Jérôme Gippet

Jérôme Gippet
University of Lausanne | UNIL · Department of Ecology and Evolution

PhD
PostDoc in Bertelsmeier group -- Human-mediated dispersal, myrmecology, global pet trade

About

21
Publications
5,554
Reads
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197
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
197 Citations
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Introduction
I am interested by the links between human activities and biological invasions, with a particular focus on human-mediated dispersal processes. During my PhD, I studied the consequences of urbanization on biological communities composition, invasive species secondary spread and intraspecific variations among urban and rural ant populations. My current research projects focus on the global pet trade and how it is associated with biological invasions.
Education
September 2013 - December 2016
Claude Bernard University Lyon 1
Field of study
  • Urban ecology and Biological invasions

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
The global pet trade is a major risk to biodiversity and humans. Over the recent decades, the pet trade has become increasingly globalized, diversified, digitalized and extremely difficult to control. With billions of Internet users posting online daily, social media could serve as a powerful surveillance tool. But it is still unknown how reliable...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the status and abundance of species is essential for effective conservation decision-making. However, the availability of species data varies across space, taxonomic groups and data types. A case study was therefore conducted in a high biodiversity region—East Africa—to evaluate data biases, the factors influencing data availability,...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat anthropization is a major driver of global biodiversity decline. Although most species are negatively affected, some benefit from anthropogenic habitat modifications by showing intriguing life-history responses. For instance, increased recruitment through higher allocation to reproduction or improved performance during early-life stages cou...
Poster
Full-text available
Invasive species are over-represented on the exotic pet market. Using ants as a model system, we show that the pet trade not only creates opportunities for invasions, but that it also favors specifically invasive species.
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Cities are thought to promote biological invasions because invasive species are more often introduced in urban areas and because they are more successful in disturbed environments. However, the association is not as strongly supported by the literature as is generally assumed and might depend on how urbanization and invasion are measured. In t...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species often displace native species by outcompeting them. Yet, some native species can persist even in heavily invaded areas. The mechanisms mediating this local coexistence are still unclear. Fine-scale microclimatic heterogeneity could promote the local coexistence of native and invasive animal competitors. We tested if native ant spec...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Using long-term demographic studies, we showed that warmer temperatures are associated with increased senescence rates and decreased lifespans in four amphibian species that are widely distributed across two continents (North America and Europe). Our study highlights the role of changing climatic conditions in the aging of ectotherms i...
Article
Full-text available
Globalisation has facilitated the spread of alien species, and some of them have significant impacts on biodiversity and human societies. It is commonly thought that biological invasions have accelerated continuously over the last centuries, following increasing global trade. However, the world experienced two distinct waves of globalisation (~1820...
Article
Photoperiod is a major factor regulating biological rhythms in animals and plants. At low latitudes, annual variation in daylength is low and species are expected to strongly rely on photic cues to reset their circadian clocks. A corollary is that individuals should be strongly affected by sudden changes in the photic regime as those generated by a...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the distribution of parasites is crucial for biodiversity conservation. Here, we studied the distribution of the ectoparasitic fungus Laboulbenia formicarum in native and invasive Lasius ants in a 2000 km² area. We screened over 16,000 ant workers in 478 colonies of five different species. We found that Lab. formicarum was rare in nat...
Article
Full-text available
1. Temperature is a critical driver of ectotherm life history strategies, whereby a warmer environment is associated with increased growth, reduced longevity, and accelerated senescence. Increasing evidence indicates that thermal adaptation may underly such life history shifts in wild populations. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and Copy Num...
Article
Full-text available
Significance The global pet trade may accelerate the spread of invasive species around the world, which threatens native biodiversity and impacts human economy and health. Here, using an extensive metaanalysis, we show that invasive species are strongly overrepresented across mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish traded as pets. Even in th...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the mechanisms underlying population decline is a critical challenge for conservation biologists. Both deterministic (e.g. habitat loss, fragmentation, and Allee effect) andstochastic (i.e. demographic and environmental stochasticity) demographic processes are involved in population decline. Simultaneously, a decrease of population si...
Article
Full-text available
Globalization is removing dispersal barriers for the establishment of invasive species and enabling their spread to novel climates. New thermal environments in the invaded range will be particularly challenging for ectotherms, as their metabolism directly depends on environmental temperature. However, we know little about the role climatic niche sh...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental niche models predict the presence of the invasive Argentine ant in north-western Europe, especially along all the French Atlantic coast. Yet, the species has never been observed North from the 45th parallel in Europe, suggesting either that current models are wrong or that Argentine ants are already spreading north inconspicuously. He...
Preprint
Environmental niche models predict the presence of the invasive Argentine ant in north-western Europe, especially along all the French Atlantic coast. Yet, the species has never been observed North from the 45th parallel in Europe, suggesting either that current models are wrong or that Argentine ants are already spreading north inconspicuously. He...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the mechanisms underlying biological extinctions is a critical challenge for conservation biologists. Both deterministic (e.g. habitat loss, fragmentation) and stochastic (i.e. demographic stochasticity, Allee effect) demographic processes are involved in population decline. Simultaneously, a decrease of population size has far-reachi...
Article
Central to the problem of biological invasions, human activities introduce species beyond their native ranges and participate in their subsequent spread. Understanding human-mediated dispersal is therefore crucial for both predicting and preventing invasions. Here, we show that decomposing human-mediated dispersal into three temporal phases: depart...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanized landscapes are the theater of multiple simultaneous biological invasions likely to affect spread dynamics when co-occurring introduced species interact with each other. Interactions between widespread invaders call for particular attention because they are likely to be common and because non-additive outcomes of such associations might in...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is a major global change inducing complex and multiple modifications of landscapes and ecosystems. The spatial distributions of organisms experiencing these modifications will likely shift specifically, depending on each species’ response to each environmental modification induced by urbanization. We sampled two ant genera (Lasius and...
Thesis
Urbanization is a complex process involving simultaneous changes in several environmental conditions, including ground and air temperature (urban heat island effect), habitat fragmentation and chemical pollution. These changes are often associated with biodiversity loss and changes in ecosystems functioning. However, more than a sink for biodiversi...

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