918 influenza pandemic in...
Article
The purpose of this article is twofold. First, the study addresses questions related to the spread and impact of the 1918 influenza pandemic in a small Newfoundland community, focusing on the role of large social institutions including an orphanage, school, and churches. Records indicate, for example, that residents of the orphanage in St. Anthony,...
Article
Full-text available
Some of the most severely affected communities in the world during the 1918-19 influenza pandemic were in Labrador and Alaska. Although these two regions are on the opposite ends of North America, a cultural continuum in the Inuit populations extends throughout the North American Arctic. Both regions contain other population groups, however, and be...

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Projects

Projects (7)
Project
1) to map the poorly understood social and medical risk factors for morbidity, compliance to the NPIs and the labour market consequences, as well as document any association between the NPIs and morbidity by social and medical at risk groups. 2) To aid policy makers in tailoring the NPIs and the economic austerity packages to reduce social inequalities, to reduce the pandemic burden and the burden from the NPIs on the economy.
Project
Primary objective: To map the poorly understood socially vulnerable risk groups in order to understand how social and ethnic disparities in exposure, susceptibility and access to care lead to social and ethnic disparities in (non) pharmaceutical interventions, pandemic outcomes and health and labor market consequences. Secondary objective: To aid policymakers in developing targeted interventions by social and ethnic status in addition to medical indications, in order to reach the WHO goal of 75% vaccine coverage during seasonal influenza, to reduce ethnic and social disparities, to save lives, reduce social and economic suffering and medical costs during epidemics and pandemics. Our project aims and objectives are therefore also closely aligned with three of the UN SDGs of reducing social inequalities (goal 10), eradication of poverty (goal 1) and ensuring good health for all (goal 3).
Project
The overarching aim of PANRISK is to study historical and modern data to enhance the understanding of social risk factors for influenza and improve pandemic preparedness. PANRISK has two interrelated overall objectives: 1) To map the poorly understood social risk groups in order to understand how social disparities leads to social disparities in influenza outcomes, vaccination uptake and repercussions of vaccination for health and mortality disparities. 2) To aid policy makers in developing targeted interventions by social indications in addition to medical indications, to reach the WHO goal of 75% vaccine coverage, to reduce social inequalities, to save lives, reduce social suffering and medical costs during outbreaks.