Jeroen Hubert

Jeroen Hubert
Leiden University | LEI · Institute of Biology Leiden

Doctor of Philosophy
Postdoctoral researcher in bioacoustics at Leiden University

About

29
Publications
3,221
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185
Citations

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic animals live in an acoustic world in which they often rely on sound detection and recognition for various aspects of life that may affect survival and reproduction. Human exploitation of marine resources leads to increasing amounts of anthropogenic sound underwater, which may affect marine life negatively. Marine mammals and fishes are know...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic sources increasingly contribute to the underwater soundscape and this may negatively impact aquatic life, including fish. Anthropogenic sound may mask relevant sound, alter behaviour, physiology, and may lead to physical injury. Behavioural effect studies are often seen as critical to evaluate individual and population-level impact. H...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic sound can affect fish behaviour and physiology which may affect their well-being. However, it remains a major challenge to translate such effects to consequences for fitness at an individual and population level. For this, energy budget models have been developed, but suitable data to parametrize these models are lacking. A first step...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic noise underwater is increasingly recognized as a pollutant for marine ecology, as marine life often relies on sound for orientation and communication. However, noise may not only interfere with processes mediated through sound, but also have effects across sensory modalities. To understand the mechanisms of the impact of anthropogenic...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic sound has been shown to affect marine animals across taxa. However, bivalves and other invertebrates have received limited attention, and most studies across taxa have focussed on immediate, rather than long-term, effects of sound. Most bivalves adopt a sessile or sedentary lifestyle and are therefore likely to be subject to frequent...
Thesis
Full-text available
Anthropogenic noise has been shown to affect marine animals in various ways, this may have fitness consequences at individual and population level. This thesis aims to increase insight into the quantification of sound-induced behavioural responses that are relevant to fitness, and into factors that modulate the responses. I addressed both knowledge...
Article
Geophysical exploration of the seabed is typically done through seismic surveys, using airgun arrays that produce intense, low-frequency-sound pulses¹ that can be heard over hundreds of square kilometers, 24/7.²,³ Little is known about the effects of these sounds on free-ranging fish behavior.4, 5, 6 Effects reported range from subtle individual ch...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Energy intake and expenditure data are needed to estimate population level effects of anthropogenic sound on fish. We present an experimental design of a controlled behavioral experiment that allows to collect relatively long-term data (days) on Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) during sound exposures. Data on the time spent foraging and swimming can be...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have a strong tendency to spontaneously group visual or auditory stimuli together in larger patterns. One of these perceptual grouping biases is formulated as the iambic/trochaic law, where humans group successive tones alternating in pitch and intensity as trochees (high–low and loud–soft) and alternating in duration as iambs (short–long)....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Underwater sound consists of particle motion and sound pressure. Due to technical difficulties only sound pressure is measured in most sound impact studies on fish and invertebrates. However, sound pressure alone may not adequately reflect the actual acoustic stimulus, especially in tanks, basins and near-field conditions. To test the acoustic vali...
Article
Full-text available
While humans can easily entrain their behavior with the beat in music, this ability is rare among animals. Yet, comparative studies in non-human species are needed if we want to understand how and why this ability evolved. Entrainment requires two abilities: (1) recognizing the regularity in the auditory stimulus and (2) the ability to adjust the o...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Human activities, such as shipping and pile driving, produce substantial amounts of man-made noise underwater. The noise may negatively affect fish, causing physical injuries, hearing loss, physiological stress, acoustic masking and behavioural changes. Among these effects, behavioural changes are most problematic, but are understudied, especially...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Effects of seismic sound on Atlantic cod