Jesse Gates

Jesse Gates
Nankai University | NKU · School of Literature

Doctor of Philosophy

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12
Publications
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31
Citations
Introduction
PhD in linguistics. Dissertation: A grammar of Mazur Stau.

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
This paper offers new evidence from Stau, Geshiza, and Khroskyabs to address the question of directionality in valency-changing derivations in Sino-Tibetan. Examining Stau, Geshiza, and Khroskyabs causative and anticausative verb stem pairs adds to the evidence that in Proto-Sino-Tibetan, a number of intransitive stems are derived from transitive s...
Article
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This paper proposes that Tangut should be classified as a West Gyalrongic language in the Sino-Tibetan/Trans-Himalayan family. We examine lexical commonalities, case marking, partial reduplication, and verbal morphology in Tangut and in modern West Gyalrongic languages, and point out nontrivial shared innovations between Tangut and modern West Gyal...
Preprint
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This paper offers new evidence from Stau, Geshiza, and Khroskyabs to address the question of directionality in valency-changing derivations in Sino-Tibetan. Examining Stau, Geshiza, and Khroskyabs causative and an-ticausative verb stem pairs adds to the evidence that in Proto-Sino-Tibetan a number of intransitive stems are derived from transitive s...
Article
Full-text available
Guiqiong, like most Sino-Tibetan languages, presents a rich array of relativization constructions. Based on both natural oral texts and elicited material, the present paper describes all attested types of relatives in Guiqiong, including prenominal, head-internal, headless, and double-headed relative clauses, as well as nominalized and non-nominali...
Article
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In this paper, we propose that in Stau (Rgyalrongic, Sino-Tibetan) there is a system of four vowel pairs (/i/-/ə/, /e/-/ɛ/, /æ/-/ɑ/, /u/-/o/) that undergo regressive vowel harmony. This system of vowel harmony produces root morpheme forms such as [æCæ] and [ɑCɑ], whereas forms like [æCɑ] or [ɑCæ] are remarkably absent. Vowel harmony is also observe...
Article
This paper presents the first documentation and analysis of a typologically remarkable process of verbal triplication in the Stau language (Sino-Tibetan). Moreover, Stau's triplication of verbs to index multiple agents (S/A) is also used pragmatically to highlight those agents. Stau's verbal triplication, although unique in many regards, falls into...
Book
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The language varieties classified under the official ISO heading Jiarong [ISO 639-3: jya], a.k.a. rGyalrong, spoken in parts of the mountainous north-western Sìchuān province of China, have been generally accepted as a single, distinct, synchronic language belonging to the rGyalrongic subgroup within Tibeto-Burman. The research provided in this the...
Article
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Dialectology as Dialectic (D as D henceforth) by Jamin Pelkey (JP henceforth) is a revision of JP's 2008 Ph.D. dissertation entitled The Phula languages in synchronic and diachronic perspective. D as D is published within the prolific Trends in Linguistics series by De Gruyter Mouton as the 229th of 280 volumes to date. The editors of the series re...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Write a detailed reference grammar of the Stau language describing all the known structures in the language.