Jeroen Ingels

Jeroen Ingels
Florida State University | FSU · Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory (FSUCML)

BSc, MSc, MMSc, PhD

About

120
Publications
61,373
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
3,280
Citations
Introduction
I’m a marine community ecologist with a wide interest in benthic biodiversity, ecosystem functions and processes, specialized in deep-sea ecology and meiofauna and nematode biology. A lot of my work is on finding out how organisms interact with their environment and each other, and how they can be used to 'indicate' a wide range of impacts and processes. Current research projects aim at understanding what drives benthic diversity and how it affects marine sediment functions and processes such as biogeochemical cycling and food-web flows. Other work includes the assessment of anthropogenic and climate-change impacts on marine fauna and ecosystems.
Additional affiliations
February 2017 - present
Florida State University
Position
  • Research Faculty I
January 2015 - December 2016
Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Combined with honorary status at University of Exeter as part of the Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
January 2013 - December 2014
Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Position
  • Post-doctoral Researcher - Marie Curie Fellowship
Education
June 2015 - June 2015
Barefoot thinking
Field of study
October 2013
Landd Consultancy - Plymouth Marine Laboratory
Field of study
  • Project Management (PRINCE2)
March 2013
PRIMER-E, Marine Biological Association
Field of study
  • Analysis of Multivariate Data from Ecology and Environmental Science using PRIMER v6

Publications

Publications (120)
Article
Seamounts have long been hypothesized to be biodiversity hotspots for benthic organisms, but there is limited empirical evidence to support that notion. The present study sampled meiofauna from different deep-sea sites in the Southeast Pacific Ocean (seamounts, abyssal plain, trench, island) to assess causative factors that influence meiofauna and...
Article
Full-text available
Nematodes are among the most abundant organisms on Earth, and have important roles in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Free-living marine nematodes have been used successfully as indicators of biological health and ocean pollution for at least the past 40 years, but their use as bioindicators is not ubiquitous. They have been most of...
Article
Full-text available
Sea turtles are exposed to numerous threats during migrations to their foraging grounds and at those locations. Therefore, information on sea turtle foraging and spatial ecology can guide conservation initiatives, yet it is difficult to directly observe migrating or foraging turtles. To gain insights into the foraging and spatial ecology of turtles...
Chapter
Full-text available
• The abyss lies between 3 and 6 km water depth and covers more of the Earth’s sur- face than all other habitats combined. • The present chapter is the first in the World Ocean Assessment that is dedicated to the abyss, covering biodiversity, regional dif- ferences, biogeography, and changes and impacts as a result of natural stressors and anthropo...
Book
Full-text available
The sea floor represents the largest solid ecosystem on our Planet. This heterogeneous realm consists of many different features shaped by millions of years of geological and chemical events, and biological and environmental evolution. “Extreme” benthic environments, defined as having abiotic conditions that demand organisms and resident communitie...
Article
Full-text available
The calving of A‐68, the 5,800‐km², 1‐trillion‐ton iceberg shed from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in July 2017, is one of over 10 significant ice‐shelf loss events in the past few decades resulting from rapid warming around the Antarctic Peninsula. The rapid thinning, retreat, and collapse of ice shelves along the Antarctic Peninsula are harbingers of wa...
Article
Full-text available
A better understanding of deep-sea biology requires knowledge of the structure and function of their communities, the spatial, temporal, and environmental patterns, and the changes and dynamics that govern them. Some of the most studied patterns in deep-sea biology are those related to bathymetrical gradients. For meiofauna and nematodes, such stud...
Article
Full-text available
The sea floor represents the largest ecosystem on our Planet. This heterogeneous realm consists of many different features shaped by millions of years of geological and chemical events, and biological and environmental evolution. "Extreme" benthic environments cover more than 50% of the Earth's surface and offer many opportunities for investigating...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, Danovaro et al. [1] prioritized deep-sea essential ecological variables (DEEVs), based on opinions from 112 deep-sea experts worldwide, to support development of a global deep-ocean monitoring and conservation strategy. While a set of universally important DEEVs is necessary to ensure appropriate monitoring, we challenge the conclusion th...
Article
Intertidal nematode assemblages along three beaches with different types of anthropogenic activity were collected in the northern part of the Persian Gulf, near Bandar Abbas (Iran). Forty-two genera of free-living nematodes belonging to 17 families were identified. Daptonema, Ptycholaimellus, and Promonhystera were the most abundant taxa in the are...
Article
Recent studies have increased the known diversity and distribution of kinorhynchs in the Gulf of Mexico. For this study, sediment was sampled from Alabama coastal waters at shallow depths ranging from 11 to 26 metres. The 13 stations were positioned to the west and east of the mouth of Mobile Bay as well as at central locations. A total of 320 anim...
Article
Full-text available
The composition, spatial structure, diversity and abundance of Antarctic nematode and copepod meiobenthic communities was examined in shallow (5–25 m) marine coastal sediments at Casey Station, East Antarctica. The sampling design incorporated spatial scales ranging from 10 meters to kilometers and included testing for human impacts by comparing po...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The joint ICES/NAFO Working Group on Deep-water Ecology (WGDEC) collates new information on the distribution of Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems (VMEs) for use in annual ICES advisory processes and the development of new methods/techniques to further our understanding of deep-sea ecosystems, and further suggests novel management tools to ensure human a...
Article
Full-text available
Sea turtles migrate thousands of miles annually between foraging and breeding areas, carrying dozens of epibiont species with them on their journeys. Most sea turtle epibiont studies have focused on large-sized organisms, those visible to the naked eye. Here, we report previously undocumented levels of epibiont abundance and biodiversity for logger...
Article
Full-text available
Macroalgae drive the largest CO 2 flux fixed globally by marine macrophytes. Most of the resulting biomass is exported through the coastal ocean as detritus and yet almost no field measurements have verified its potential net sequestration in marine sediments. This gap limits the scope for the inclusion of macroalgae within blue carbon schemes that...
Article
Full-text available
Free Ocean CO2 Enrichment (FOCE) experiments are a relatively recent development in ocean acidification research, designed to address the need for in situ, long-term, community level experiments. FOCE studies have been conducted across different marine benthic habitats and regions, from Antarctica to the tropics. Based on this previous research we...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding community assembly and processes driving diversity in deep-sea environments is a major challenge in marine ecosystems. In this paper, we investigated the importance of environmental gradients at different spatial scales in structuring deep-sea canyon and continental slope meiobenthic nematode communities in the NW Mediterranean Sea. T...
Article
Kinorhynchs are microscopic invertebrates that are part of the meiofaunal community. Their diversity and distribution has been relatively unstudied in the Gulf of Mexico until the past few years. Past studies from Troy University have reported 32 species of kinorhynchs in the Gulf, from Texas to Florida. This study reports a re-sampling effort whic...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean deoxygenation has become a topic of increasing concern because of its potential impacts on marine ecosystems, including oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) expansion and subsequent benthic effects. We investigated the influence of oxygen concentration and organic matter (OM) availability on metazoan meiofauna within and below an OMZ in bathyal sediment...
Article
Biological communities beneath Antarctic ice shelves remain a mystery, hampering assessment of ecosystem development after ice-shelf collapse. Here we highlight major gaps in understanding of the patterns and processes in these areas, and suggest effective ways to study the ecological impacts of ice-shelf loss under climate change.
Technical Report
Full-text available
On 5th March 2018, the joint ICES/NAFO Working Group on Deep-water Ecology (WGDEC), chaired by Neil Golding (UK) and attended by sixteen members (eleven in person, three via WebEx video conferencing and two via correspondence), met at the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organisation (NAFO) HQ in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, to consider the Terms of Referen...
Article
Full-text available
The study of meiofauna, the motile microscopic fauna of aquatic sediments, is increasingly appreciated in modern aquatic ecology. This special issue includes invited and selected papers presented at the 16th International Meiofauna Conference in Heraklion, Crete, Greece between 3rd and 8th July 2016. The collection of papers presents some of the mo...
Article
Within the framework of the DosMares project, we investigated the standing stocks, structural and functional diversity and community structure of the nematode assemblages both along a bathymetric gradient, and the vertical sediment profile (0-5. cm) in the Blanes Canyon (NW Mediterranean) during autumn 2012.The standing stocks (total density and bi...
Article
Full-text available
Extreme marine environments cover more than 50% of the Earth’s surface and offer many opportunities for investigating the biological responses and adaptations of organisms to stressful life conditions. Extreme marine environments are sometimes associated with ephemeral and unstable ecosystems, but can host abundant, often endemic and well-adapted m...
Article
Although nematodes are the most abundant metazoans in marine environments and present an important biological and ecological model organism to assess marine ecosystem processes and functions, there are in fact very few studies that use nematodes to investigate ecological communities and relationships on "mobile" ecosystems. Arguably one of the most...
Article
Full-text available
Continental shelf sediments are globally important for biogeochemical activity. Quantification of shelf-scale stocks and fluxes of carbon and nutrients requires the extrapolation of observations made at limited points in space and time. The procedure for selecting exemplar sites to form the basis of this up-scaling is discussed in relation to a UK-...
Article
Full-text available
Results from a 1D setup of the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM) biogeochemical model were compared with new observations collected under the UK Shelf Seas Biogeochemistry (SSB) programme to assess model performance and clarify elements of shelf-sea benthic biogeochemistry and carbon cycling. Observations from two contrasting sites (mu...
Article
Global concern over increasing CO2 emissions, and the resultant CO2 driven temperature rises and changes in seawater chemistry, necessitates the advancement of understanding into how these changes will affect marine life now and in the future. Here we report on an experimental investigation into the effects of increased CO2 concentration and elevat...
Article
The effects of hydrocarbons in marine sediments on Antarctic meiofaunal communities (nematodes and cope-pods) were investigated in a five year field experiment at Casey Station, East Antarctica. The effects of four different types of hydrocarbons were examined: clean mineral lube oil, used mineral lube oil, synthetic lube oil marketed as being rapi...
Article
Full-text available
The deep sea encompasses the largest ecosystems on Earth. Although poorly known, deep seafloor ecosystems provide services that are vitally important to the entire ocean and biosphere. Rising atmospheric greenhouse gases are bringing about significant changes in the environmental properties of the ocean realm in terms of water column oxygenation, t...
Article
Warming and ocean acidification have been shown to have significant impacts on marine organisms. However, none studies have addressed the impact of these two stressors on harpacticoid copepod community structure. A mesocosm experiment was conducted to assess the potential interactive impact of different levels of elevated CO2 and temperature on an...
Article
We investigated the natural and anthropogenic drivers controlling the spatiotemporal distribution of the meiofauna in the submarine Blanes Canyon, and its adjacent western slope (NW Mediterranean margin of the Iberian Peninsula). We analyzed the relationships between the main sedimentary environmental variables (i.e. grain size, Chl-a, Chl-a:phaeop...
Poster
Full-text available
Submarine canyons are probably among the most dynamic systems along continental margins resulting in high seafloor heterogeneity. Since nematode assemblages are strongly related to changes in seafloor characteristics such as sediment composition and food supply, they are expected to vary significantly along submarine canyons. By studying nematodes...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Due to the impacts of natural processes and anthropogenic activities, different coastal wetlands are faced with variable patterns of heavy metal contamination. It is important to quantify the contributions of pollutant sources, in order to adopt appropriate protection measures for local ecosystems. The aim of this research was to compare th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Astomonema is a nematode genus belonging to the family Astomonematinae, characterized by abundant endosymbiotic chemo-autotrophic bacteria located within the body. Their dependence on these prokaryote symbionts as an energy source is obvious since these nematodes lack a mouth and their pharynx is vestigial, precluding food uptake via the mouth. Unt...
Technical Report
Full-text available
On 16th February 2015, the joint ICES/NAFO WGDEC, chaired by Neil Golding (UK) and attended by fourteen members (eleven in person, three via WebEx) met in Horta, Faial, Azores to consider the terms of reference (ToR) listed in Section 2. WGDEC was requested to provide all new information on the distribution of vulnerable marine ecosystems (VMEs) in...
Technical Report
Full-text available
On the 10th December 2015, WKVME, chaired by Neil Golding (UK) and attended by eleven deep-sea and database experts, met at the JNCC Headquarters, Peterborough, to consider the terms of reference (ToR) listed in Section 2. WKVME reviewed the current ICES Vulnerable Marine Ecosystem (VME) database, focusing on the current list of VME Indicators/Habi...
Data
In the near future, the marine environment is likely to be subjected to simultaneous increases in temperature and decreased pH. The potential effects of these changes on intertidal, meiofaunal assemblages were investigated using a mesocosm experiment. Artificial Substrate Units containing meiofauna from the extreme low intertidal zone were exposed...
Article
Full-text available
Since strong regional warming has led to the disintegration of huge parts of the Larsen A and B ice shelves east of the Antarctic Peninsula in 1995 and 2002, meiofaunal communities covered by ice shelves for thousands of years could be investigated for the first time. Based on a dataset of more than 230,000 individuals, meiobenthic higher taxa dive...
Article
Full-text available
The deep sea is often viewed as a vast, dark, remote, and inhospitable environment, yet the deep ocean and seafloor are crucial to our lives through the services that they provide. Our understanding of how the deep sea functions remains limited, but when treated synoptically, a diversity of supporting, provisioning, regulating and cultural services...
Article
Diverse assemblages of infauna in sediments provide important physical and biogeochemical services, but are under increasing pressure by anthropogenic activities, such as benthic trawling. It is known that trawling disturbance has a substantial effect on the larger benthic fauna, with reductions in density and diversity, and changes in community st...
Article
Mangroves along the Sudanese Red Sea coast are under constant anthropogenic pressure. To better understand the influence of mangrove clearance on the intertidal benthic community, we investigated the composition, biodiversity and standing stock of the macrofauna communities at high-, mid- and low-water levels in three contrasting habitats: a bare s...
Article
Full-text available
The deep sea is Earth's largest habitat but little is known about the nature of deep-sea parasitism. In contrast to a few characterized cases of bacterial and protistan parasites, the existence and biological significance of deep-sea parasitic fungi is yet to be understood. Here we report the discovery of a fungus-related parasitic microsporidium,...
Article
Full-text available
The presence of macro-epibionts on turtle carapaces is a well-known phenomenon, whereby carapaces are occupied by dynamic and fully functional epibiont communities. However, meiofaunal organisms have been largely ignored in turtle shell studies despite their omnipresence and higher abundances and diversity than the macrofauna. Epifauna from the haw...