Jessica A Davis

Jessica A Davis
Deakin University · School of Medicine, iMPACT, Food and Mood Centre

BHlth&MedSci(Hons), BF&Nutr

About

12
Publications
2,285
Reads
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209
Citations
Introduction
Jessica Davis currently works at the Institute for Innovation in Mental and Physical Health and Clinical Treatment (iMPACT), in the School of Medicine at Deakin University. Jessica's research focused on dietary patterns, the gut microbiome, and their association with muscle health.
Additional affiliations
February 2019 - June 2019
Deakin University
Position
  • Casual academic
Description
  • Seminar tutor for undergraduate units addressing foundational research concepts and health promotion in the general public.
March 2018 - July 2019
Deakin University
Position
  • PhD Student
Description
  • Diet quality, the microbiome, and associations with muscle health.
February 2017 - October 2017
Deakin University
Position
  • Undergraduate research student
Education
January 2017 - October 2017
Deakin University
Field of study
  • The microbiome and obesity
February 2012 - October 2015
Deakin University
Field of study
January 2000 - October 2005

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
The emerging understanding of gut microbiota as ‘metabolic machinery’ influencing many aspects of physiology has gained substantial attention in the field of psychiatry. This is largely due to the many overlapping pathophysiological mechanisms associated with both the potential functionality of the gut microbiota and the biological mechanisms thoug...
Chapter
While the role of a healthy diet in the management and prevention of physical chronic disease is well established, the nascent field of nutritional psychiatry has identified that improved diet quality is associated with a reduced risk of mental disorders, and emerging clinical trial data support a causal relationship between diet quality and depres...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to investigate the relationships between diet quality, the relative abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria of the gut microbiome and muscle mass, strength and function. In this cross-sectional study, n = 490 men (64.4 ± 13.5 years) from the Geelong Osteoporosis Study provided food frequency questionnaire data, from which the Aust...
Article
Background At a population level, the relation between dairy consumption and gut microbiome composition is poorly understood. Objectives We sought to study the cross-sectional associations between individual dairy foods (i.e., milk, yogurt, and cheese), as well as total dairy intake, and the gut microbiome composition in a large, representative sa...
Article
Full-text available
A growing body of evidence suggests that diet quality may predict muscle health. This study found that a "Traditional" dietary pattern predicted greater muscle mass, and an anti-inflammatory diet predicted greater muscle mass and better muscle function over 15 years. These findings reinforce the importance of optimising dietary behaviours for healt...
Article
Numerous observational studies have investigated the role of the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®) in chronic disease risk. The aims of this umbrella review and integrated meta-analyses were to systematically synthesize the observational evidence reporting on the associations between the DII and health outcomes based on meta-analyses, and to assess...
Article
Full-text available
Low muscle mass is associated with reduced independence and increased risk for falls and fractures. Identification of modifiable risk factors for low muscle mass is thus imperative. This study aimed to examine the longitudinal relationship between both diet quality and patterns and lean mass in Australian women. Data from n=494 participants of the...
Article
Full-text available
This systematic review and meta‐analysis investigated the association between consumption of ultraprocessed food and noncommunicable disease risk, morbidity and mortality. Forty‐three observational studies were included (N = 891,723): 21 cross‐sectional, 19 prospective, two case‐control and one conducted both a prospective and cross‐sectional analy...
Article
Full-text available
The intestinal microbiome has been identified as a key modifier for a variety of health conditions. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a fast, safe, and effective means by which to modify the intestinal microbiome and potentially treat a variety of health conditions. Despite extensive research of FMT for CDI, there is a lack of c...
Article
Objective The gut bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila (A. muciniphila), has been linked to body composition and metabolism. However, the role of lifestyle factors and medication use in these relationships has not been considered. This study aimed to assess the relative abundance of A. muciniphila in participants and investigate its association with o...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Low muscle mass is associated with reduced independence and increased risk for falls and fractures. Identification of modifiable risk factors for low muscle mass is thus imperative. This study aimed to examine the longitudinal relationship between both diet quality and patterns and lean mass in Australian women.
Project
Research investigating the roles of individual nutrients in muscle health fails to account for the synergistic relationships between foods and nutrients. This study aimed to investigate the predictive value of diet quality and dietary patterns for muscle mass and function in men over a 15-year period.
Project
To identify dietary patterns and quality associated with muscle health, and whether the microbiome mediates this relationship.