Jesamine C Bartlett

Jesamine C Bartlett
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research | NINA · Department of Terrestrial Biodiversity

Doctor of Philosophy
Anthropogenic impacts on above-below systems (non-natives, LUC, disturbance, management, policy for nature & climate)

About

24
Publications
14,250
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72
Citations
Introduction
Very interdisciplinary approaches to anthropogenic influence on ecosystems and environmental services. Trained physiologist and entomologist, accidental botanist, chemistry fan-girl. Current favourite discipline is biogeochemistry in upland & alpine restoration (Hi Carbon!), and the impacts of invasive species on polar regions (Hello Nitrogen!). Policy engagement & implementation mixed with scicomm as my side hustle. www.jesaminebartlett.com and www.polaralienhunters.com

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Correlative species distribution models (SDMs) are subject to substantial spatio‐temporal limitations when historical occurrence records of data‐poor species provide incomplete and outdated information for niche modelling. Complementary mechanistic modelling techniques can, therefore, offer a valuable contribution to underpin more physiologically i...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report discusses approximate estimations of the carbon budgets within Norway’s mainland ecosystems. It stands as an initial overview of the natural potential of carbon storage and sequestration in Norwegian ecosystems. We describe carbon cycling in five key ecosystem groups: forest, alpine and cryosphere, agriculture and grassland, wetland, an...
Article
Full-text available
The flightless midge Eretmoptera murphyi is thought to be continuing its invasion of Signy Island via the treads of personnel boots. Current boot-wash biosecurity protocols in the Antarctic region rely on microbial biocides, primarily Virkon® S. As pesticides have limited approval for use in the Antarctic Treaty area, we investigated the efficacy o...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Rising human activity in the Arctic, combined with a warming climate, increases the probability of introduction and establishment of alien plant species. While settlements are known hotspots for persistent populations, little is known about colonization of particularly susceptible natural habitats. Systematic monitoring is lacking and avai...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has considerably dominated science-policy dialogue, public debate, and subsequently environmental policies since the three “Rio Conventions” were born. This has led to practically independent courses of action of climate change mitigation and biodiversity conservation actions, neglecting potential conflicts among outcomes and with mi...
Article
There is a need for large-scale demonstrations to address the challenges and possibilities for upscaling of ecosystem restoration, and for learning and sharing knowledge across professions and habitats. Large-scale and complex restoration projects need new perspectives on goal formulation, indicators for success, and evaluation to encompass both sc...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Surveying and monitoring biodiversity using new technology: eDNA and camera trapping. NINA Report 1962. Norwegian Institute for Nature Research. Norway has committed to halting the loss of biodiversity. However, preserving biodiversity requires knowledge about species distributions. For some species we have good knowledge of distribution and popul...
Article
Full-text available
The non-native midge Eretmoptera murphyi is Antarctica’s most persistent non-native insect and is known to impact the terrestrial ecosystems. It inhabits by considerably increasing litter turnover and availability of soil nutrients. The midge was introduced to Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, from its native South Georgia, and routes of dispersa...
Article
Full-text available
An insect’s ability to tolerate winter conditions is a critical determinant of its success. This is true for both native and invasive species, and especially so in harsh polar environments. The midge Eretmoptera murphyi (Diptera, Chironomidae) is invasive to maritime Antarctic Signy Island, and the ability of fourth instar larvae to tolerate freezi...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the physiology of non-native species in Antarctica is key to elucidating their ability to colonise an area, and how they may respond to changes in climate. Eretmoptera murphyi is a chironomid midge introduced to Signy Island (Maritime Antarctic) from South Georgia (Sub-Antarctic) where it is endemic. Here, we explore the tolerance of...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge of the life cycles of non-native species in Antarctica is key to understanding their ability to establish and spread to new regions. Through laboratory studies and field observations on Signy Island (South Orkney Islands, maritime Antarctic), we detail the life stages and phenology of Eretmoptera murphyi (Schaeffer 1914), a brachypterous...
Article
Full-text available
This correction serves to provide the correct rendering of Fig. 1a, with its respective insets corrected to show both the South Orkney Islands and Signy Island (not shown in the original article but showing in the corrected figure below).
Presentation
Full-text available
Some results of 2016/17 Eretmoptera murphyi distribution survey and early results of the tophic impacts the midge is having on Signy Island, with a particular focus on nitrogen levels. Full data set on impacts to be presented at the BES 2018 conference in December.
Poster
Full-text available
Antarctica is the least invaded continent on the planet, but over the last few decades it has experienced increased occurrences of alien invasions. Here we investigate a terrestrial invader, the midge Eretmoptera murphyi (Chironomidae), and present an update on its distribution on Signy Island whilst evaluating its risk of expansion to the rest of...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Hi RG people,
I've been calculating invertebrate abundance through collecting soil cores and then correcting the number of inverts against the dry mass of the core collected. I started doing this as the soils are shallow (polar) so depth variable. However, most of the inverts are closer to the surface (collembola, mites, diptera larvae).
On inspection of the data the mass correction is quite drastic, turning non-mass corrected sites from high to low abundance and vice versa.
What do you think? Mass correct, or not?
Look forward to hearing your thoughts!
Question
Hi All,
I have a data set of 88 quadrats that includes binary data on the presence or absence of certain substrate elements (soil, peat, moss, stone etc), and also counts for the abundance of an invasive species. The presence absence data is 1/0 and the abundance ranges from 0-150000. Ive log transformed the abundance data to start, and have run some linear models to see if there is any correlation of abundance with substrate type, as well as a PCA to look for any clustering. But Im not convinced by the outputs.
Im now just stripping it right back and looking at the number of occurences of populations above and below a certain threshold (ie: high population vs low pop.) in association with a substrate type or combination.
What other ways are there that I could analyse this data?
Much appreciated
Jes

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Investigating the life history, phenology and physiology of Eretmoptera murphyi and the ecological impacts of its introduction to Signy Island.