Jeroen A A Demmers

Jeroen A A Demmers
Erasmus MC | Erasmus MC · Proteomics Center

PhD
Proteomics in biomedical research

About

348
Publications
48,510
Reads
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13,753
Citations
Introduction
- mass spectrometry based proteomics - quantitation in proteomics (SILAC, TMT, etc.) - targeted proteomics - protein complex and protein-protein interaction networks - characterization of posttranslational protein modifications - the ubiquitin-proteasome system - transcription and gene regulation in health and disease - chromatin biology
Additional affiliations
January 2008 - present
Erasmus MC
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2005 - present
Erasmus MC
July 2003 - December 2004
The Rockefeller University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (348)
Article
Vesicle-based medicines hold great promise for therapy development but essential knowledge on the bio-distribution and longevity of vesicles after administration is lacking. We generated vesicles from the membranes of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and we demonstrated earlier that these so-called membrane particles (MP) mediate immunomodulat...
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Full-text available
Background & Aims Antigen-specific immunotherapy is a promising strategy to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To facilitate killing of malignant and/or infected hepatocytes, it is vital to know which T cell targets are presented by HLA-I complexes on patient-derived hepatocytes. Here, we aimed to reveal the...
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Tissue-resident macrophages of the brain, including microglia, are implicated in the pathogenesis of various CNS disorders and are possible therapeutic targets by their chemical depletion or replenishment by hematopoietic stem cell therapy. Nevertheless, a comprehensive understanding of microglial function and the consequences of microglial depleti...
Article
Alix is a ubiquitously expressed scaffold protein that participates in numerous cellular processes related to the remodeling/repair of membranes and the actin cytoskeleton. Alix exists in monomeric and dimeric/multimeric configurations, but how dimer formation occurs and what role the dimer has in Alix-mediated processes are still largely elusive....
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We investigated for the first time the proteomic profiles both in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) patients. Cryostat sections of DLPFC and ACC of MDD and BD patients with their respective well-matched controls were used for study. Proteins we...
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Single-cell proteomics has the potential to decipher tumor heterogeneity, and a method like single-cell proteomics by mass spectrometry (SCoPE-MS) allows profiling several tens of single cells for >1,000 proteins per cell. This method, however, cannot link the proteome of individual cells with phenotypes of interest. Here, we developed a microscopy...
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Full-text available
A major pharmacological strategy toward HIV cure aims to reverse latency in infected cells as a first step leading to their elimination. While the unbiased identification of molecular targets physically associated with the latent HIV-1 provirus would be highly valuable to unravel the molecular determinants of HIV-1 transcriptional repression and la...
Article
Full-text available
Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a structural birth defect of the diaphragm, with lung hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Aside from vascular defects, the lungs show a disturbed balance of differentiated airway epithelial cells. The Sry related HMG box protein SOX2 is an important transcription factor for proper differentiation of...
Article
The removal of (poly)ubiquitin chains at the proteasome is a key step in the protein degradation pathway that determines which proteins are degraded and ultimately decides cell fate. Three different deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are associated to the human proteasome, PSMD14 (RPN11), USP14 and UCH37 (UCHL5). However, the functional roles and spec...
Article
Nucleotide excision repair (NER) counteracts the onset of cancer and aging by removing helix-distorting DNA lesions via a “cut-and-patch”-type reaction. The regulatory mechanisms that drive NER through its successive damage recognition, verification, incision, and gap restoration reaction steps remain elusive. Here, we show that the RAD5-related tr...
Article
Full-text available
SMPD4 is a neutral sphingomyelinase implicated in a specific type of congenital microcephaly. Although not intensively studied, SMPD4 deficiency has also been found to cause cell division defects. This suggests a role for SMPD4 in cell-cycle and differentiation. In order to explore this role, we used proximity ligation to identify the partners of S...
Article
Full-text available
Excitatory synapses of principal hippocampal neurons are frequently located on dendritic spines. The dynamic strengthening or weakening of individual inputs results in structural and molecular diversity of dendritic spines. Active spines with large calcium ion (Ca2+ ) transients are frequently invaded by a single protrusion from the endoplasmic ret...
Article
Full-text available
Tumour hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumours and contributes to tumour progression, metastasis development and therapy resistance. In response to hypoxia, tumour cells secrete pro-angiogenic factors to induce blood vessel formation and restore oxygen supply to hypoxic regions. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are emerging as mediators of intercellular...
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Full-text available
Extracellular vesicles (EV) derived from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a potential therapy for immunological and degenerative diseases. However, large-scale production of EV free from contamination by soluble proteins is a major challenge. The generation of particles from isolated membranes of MSC, membrane particles (MP), may be an alternati...
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Full-text available
The 10-subunit TFIIH complex is vital to transcription and nucleotide excision repair. Hereditary mutations in its smallest subunit, TTDA/GTF2H5, cause a photosensitive form of the rare developmental disorder trichothiodystrophy. Some trichothiodystrophy features are thought to be caused by subtle transcription or gene expression defects. TTDA/GTF2...
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The rapid, sensitive and specific detection of SARS-CoV-2 is critical in responding to the current COVID-19 outbreak. In this proof-of-concept study, we explored the potential of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 proteins in both research samples and clinical specimens. First, we assessed the limit of...
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Canonical non-homologous end-joining (cNHEJ) is the prominent mammalian DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair pathway operative throughout the cell cycle. Phosphorylation of Ku70 at ser27-ser33 (pKu70) is induced by DNA DSBs and has been shown to regulate cNHEJ activity, but the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here, we established that foll...
Preprint
Full-text available
Tumor heterogeneity is an important source of cancer therapy resistance. Single cell proteomics has the potential to decipher protein content leading to heterogeneous cellular phenotypes. Single-Cell ProtEomics by Mass Spectrometry (SCoPE-MS) is a recently developed, promising, unbiased proteomic profiling techniques, which allows profiling several...
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Full-text available
The bone microenvironment is one of the most hypoxic regions of the human body and in experimental models; hypoxia inhibits osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Our previous work revealed that Mucin 1 (MUC1) was dynamically expressed during osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs and upregulated by hypoxia. Upon stimulat...
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Full-text available
ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers control the accessibility of genomic DNA through nucleosome mobilization. However, the dynamics of genome exploration by remodelers, and the role of ATP hydrolysis in this process remain unclear. We used live-cell imaging of Drosophila polytene nuclei to monitor Brahma (BRM) remodeler interactions with its chromos...
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Full-text available
Background: Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG expansion in the huntingtin gene, resulting in a polyglutamine expansion in the ubiquitously expressed mutant huntingtin protein. Objective: Here we set out to identify proteins interacting with the full-length wild-type and mutant huntingtin protein in the mice cor...
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Full-text available
Correct transcription is crucial for life. However, DNA damage severely impedes elongating RNA polymerase II, causing transcription inhibition and transcription-replication conflicts. Cells are equipped with intricate mechanisms to counteract the severe consequence of these transcription-blocking lesions. However, the exact mechanism and factors in...
Article
Full-text available
RNA splicing, transcription and the DNA damage response are intriguingly linked in mammals but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using an in vivo biotinylation tagging approach in mice, we show that the splicing factor XAB2 interacts with the core spliceosome and that it binds to spliceosomal U4 and U6 snRNAs and pre-mRNAs in deve...
Article
Full-text available
Protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B) is critical for synaptic plasticity and learning, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here we identified different types of proteins that interact with PP2B, among which structural proteins of the postsynaptic densities (PSDs) of Purkinje cells (PCs) in mice of either se. Deleting PP2B reduced express...
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Full-text available
Immunopeptidomics is used to identify novel epitopes for (therapeutic) vaccination strategies in cancer and infectious disease. Various false discovery rates (FDRs) are applied in the field when converting liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) spectra to peptides. Subsequently, large efforts have recently been made to rescue pep...
Preprint
Correct transcription is crucial for life. However, DNA damage severely impedes elongating RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), causing transcription inhibition and transcription-replication conflicts. Cells are equipped with intricate mechanisms to counteract the severe consequence of these transcription-blocking lesions (TBLs). However, the exact mechanis...
Article
Full-text available
The stalled fork protection pathway mediated by breast cancer 1/2 (BRCA1/2) proteins is critical for replication fork stability. However, it is unclear whether additional mechanisms are required to maintain replication fork stability. We describe a hitherto unknown mechanism, by which the SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator...
Article
Full-text available
The N-Myc Downstream-Regulated Gene 4 (NDRG4), a prominent biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC), is specifically expressed by enteric neurons. Considering that nerves are important members of the tumor microenvironment, we here establish different Ndrg4 knockout (Ndrg4-/- ) CRC models and an indirect co-culture of primary enteric nervous system (E...
Preprint
ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers control the accessibility of genomic DNA through nucleosome mobilization. However, the dynamics of genome exploration by remodelers, and the role of ATP hydrolysis in this process remain unclear. We used live-cell imaging of Drosophila polytene nuclei to monitor Brahma (BRM) remodeler interactions with its chromos...
Preprint
Full-text available
A major pharmacological strategy toward HIV cure aims to reverse latency in infected cells as a first step leading to their elimination. While the unbiased identification of molecular targets physically associated with the latent HIV-1 provirus would be highly valuable to unravel the molecular determinants of HIV-1 transcriptional repression and la...
Article
Full-text available
Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by brain-specific loss of UBE3A, an E3 ubiquitin protein ligase. A substantial number of possible ubiquitination targets of UBE3A have been identified, although evidence of being direct UBE3A substrates is often lacking. Here we identified the synaptic protein Rabphilin-3a (RPH3A...
Preprint
Full-text available
Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by brain-specific loss of UBE3A, an E3 ubiquitin protein ligase. A substantial number of possible ubiquitination targets of UBE3A have been identified, although evidence of being direct UBE3A substrates is often lacking. Here we identified the synaptic protein Rabphilin-3a (RPH3A...
Article
Full-text available
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), may result in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multi-organ failure and death. The alveolar epithelium is a major target of the virus, but representative models to study virus host interactions in more detail are currently lacki...
Article
Dendritic cells (DCs) are key immune modulators and are able to mount immune responses or tolerance. DC differentiation and activation imply a plethora of molecular and cellular responses, including transcriptional changes. PU.1 is a highly expressed transcription factor in DCs and coordinates relevant aspects of DC biology. Due to their role as im...
Preprint
Full-text available
Excitatory synapses of principal hippocampal neurons are frequently located on dendritic spines. The dynamic strengthening or weakening of individual inputs results in a great structural and molecular diversity of dendritic spines. Active spines with large Ca2+ transients are frequently invaded by a single protrusion from the endoplasmic reticulum...
Preprint
Full-text available
RNA splicing, transcription and the DNA damage response are intriguingly linked in mammals but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using an in vivo biotinylation tagging approach in mice, we show that the splicing factor XAB2 interacts with the core spliceosome and that it binds to spliceosomal U4 and U6 snRNAs and pre-mRNAs in deve...
Preprint
Full-text available
RNA splicing, transcription and the DNA damage response are intriguingly linked in mammals but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using an in vivo biotinylation tagging approach in mice, we show that the splicing factor XAB2 interacts with the core spliceosome and that it binds to spliceosomal U4 and U6 snRNAs and pre-mRNAs in deve...
Article
Full-text available
CRISPR-Cas9 systems are enriched in human pathogenic bacteria and have been linked to cytotoxicity by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that upon infection of human cells, Campylobacter jejuni secretes its Cas9 (CjeCas9) nuclease into their cytoplasm. Next, a native nuclear localization signal enables CjeCas9 nuclear entry, where it catalyzes met...
Article
Full-text available
In vascular tissue engineering strategies, the addition of vascular-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components may better mimic the in vivo microenvironment and potentially enhance cell–matrix interactions and subsequent tissue growth. For this purpose, the exact composition of the human vascular ECM first needs to be fully characterized. Most...
Article
Full-text available
The oxygen-transport function of hemoglobin (HB) is thought to have arisen ~500 million years ago, roughly coinciding with the divergence between jawless (Agnatha) and jawed (Gnathostomata) vertebrates. Intriguingly, extant HBs of jawless and jawed vertebrates were shown to have evolved twice, and independently, from different ancestral globin prot...
Article
Chemotherapeutic regimens that poison DNA replication are used for the treatment of homologous recombination (HR)-deficient cancers. We have discovered a novel mechanism by which the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler SMARCAD1 stabilizes replication forks that is essential for resistance towards replication poisons. We find that loss of SMARCAD1 results i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The rapid, sensitive and specific diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 by fast and unambiguous testing is widely recognized to be critical in responding the current outbreak. Since the current testing capacity by conventional PCR based met...
Article
Many chromatin remodeling and modifying proteins are involved in the DNA damage response, where they stimulate repair or induce DNA damage signaling. Interestingly, we identified that downregulation of the histone H1 (H1)-interacting protein SET results in increased resistance to a wide variety of DNA damaging agents. We found that this increased r...
Article
Full-text available
The congenital form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (cDM) is caused by the large-scale expansion of a (CTG•CAG)n repeat in DMPK and DM1-AS. The production of toxic transcripts with long trinucleotide tracts from these genes results in impairment of the myogenic differentiation capacity as cDM’s most prominent morpho-phenotypic hallmark. In the current...
Article
Sphingomyelinases generate ceramide from sphingomyelin as a second messenger in intracellular signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis. Children from 12 unrelated families presented with microcephaly, simplified gyral pattern of the cortex, hypomyelination, cerebellar hypoplasia, congenital arthrogryposis, an...
Article
Full-text available
The spine apparatus (SA) is an endoplasmic reticulum-related organelle that is present in a subset of dendritic spines in cortical and pyramidal neurons, and plays an important role in Ca2+ homeostasis and dendritic spine plasticity. The protein synaptopodin is essential for the formation of the SA and is widely used as a maker for this organelle....
Article
Full-text available
Homologous recombination (HR) and Fanconi Anemia (FA) pathway proteins in addition to their DNA repair functions, limit nuclease-mediated processing of stalled replication forks. However, the mechanism by which replication fork degradation results in genome instability is poorly understood. Here, we identify RIF1, a non-homologous end joining (NHEJ...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Conference Paper
Introduction: ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers are frequently mutated in cancers. Similar to the better studied SWI/SNF remodelers, the sequencing of cancer genomes has uncovered frequent mutations in genes encoding the Nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) subunits. Upon closer inspection, NuRD complex is highly amplified in breas...
Article
Full-text available
Lysosomal exocytosis is a ubiquitous process negatively regulated by neuraminidase 1 (NEU1), a sialidase mutated in the glycoprotein storage disease sialidosis. In Neu1 −/− mice, excessive lysosomal exocytosis is at the basis of disease pathogenesis. Yet, the tissue-specific molecular consequences of this deregulated pathway are still unfolding. We...
Article
Full-text available
Cell-based approaches using tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to replace damaged renal tissue with 3D constructs is a promising emerging therapy for kidney disease. Besides living cells, a template provided by a scaffold based on biomaterials and bioactive factors is needed for successful kidney engineering. Nature's own template for a s...
Conference Paper
Introduction: ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers are frequently mutated in cancers. Similar to the better studied SWI/SNF remodelers, the sequencing of cancer genomes has uncovered frequent mutations in genes encoding the Nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) subunits. Upon closer inspection, NuRD complex is highly amplified in breas...
Article
Full-text available
The Mediator complex regulates transcription by connecting enhancers to promoters. High Mediator binding density defines super enhancers, which regulate cell-identity genes and oncogenes. Protein interactions of Mediator may explain its role in these processes but have not been identified comprehensively. Here, we purify Mediator from neural stem c...