Jessica Bell Rizzolo

Jessica Bell Rizzolo
The Ohio State University | OSU · School of Environment and Natural Resources

PhD

About

22
Publications
8,964
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
109
Citations
Introduction
I am a Postdoctoral Scholar in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at The Ohio State University. I hold a Dual PhD in Sociology and Environmental Science and Policy, with a specialization in Animal Studies. My research interests include the illegal wildlife trade, wildlife tourism, and the links between wildlife commodification (wildlife farming and wildlife tourism), legal context, and wildlife consumption. I am also director of the Asian Elephant Program at the Kerulos Center.

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
The notion that indigenous people and local communities can effectively prevent conservation crime rests upon the assumption that they are informal guardians of natural resources. Although informal guardianship is a concept typically applied to “traditional” crimes, urban contexts, and the global North, it has great potential to be combined with fo...
Article
Full-text available
The scope, scale, and socio-environmental impacts of wildlife crime pose diverse risks to people, animals, and environments. With direct knowledge of the persistence and dynamics of wildlife crime, protected area rangers can be both an essential source of information on, and front-line authority for, preventing wildlife crime. Beyond patrol and cri...
Article
Full-text available
The scant existent literature on the link between wildlife tourism and consumption relies on case studies and does not directly measure attitudes towards wildlife tourism or consumption. This paper uses empirical survey data (N = 12,378) from 12 countries in Europe, Asia, and the Americas to examine the links between wildlife tourism and wildlife c...
Article
Full-text available
Many wildlife species are impacted by unsustainable consumption. Wildlife is consumed for such diverse purposes as food, medicine, ornamentation, entertainment, and social status. However, it is still debated whether legalization and wildlife farming can saturate demand and thus reduce poaching, or if these policies increase demand, and subsequentl...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter considers the recent rise of the selfie safari and the related adverse environmental and animal welfare impacts. Reflecting on the tourism market as well as sociological, cultural and environmental trends that will affect selfie safaris in the future, this chapter constructs a utopian scenario, a dystopian scenario and other plausible...
Article
Full-text available
Wildlife farming, the commercial breeding and legal sale of non-domesticated species, is an increasingly prevalent, persistently controversial, and understudied conservation practice. The adoption or rejection of wildlife farms is a complex process that incorporates numerous ethical considerations: conservation, livelihoods, animal welfare, and cul...
Article
Full-text available
Baker and Winkler (2020) advocate a rehabilitation program that would end the oppression of elephants-not by severing human-elephant relations, but by enabling human-bonded elephants to live a full life. We consider this program within a compassionate conservation framework, which recognises all sentient beings as persons. From this vantage point,...
Article
Full-text available
The keeping of exotic species as companion animals has increased over the years. In Europe and the USA, over one third of all pets are exotic. This number does not account for the large number of illegal exotic pets. This trend has stark implications for public health, animal welfare and species conservation.
Article
Full-text available
Conservation biology is a discipline with the explicit goal of protecting species from extinction. We examine how conservation biologists represent at-risk species, how they navigate values and ethical tensions in the discipline, and how they might be more effective in reaching conservation goals. While these topics are discussed in the literature,...
Chapter
Full-text available
Prior scientific analysis has demonstrated the presence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in African elephants (Loxodonta africana) due to human activities (Bradshaw et al., 2005). However, only limited attention has been directed to the effects of captivity on elephant psychologically-mediated health. This is the first study to formally ass...
Chapter
Full-text available
Juxtaposing nonhuman animal and human infant research reveals how methodological ideologies and presuppositions about mind and behavior in nonverbal subjects are impacted by the species of the experimental subject. This paper uses Critical Discourse Analysis to analyze a sample of influential scientific articles (N=40) published between 1959 and 20...
Article
Visual depictions of animals can alter human perceptions of, emotional responses to, and attitudes toward animals. Our study addressed the potential of a slideshow designed to activate emotional responses to animals to foster feelings of kinship with them. The personal meaning map measured changes in perceptions of animals. The participants were 51...
Chapter
Recent work on the human dimensions of wildlife has documented the ways in which discourse shapes and maintains social representations of wildlife (e.g. Miller 2005). Although there has been much research on public attitudes towards wolves, there has been little in-depth work on how discourse (particularly online discourse) reveals and contributes...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
I am interested in how culture and stigma influence attitudes towards wildlife consumption and crime and how the stigma effect can be leveraged in order to help reduce demand for wildlife products.