Jessica Conlan

Jessica Conlan
Deakin University · Marine and Freshwater Science Research Group

About

29
Publications
33,253
Reads
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136
Citations
Citations since 2017
27 Research Items
130 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
2017201820192020202120222023051015202530

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Corals are dependent upon lipids as energy reserves to mount a metabolic response to biotic and abiotic challenges. This study profiled lipids, fatty acids, and microbial communities of healthy and white syndrome (WS) diseased colonies of Acropora hyacinthus sampled from reefs in Western Australia, the Great Barrier Reef, and Palmyra Atoll...
Article
Full-text available
To understand how environmental conditions and reproductive events affect coral energetic status, seasonal variations in lipid and fatty acid profiles of the common scleractinian coral, Acropora millepora, were studied from pre-spawning in November 2009 until post-spawning in November 2010 at Halfway Island (in the Keppel Island Group, Southern Gre...
Article
This study quantified the effects of temperature on reproduction and maternal provisioning of the ectoparasite, Neobenedenia girellae (Platyhelminthes: Monogenea), a species known to cause detrimental impacts to aquaculture fishes in tropical and subtropical environments worldwide. At 20 and 25 °C, parasites exhibited relatively slower production o...
Article
The Murray cod (Maccullochella peelii peelii), an iconic Australian freshwater fish, is subject to a small but growing aquaculture sector in Australia. Optimal larviculture techniques for this species have yet to be established, particularly with regard to the nutritional quality of starter diets. As such, optimisation of current Murray cod hatcher...
Article
Developing an optimal heterotrophic feeding regime has the potential to improve the growth and overall health of captive corals. This study evaluated the efficacy of seven unique feeding strategies for Acropora loripes, Acropora millepora, and Acropora tenuis nubbins: a novel, micro-bound diet (ATF), a novel, dissolved diet rich in long-chain polyu...
Article
Full-text available
Developing an optimal heterotrophic feeding regime has the potential to improve captive coral growth and health. This study evaluated the efficacy of three exogenous diets: Artemia nauplii (ART), a commercially available coral diet (Reef Roids) (RR), and a novel, micro-bound diet (ATF), against a comparatively natural, unfiltered seawater treatment...
Thesis
This research investigated the potential of mass-rearing tropical reef corals in captivity for the purposes of reef rehabilitation. Specifically, this PhD established groundwork information on coral nutrition, particularly in the area of lipids and fatty acids, and used this to establish optimal feeding regimes to significantly improve the growth a...
Article
Full-text available
Scleractinian corals are colonial organisms comprising multiple physiologically integrated polyps and branches. Colonialism in corals is highly beneficial, and allows a single colony to undergo several life processes at once through physiological integration and compartmentalised functioning. Elucidating differences in the biochemical composition o...
Article
Full-text available
Heterotrophic feeding in newly-settled coral planulae can potentially improve survivorship and accelerate early development in some species; however, an optimal diet to facilitate this does not currently exist. This study evaluated the efficacy of three heterotrophic feeding regimes (enriched rotifers, unfiltered seawater, and a novel, particulate...
Data
Total lipid concentration of planktonic larvae for each Acropora species (mg g AFDW-1). (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the survival of Acropora recruits (% survivors). (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the surface area gain of Acropora recruits (% gain). (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the total lipid and ash composition of Acropora recruits after 93 days. (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the fatty acid composition of Acropora loripes recruits after 93 days (mg g lipid-1 and % lipid). (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the fatty acid composition of Acropora millepora recruits after 93 days (mg g lipid-1 and % lipid). (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the proportion of fused Acropora recruits (% fused). (DOCX)
Data
Fatty acid composition of planktonic larvae for each Acropora species (mg g lipid-1 and % lipid). (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the fatty acid composition of Acropora tenuis recruits after 93 days (mg g lipid-1 and % lipid). (DOCX)
Data
Lipid class composition of planktonic larvae for each Acropora species (mg g lipid-1). (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the lipid class composition of Acropora recruits after 93 days (mg g lipid-1). (DOCX)
Data
Water quality analyses of CTL and RAW seawater. (DOCX)
Data
Effect of different feeding regimes on the fatty acid composition of Acropora hyacinthus recruits after 93 days (mg g lipid-1 and % lipid). (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Lipids are involved in a host of biochemical and physiological processes in corals. Therefore, changes in lipid composition reflect changes in the ecology, nutrition, and health of corals. As such, accurate lipid extraction, quantification, and identification is critical to obtain comprehensive insight into a coral’s condition. However, discrepanci...
Data
Raw data, proximate, lipid class, and fatty acid results
Data
Supplementary Tables 1 and 2 Table S1 - Lipid class composition of intact samples of four scleractinian species prepared with crushing method. Table S2 - Major fatty acid class composition of intact samples of four scleractinian species prepared with crushing method.

Questions

Questions (10)
Question
Hello, my lab is trying to separate amino acids using an Agilent HPLC with diode array detector. We are able to separate 17 amino acids, and 16 of these are perfectly accurate with the known concentrations of our samples. But Histidine continues to be far lower than the known concentration! This is using calculations from both standard curves and internal standards (Norvaline). We have tried many things but nothing works. Does anyone have any insight for problems relating to histidine?? Details below, let me know if you need more. Thanks very much.
We are acid hydrolysing samples containing 5.0 mg of protein with 1.0 mL of 6 N HCl in vacuum-sealed hydrolysis vials at 110°C for 22 h. The amino acids are determined by reverse phase HPLC after pre-column derivatization of o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) and fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC). 2.5µL of 0.4M Borate buffer (pH = 10.4), 1.0µL of sample, 0.5µL of OPA reagent [purchased from Agilent], 0.4µL of FMOC reagent (purchased from Agilent) and 32µL of injection diluent were mixed prior to run with 20µL of the final solution injected into the HPLC.
Question
Hello,
My experimental design consists of 5 dietary treatments. Treatment 1 contains 100% of algal species 1, Treatment 2 contains 75% of algal species 1 and 25% algal species 2, and so on until Treatment 5. So my treatments are proportions of algal species giving 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100. This is essentially a dose-response design, but I'm not sure what the technical description might be?
Thank you
Question
I have ocean water temperatures taken at a depth of 2.9 metres. Could this be reported as sea surface temperature? Thanks
Question
I have conducted a feeding trial on an aquaculture(d) organism and analysed the results for total lipid, total protein, lipid classes, and fatty acids.The results show that the diets likely caused a nutritional overload of the digestive system, being too high in both protein and lipid, and there is a strong correlation with high lipid and low growth.
The lipid component of the diet was largely neutral lipids, and I have found several studies describing the growth-depressing effect of an over-supply of neutral lipids. However, these studies show that an over-supply of neutral lipids leads to increased deposition of neutral lipids, largely in the form of triacylglycerol (TAG). In my results, the organisms fed the high-lipid diets have deposited huge amounts of phospholipids, and contain very little TAG.
Generally large amounts of structural lipids in a stressed animal would indicate catabolism of storage lipids for energy, but this would also lead to lowered total lipid. In my case, I have very high total lipid concentrations.
If anyone could float some ideas as to why this might be the case I would really appreciate it. Thanks
Question
I am wondering what is the most efficient way to export peak reports using the EDAQ Powerchrom software? I know you can go to Edit> Export Reports, then paste the result in an Excel workbook. But this doesn't contain the sample names from the Sample Table, meaning they have to be copied and pasted separately and manually matched back up. This is all so counter intuitive and frustrating. Does anyone have any better techniques? I am conducting thin layer chromatography of lipid classes. Many thanks
Question
Hi, I am using the analyses; Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) and Similarity Percentages - species contributions (SIMPER) in the stats program, PRIMER. However, I prefer to use R and was wondering what the equivalent functions were? I believe the vegan package is where one goes for permutational analyses but am not sure which functions to use. Any help would be appreciated. Cheers

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