Jeremy Tree

Jeremy Tree
Swansea University | SWAN · Department of Psychology

PhD, FBPsS, CPsychol

About

91
Publications
32,651
Reads
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1,299
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2008 - August 2020
Swansea University
Position
  • Professor (Full)
September 2001 - June 2008
University of Exeter
Position
  • Research Fellow/Senior Research Fellow

Publications

Publications (91)
Article
Full-text available
Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is characterised by a severe lifelong impairment in face recognition. In recent years it has become clear that DP affects a substantial number of people, yet little work has attempted to improve face processing in these individuals. Intriguingly, recent evidence suggests that intranasal inhalation of the hormone oxy...
Article
It has been reported that congenital prosopagnosics may have a general imagery deficit or an imagery deficit specific to faces. However, much of this evidence is based on self-report questionnaires, rather than experimentally based testing (Grüter et al., 2007, 2009). This study tested face and non-face based imagery in a case series of congenital...
Article
Full-text available
Woollams, Lambon Ralph, Plaut, and Patterson reported detailed data on reading in 51 cases of semantic dementia. They simulated some aspects of these data using a connectionist parallel distributed processing (PDP) triangle model of reading. We argue here that a different model of reading, the dual route cascaded (DRC) model of Coltheart, Rastle, P...
Article
Full-text available
COVID-19 presented a major societal challenge including threat to life, bereavement, self-isolation, loss of income and significant psychological distress. Yet, it is possible that such suffering may also lead to post-traumatic growth (PTG) and subsequent wellbeing. The current study aimed to investigate the contributors to PTG and whether PTG medi...
Article
Co-design involves engaging with the end-user in the design process and may help reduce the barriers to assistive technology use. Previous research has used co-design in the provision of assistive technology, but no research has looked at applying it within a healthcare setting. This service evaluation examines the use of co-design in providing cus...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Stylistic differences in language use, as described by sociolinguists, have also been shown to occur in disordered speech and language. In this article, we describe apraxia of speech, and compare stroke-induced and progressive forms of this neurogenic disorder. Method: Audio recordings were made of a client, CS, who had progressive apra...
Article
The Benton Facial Recognition Test (BFRT) is a paper-and-pen task that is traditionally used to assess face perception skills in neurological, clinical and psychiatric conditions. Despite criticisms of its stimuli, the task enjoys a simple procedure and is rapid to administer. Further, it has recently been computerised (BFRT-c), allowing reliable m...
Preprint
The Benton Facial Recognition Test (BFRT) is a paper-and-pen task that is traditionally used to assess face perception skills in neurological, clinical and psychiatric conditions. Despite criticisms of its stimuli, the task enjoys a simple procedure and is rapid to administer. Further, it has recently been computerised (BFRT-c), allowing reliable m...
Poster
Full-text available
Qu’il se soit passé la veille ou il y a plusieurs années, l’avènement d’une catastrophe est susceptible de s’inscrire durablement dans la mémoire d’un individu. Les catastrophes bouleversent personnes et territoires touchés et, pourtant, les souvenirs de ces événements marquants peuvent grandement varier en termes d’intensité et de longévité dans l...
Article
Individuals are better at recognizing faces from their own ethnic group compared with other ethnicity faces-the other-ethnicity effect (OEE). This finding is said to reflect differences in experience and familiarity to faces from other ethnicities relative to faces corresponding with the viewers' ethnicity. However, own-ethnicity face recognition p...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a global threat to physical and mental health worldwide. Research has highlighted adverse impacts of COVID-19 on wellbeing but has yet to offer insights as to how wellbeing may be protected. Inspired by developments in wellbeing science and guided by our own theoretical framework (the GENIAL model), we examined t...
Article
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Bilingualism has been identified as a potential cognitive factor linked to delayed onset of dementia as well as boosting executive functions in healthy individuals. However, more recently, this claim has been called into question following several failed replications. It remains unclear whether these contradictory findings reflect how bilingualism...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) is increasingly recognized in both the clinical and research arenas as a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. Although SCD is etiologically heterogeneous and potentially treatable, in comparison to MCI and Alzheimer's disease, SCD remains poorly characterized with its clinical...
Article
Full-text available
Differentiation of speech is predictable from abilities to discriminate the speed at which a sound reaches its optimum amplitude (rise time). This study investigated whether rise time identification of an affricate–fricative continuum would be impacted upon by dyslexia. Children between 10 and 14 years old identified sounds along a continuum of fri...
Preprint
Full-text available
Here we examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown on wellbeing among UK-based respondents (N = 133). We explore the extent to which variables across wellbeing domains (physical activity, gratitude, tragic optimism, social support, and nature connection) contribute to wellbeing according to our previously proposed GENIAL model. Wellbeing...
Article
When people recognize faces, they normally move their eyes so that their first fixation is in the optimal location for efficient perceptual processing. This location is found just below the centre-point between the eyes. This type of attentional bias could be partly innate, but also an inevitable developmental process that aids our ability to recog...
Article
Purpose Assistive technology can provide a key tool to enabling independence, greater inclusion and participation in society for individuals with chronic conditions. This potential is currently not always realized due to barriers to accessing and using assistive technology. This review aims to identify the common barriers to acquiring and using ass...
Article
Full-text available
Research indicates that Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) is associated with significant and chronic impairment across multiple areas of functioning including physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioral domains. Whilst impairments associated with ABI can be ameliorated, cure is seldom possible. The emergence of positive psychology reflects a paradigm s...
Article
Full-text available
Research indicates that Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) is associated with significant and chronic impairment across multiple areas of functioning including physical, cognitive, emotional and behavioural domains. Whilst impairments associated with ABI can be ameliorated, cure is seldom possible. The emergence of positive psychology reflects a paradigm...
Article
A prevailing debate in the psychological literature concerns the domain-specificity of the face recognition system, where evidence from typical and neurological participants has been interpreted as evidence that faces are "special". Although several studies have investigated the same question in cases of developmental prosopagnosia, the vast majori...
Article
Full-text available
Slowed behavioral reaction time is associated with pathological brain changes, including white matter lesions, the common clinical characteristic of subcortical ischemic vascular cognitive impairment (SIVCI). In the present study, reaction time (RT) employing Trails B of the Trail Making Test, with responses capped at 300 s, was investigated in SIV...
Article
Full-text available
In this study, reaction time (RT), intraindividual variability (IIV), and errors, and the effects of practice and processing load upon such function, were compared in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular cognitive impairment (SIVCI) [n = 27] and cognitively healthy older adults (CH) [n = 26]. Compared to CH aging, SIVCI was characterized by...
Preprint
Full-text available
1 The construct of wellbeing has been criticised as a neoliberal construction of western individualism that ignores 2 wider systemic issues including increasing burden of chronic disease, widening inequality, concerns over environ-3 mental degradation and anthropogenic climate change. While these criticisms overlook recent developments, there 4 rem...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Recent studies have revealed a high prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among university students, highlighting an urgent need for preventative measures at low cost to better support often overwhelmed support services. Objective: Here we propose a protocol for assessing the feasibility of a randomised controlled t...
Preprint
A series of experiments investigated the extent to which a developmentalprosopagnosic, A.A., was able to use configural and featural processing to recognise faces and objects (flowers). A.A. was presented with tasks in which either configural or featural processing was selectively disrupted, by scrambling or blurring. A.A.'s face- matching performa...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Reading in pure alexia is slow and inaccurate, and is characterised by word length effects. This is due to an inability to access visual word forms from print and compounded by poor performance in letter identification. Tactile-kinaesthetic facilitation is a technique used to access letter and word representations via an alternative rou...
Article
Full-text available
In the last 15 years, increasing numbers of individuals have self-referred to research laboratories in the belief that they experience severe everyday difficulties with face recognition. The condition "developmental prosopagnosia" (DP) is typically diagnosed when impairment is identified on at least two objective face-processing tests, usually invo...
Article
Full-text available
vestigations of neurodegenerative disorders may reveal functional relationships in the cognitive system. C.S. was a 63-year-old right-handed man with Pick's disease with a range of progressive impairments including nonfluent aphasia, limb, oculomotor, bucco-facial and speech apraxia but mostly intact intelligence, perception, orientation, memory, s...
Article
Full-text available
In this study we examined attention-related reaction time (RT) and intra-individual variability (IIV) in younger and older adults using an iPad-based visual search test, in which, for each trial, participants were required to sequentially press a series of on-screen stimuli numbered from 1 to 8. Although overall performance RT was significantly slo...
Article
Full-text available
Although subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) is increasingly recognized clinically and in research as a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment and dementia (particularly Alzheimer's disease), it is etiologically heterogeneous and potentially treatable. Compared to mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, SCI however remains poorly ch...
Article
Full-text available
In the field of cognitive neuropsychology of phonological short-term memory (pSTM), a key debate surrounds the issue of how impairment on tasks deemed to tap this system imply a dissociable phonological input and output buffer system, with the implication that impairments can be fractionated across disruption to separate functional components (Nick...
Article
It has recently been suggested that the other race effect (ORE), whereby own race faces are recognised better than those of other races, can be abolished by bilingualism. Bilingualism, however, is not a categorical variable but can vary dramatically in proficiency across the two languages. We therefore hypothesised that increasing bilingual profici...
Preprint
Full-text available
Geskin & Behrmann provide an extensive and scholarly meta-analysis of the extant cases of developmental prosopagnosia (DP) in order to ascertain how often impairments in face recognition and object recognition co-occur, mirroring an influential review of the acquired agnosias by Farah (1991) published in this journal. The authors conclude that for...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes longitudinal testing of two Semantic Dementia (SD) cases. It is common for patients with SD to present with deficits in reading aloud irregular words (i.e. surface dyslexia), and in lexical decision. Theorists from the connectionist tradition (e.g. Woollams, et al., 2007) argue that in SD cases with concurrent surface dyslexia,...
Article
Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is a condition in which individuals experience life-long problems recognising faces. In recent years, unpacking the nature of the impairments of this population has been the focus of numerous studies. One focus has been on the nature of face-based memory impairments for such individuals, with the onus being mainly o...
Article
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global social problem, which may result in intimate partner homicide (IPH). Much of the research concerned with IPH is based in developed nations and as such this study explored men’s explanations for IPH (known locally as “passion killing”) in the Namibian context by interviewing 10 individuals who were convict...
Article
Full-text available
A wealth of evidence from behavioural, neuropsychological and neuroimaging research supports the view that face recognition is reliant upon a domain-specific network that does not process words. In contrast, the recent many-to-many model of visual recognition posits that brain areas involved in word and face recognition are functionally integrated....
Article
Across 2 studies, the authors asked whether extensive experience in portrait art is associated with face recognition ability. In Study 1, 64 students completed a standardized face recognition test before and after completing a year-long art course that included substantial portraiture training. They found no evidence of an improvement in face recog...
Article
Full-text available
Western cultures promote a thin and curvaceous ideal body size that most women find difficult to achieve by healthy measures, resulting in poor body image and increased risk for eating pathology. Research focusing on body image in lesbian and bisexual women has yielded inconsistent results. In total, 11 lesbian and bisexual women were interviewed r...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last 20 years much attention in the field of face recognition has been directed towards the study of developmental prosopagnosia (DP), with some authors investigating the behavioural characteristics of the condition and many others using these individuals to further our theoretical understanding of the typical face-processing system. It is...
Article
This study examined the importance of prefixes as sublexical cues for stress assignment during reading aloud English disyllabic words. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that prefixes repel stress (Rastle & Coltheart, 2000) by investigating the likelihood with which patients with surface dyslexia assign second-syllable stress to prefixed words...
Article
Full-text available
The role of the semantic system in recognizing objects is a matter of debate. Connectionist theories argue that it is impossible for a participant to determine that an object is familiar to them without recourse to a semantic hub; localist theories state that accessing a stored representation of the visual features of the object is sufficient for r...
Article
Full-text available
It has long been suggested that face recognition relies on specialized mechanisms that are not involved in visual recognition of other object categories, including those that require expert, fine-grained discrimination at the exemplar level such as written words. But according to the recently proposed many-to-many theory of object recognition (MTMT...
Article
Full-text available
Extensive research on the concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as a potential prodromal stage of dementia has highlighted the likelihood that abnormalities in information processing occur at even earlier stages in the disease process with research increasingly focused on the relatively new concept of subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). An...
Article
Investigations of neurodegenerative disorders may reveal functional relationships in the cognitive system. C.S. was a 63-year-old right-handed man with post-mortem confirmed Pick's disease with a range of progressive impairments including non-fluent aphasia, speech, limb, oculomotor, and buccofacial apraxia, but mostly intact intelligence, percepti...
Article
Full-text available
The literature concerning reading in acquired phonological dyslexia is conflicted with regard to performance with pseudohomophones (e.g. SKOOL). While some cases are more accurate in pronouncing non-words that sound like known words than those that do not, other cases show no pseudohomophone advantage. Some cases are more successful when pseudohomo...
Article
Full-text available
We report the case of an individual with acquired prosopagnosia who experiences extreme difficulties in recognizing familiar faces in everyday life despite excellent object recognition skills. Formal testing indicates that he is also severely impaired at remembering pre-experimentally unfamiliar faces and that he takes an extremely long time to ide...
Poster
Poster presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, Washington D.C., USA.
Conference Paper
Approximately 800,000 people in the UK have Alzheimer’s disease (AD); approximately 5-20% of older people in the UK have mild cognitive impairment (MCI); and approximately one-quarter to one-half of older adults are believed to have subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). By 2050 the number of people living with AD in the UK will rise to 1.7 million...
Article
Humans have extensive experience with both faces and words, and it has recently been proposed that face and word recognition rely on common mechanisms. This view predicts that acquired prosopagnosics will show word recognition deficits, though possibly to a lesser extent (Behrmann & Plaut, 2013 TICS). While normal word recognition in prosopagnosia...
Article
Full-text available
Dual process models of recognition memory propose two distinct routes for recognizing a face: recollection and familiarity. Recollection is characterized by the remembering of some contextual detail from a previous encounter with a face whereas familiarity is the feeling of finding a face familiar without any contextual details. The Remember/Know (...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Within dual-route models of reading, words with regular spelling to sound correspondences can be read successfully using lexical or nonlexical reading processes. Research has indicated that which of these pathways is used is influenced by the other items that form the presentation context.Aims: We extend these findings using acronym sti...
Conference Paper
Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is a face perception disorder characterised by an impairment for recognising faces combined with normal intelligence and intact low level visual processing (Bodamer, 1947). While a deficit for recognising faces in DP is well established, the exact nature of this impairment still remains unclear. Dual-process theorie...
Article
In the field of dementia research, there are reports of neurodegenerative cases with a focal loss of language, termed primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Currently, this condition has been further sub-classified, with the most recent sub-type dubbed logopenic variant (PPA-LV). As yet, there remains somewhat limited evaluation of the characteristics...
Article
Recent research into nonfluent forms of primary progressive aphasia and progressive apraxia of speech has highlighted the importance of speech rate as a diagnostic feature. We describe detailed investigation and comparison of speech rate (latencies and utterance length in single word/nonword production and speech rate in connected speech) on a rang...
Conference Paper
Developmental prosopagnosia (DP) is a face perception disorder characterised by an impairment for recognising faces combined with normal intelligence and intact low level visual processing. While a deficit for recognising faces in DP is well established, the exact nature of this impairment still remains unclear. Dual-process theories of recognition...
Article
Full-text available
We describe an analysis of speech errors on a confrontation naming task in a man with progressive speech degeneration of 10-year duration from Pick's disease. C.S. had a progressive non-fluent aphasia together with a motor speech impairment and early assessment indicated some naming impairments. There was also an absence of significant phonological...
Article
Full-text available
In a now-classic study Besner and Davelaar (1982) reported an advantage of pseudohomophone (PSH) over nonword recall in a visual immediate serial recall (ISR) task, which remained under articulatory suppression (AS), and interpreted the findings as indicating PSH items obtain support from stored phonological long-term memory (LTM) representations e...
Article
The role of phonological short-term memory (pSTM) in phonological judgement tasks of print has been widely explored using concurrent articulation (CA). A number of studies have examined the effects of CA on written word/nonword rhyme and homophone judgements but the findings have been mixed and few studies have examined both tasks within subjects....
Article
Full-text available
Rogers, Lambon Ralph, Hodges, and Patterson (2004)29. Rogers , T. T. , Lambon Ralph , M. A. , Hodges , J. R. and Patterson , K. 2004. Natural selection: The impact of semantic impairment on lexical and object decision. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 21: 331–352. [Taylor & Francis Online], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®]View all references studied two-...
Article
The current authors reply to a response by Woollams, Lambon Ralph, Plaut, and Patterson on a comment by the current authors on the original article. The current authors list their agreements and disagreements with Woollams, Lambon Ralph, Plaut, and Patterson's response on the topics of the human reading system, cognitive architecture, experimental...
Article
Full-text available
We describe the investigation of speech automatisms in a man with progressive nonfluent aphasia and apraxias. Occurrence of the automatisms yes and right, were analysed across a range of speech tasks varying in length, propositionality, lexical and articulatory complexity, whether tasks engaged internal generation or external triggering and articul...
Article
In this paper we report findings from a systematic investigation of spelling performance in three patients - PR, RH and AC - who despite their different medical diagnoses showed a very consistent pattern of dysgraphia, more typical of graphemic buffer disorder. Systematic investigation of the features characteristic of this disorder in Study 1 conf...