Jerry Bromenshenk

Jerry Bromenshenk
University of Montana | UMT · Division of Biological Sciences

Ph.D. Entomology

About

47
Publications
7,661
Reads
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873
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 1973 - present
University of Montana
Position
  • On-Line Instructor
Description
  • Lead Instructor for UM's Master Beekeeping Course Series offered for Certificate or for University Level Academic Credit. Focus is on Fact Based Bee Biology and Bee Management.
July 1973 - December 2015
University of Montana
Position
  • Ecologist/Research Professor/Research Director
Education
September 1964 - December 1972
Eastern Montana College, Montana State University
Field of study
  • Biology, Entomology + Minors in Biochemistry and Philosophy

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
Full-text available
This review focuses on critical milestones in the development path for the use of bees, mainly honey bees and bumble bees, as sentinels and biosensors. These keystone species comprise the most abundant pollinators of agro-ecosystems. Pollinating 70%-80% of flowering terrestrial plants, bees and other insects propel the reproduction and survival of...
Article
Surveillance of unwanted organisms without lures is one of the greatest challenges in biosecurity Previous work in the USA has shown that honey bees (Apis mellifera) can be trained to detect land mines Based on this successfully proven method the possibility of detecting key species of agricultural and biosecurity interest in a field environment wa...
Article
Full-text available
A biological detection scheme based on the natural foraging behavior of conditioned honeybees for detecting chemical vapor plumes associated with unexploded ordnance devices utilizes a scanning lidar instrument to provide spatial mapping of honeybee densities. The scanning light detection and ranging (lidar) instrument uses a frequency doubled Nd:Y...
Article
Full-text available
Two types of macroscopic lesions, basal blister and basal necrosis, disrupting the surface tissues of Pinus needles under the fascicular sheath, are described in detail for the first time. In basal blister, hypertrophy and hyperplasia o mesophyll parenchyma cause an oval to elliptical bulge on the needle surface with a longitudinal split of the epi...
Article
Full-text available
Long-wave infrared imaging is used for non-invasive assessment of the internal population of honey bee colonies. The radiometrically calibrated camera signal is related to the number of frames that are populated by bees inside each hive. This enables rapid measurement of population without opening the hive, which disturbs the bees and can endanger...
Article
Full-text available
A consistent marker for Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in the honeybee has been detected and identified by Mass Spectrometry based proteomics (MSP). The analysis of honeybees from commercial apiaries across the United States and from a research observation hive discovered an iridescent virus (Iriodoviridae, IIV) that was significantly discriminated...
Article
Full-text available
In 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), again devastated honey bee colonies in the USA, indicating that the problem is neither diminishing nor has it been resolved. Many CCD investigations, using sensitive genome-based methods, have found small RNA bee viruses and the microsporidia, Nosema apis and N. ceranae in healthy and collapsing colonies alik...
Article
Full-text available
A polarization-sensitive lidar was used to detect honeybees trained to locate buried landmines by smell. Lidar measurements of bee location agree reasonably well with maps of chemical plume strength and bee density determined by visual and video counts, indicating that the bees are preferentially located near the explosives and that the lidar ident...
Article
Full-text available
A scanning polarized lidar was used to detect flying honey bees trained to locate buried land mines through odor detection. A lidar map of bee density shows good correlation with maps of chemical plume strength and bee density determined by visual and video counts. The co-polarized lidar backscatter signal was found to be more effective than the cr...
Article
Tethered honey bees (Apidea Apis melifera) coaxed to fly in a miniature wind tunnel for a specific time interval, adsorb a virus (i.e., bacteriophage MS2) aerosol at a linear rate of 1% of the aerosol concentration for every 6.73 pC of electrostatic charge on the bee.
Article
An aerosol cloud of Bacillus atrophaeus (previously B. subtilis variety niger) spores, an anthrax surrogate, was created in a large 0.4ha (1 ac), bee-containing, open-mesh tent. Bees from a B. atrophaeus uncontaminated hive flying through the cloud adsorbed the spores in statistically significant quantities. After removal of the B. atrophaeus conta...
Article
Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been collaborating with the University of Montana's (UM) engineered honeybee colony research under DARPA's Controlled Biological and Biomimetric Systems (CBBS) program. Prior work has shown that the monitoring of contaminants that are returned to a hive by honeybees (Apis mellifera) provides a rapid, inexpensi...
Chapter
The products of honey bees can be used as indicators and monitors of a variety of environmental pollutants because of the bees ability to collect materials that reflect their immediate environment conditions. The area covered by honey bees in their nectar- or honeydew-gathering process can be presented as a circle with a few kilometres radius. It s...
Article
Full-text available
It has been shown that honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) adsorb bacterial spores as a function of the electrostatic charge on the bee and concentration of bacteria in the aerosol during tethered flight in wind tunnel experiments. This report presents a mathematical model for predicting the number of spores that could be adsorbed onto free-flying bees...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are multi-media monitors of chemical exposures and biotic effects. This six-year project has developed an automated system to assess in real-time colony behavioral responses to stressors, both anthropogenic and natural, including inclement weather. It also addressed chemical exposures by measuring the concentrations o...
Article
Full-text available
An air conditioned wind tunnel system was designed, fabricated, and tested to determine whether tethered bees scavenge microbeads or Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores from aerosols. Tests showed that microbeads and spores were scavenged by bumblebees and honeybees, respectively. Five independent variables and their interactions were used in a ste...
Article
Full-text available
Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are multi-media monitors of chemical exposures and biotic effects. This six-year project has developed an automated system to assess in real time colony behavioral responses to stressors, both anthropogenic and natural, including inclement weather. 1999 field trials at the Aberdeen Proving Ground- Edgewood area includ...
Article
Full-text available
This research compared the transfer of 137Cs, 40K, Ca, Fe, Rb, Sr, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Mn and Cr from soil into honey derived from meadow flora, mixtures of floral and honeydew honey, and honeydew honey from fir and spruce forests in Gorski Kotar, Croatia. Radionuclides were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry, while other element concentrations were me...
Article
Based on residue concentrations in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.), we mapped the spatial distribution of fluoride across much of the upper Snake River Plain in southeastern Idaho. Our results suggest that facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) intermittently release this chemical. These emissions affect localized areas on th...
Article
Computer simulation models can provide exceptional tools for research and teaching. Honey bee colonies furnish excellent examples of the basic principles of biology, entomology, and population ecology. We fused these two powerful educational tools and created an interactive program called PC BEEPOP for IBM-compatible personal computers. This articl...
Article
The Montana DOE/EPSCoR planning process has made significant changes in the state of Montana. This is exemplified by notification from the Department of Energy`s Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (DOE/EPSCoR) recommendation to fund Montana`s 1992 graduate traineeship grant proposal in the amount of $500,000. This is a new award...
Chapter
Some types of environmental contamination are contained or follow known distribution patterns such as drainage systems. They can be monitored through the sampling of specific media such as air, water, or soil at fixed locations. However, in other cases the sources and extent of the contamination are not known. To delineate the area impacted, sampli...
Article
PC BEEPOP is a computer model that simulates honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colony population dynamics. The model consists of a feedback system of interdependent elements, including colony condition (e.g., initial size, reproductive potential of the queen and forager longevity), environmental variability (e.g., weather) and contaminant exposures. It...
Article
Full-text available
Nucleus colonies (nucs) of c4500 Apis mellifera were evaluated as an alternative to full-size colonies for monitoring pollution impacts. Fifty nucs were deployed at five sites along a transect on Vashon Island, Washington. This provided a gradient of exposure to arsenic and cadmium from industrial sources. After 40d, statistically significant diffe...
Article
PC BEEPOP is a computer model that simulates honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colony population dynamics. The model consists of a feedback system of interdependent elements, including colony condition (e.g., initial size, reproductive potential of the queen and forager longevity), environmental variability (e.g., weather) and contaminant exposures. It...
Article
Areas of comb can be used to assess qualities of honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colony dynamics such as brood rearing, hoarding behavior, and food stores. Visual estimates, grid overlays, photography, and combinations of these methods have been used to approximate measurements of comb areas. The development of portable computers with graphics and la...
Article
Large-scale environmental monitoring programs rely on sampling many media -- air, water, food, et cetera -- from a large network of sampling stations. For describing the total region possibly impacted by contaminants, the most efficient sampler would be one that covered a large region and simultaneously sampled many different media, such as water,...
Article
In the Puget Sound region of the United States a task force of community volunteers using bees monitored environmental pollution. This paper discusses advantages and limitations of public involvement in the assessment of regional environmental problems, particularly with respect to biological monitoring. This approach not only yielded extensive inf...
Article
To show that honey bees are effective biological monitors of environmental contaminants over large geographic areas, beekeepers of Puget Sound, Washington, collected pollen and bees for chemical analysis. From these data, kriging maps of arsenic, cadmium, and fluoride were generated. Results, based on actual concentrations of contaminants in bee ti...
Conference Paper
The objectives are to provide a tool for assessing pollutant distributions and the effects of pollutants on living systems. The potential of bees as pollution monitors was studied by examining bees exposed to toxic metals near a smelter in Montana and bees in the area surrounding a hazardous waste disposal site near Puget Sound, Washington. Levels...
Conference Paper
Each year thousands of chemicals in large quantities are introduced into the global environment and the need for effective methods of monitoring these substances has steadily increased. Most monitoring programs rely upon instrumentation to measure specific contaminants in air, water, or soil. However, it has become apparent that humans and their en...
Article
There are four primary objectives in this study: 1. Baseline survey of flora and fauna at the Ranch; 2. The extent and severity of heavy metal contamination throughout the Ranch; 3. An evaluation of areas along the Clark Fork River within the Ranch that are denuded of vegetation or have little vegetative cover; and 4. To provide a list of possible...
Article
This research project has two primary objectives. The first, which has been funded for the growing season of 1983, is to furnish a core of basic data essential to proper management. of the historic site. This includes surveys of plants and animals to identify species which currently exist, their relative abundances and distributions, the occurrence...
Article
Can honey bees be used as collectors of atmospheric microbial agents of harm? Individual tethered honey bees were flown in a mini wind tunnel and exposed to a cloud of aerosolized bacterial spores (an Anthrax simulant). The bees adsorbed bacterial spores proportional to the measured electrostatic charge on the bee and to the aerosol exposure dose....
Article
Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) have been shown to be multi-media monitors of chemical exposures and resultant effects. This five-year project has developed an automated system to assess in real-time colony behavioral responses to stressors, both anthropogenic and natural, including inclement weather. Field trials at the Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edge...

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