Jeremy Tambling

Jeremy Tambling

B.A (York), M.Phil (Nottingham), Ph.D (Essex)

About

128
Publications
7,679
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,685
Citations

Publications

Publications (128)
Article
The article compares the ways of looking in Dickens’ novels and in Cézanne’s art, drawing on the work of Merleau-Ponty for commentary on Cézanne, and on the commentaries on Merleau-Ponty by Lacan. It investigates the way in which Dickens, not often considered as having a visual interest, is modern in modes of perception, and tries to illuminate Mer...
Article
This paper explores how Judaism is represented in non-Jewish writers of the nineteenth-century (outstandingly, Walter Scott and George Eliot) and in modernist long novels, such as those by Dorothy Richardson, Marcel Proust, James Joyce, Alfred Doblin, Robert Musil, and Thomas Mann, and, in the Latin American novel, Carlos Fuentes and Roberto Bolano...
Article
In this article I discuss Hoffmann's novel Die Elixiere des Teufels in terms of Freud's essay ‘The Uncanny’ (‘Das Unheimliche’), especially with regard to the figure of the double, and also in relation to Freud's insistence, articulated at the same time as this essay, on the death drive and its relation to repetition. The difficulties in working ou...
Article
Full-text available
Article
This article studies the impact of Chaucer on Dickens, going through the Romantic appropriations of Chaucer (Wordsworth, Blake, Thomas Stothard, Hazlitt, Landor and Leigh Hunt). Working with a range of Dickens texts, but concentrating on Our Mutual Friend, it attempts to assess the relevance of Chaucer for Dickens's writing, drawing on Chaucer's Ge...
Article
Thomas Mann's novel Doktor Faustus reviews the history of German opera and its connections with the demonic, tracing through a process of thought which suggests the failure of humanistic art to renew itself or to be good for anything more than parody, and further suggesting that we have arrived, post-Auschwitz, at the end of art. It reads operatic...
Article
The relationship of Dickens to Ben Jonsons comedies has not been discussed as much as his relationship to Shakespeare, and this article makes a case for suggesting that it is as important. Dickenss interest in the character of Bobadill, which he acted, and his knowledge of The Alchemist, which he had thoughts of staging, and his interest in the phe...
Article
When Opera Meets Film is Marcia Citron’s second monograph on the subject of opera and film, following her Opera on Screen (New Haven, 2000). This book inverts the subject matter of the earlier one. Whereas the first volume dealt with versions of opera on film, Otello, Tales of Hoffmann, Parsifal, Carmen, and Don Giovanni in particular, with an adde...
Article
This paper looks at Lacan's stress on literature, the letter, and the individual letter, as constituting the unconscious and persisting in making its effects felt throughout speech and language. By taking selected examples from Pickwick Papers, David Copperfield and Bleak House, the unsettling and enduring effects of the letter are shown, as both q...
Article
A Companion to Charles Dickens contains five sections and thirty-six chapters, each by a different author, some reprising material previously published at greater length. These sections cover Charles Dickens's life; literary and cultural contexts; "English History Contexts" (with a nice essay on "Dickens and America (1842)" by Nancy Aycock Metz smu...
Article
Jennifer Jackson has written an intelligent, informative, and well-researched and welcome book, one aware of literary and critical theory, and of both music and literature. Developed from a Ph.D. thesis, it discusses the literary and operatic transformations of Don Carlos—as these originated in the events surrounding Philip II of Spain (1527-98), t...
Article
This article looks at Ruskin's essay 'Traffic' to examine his attitudes to art, beauty, and taste, and also to industrialism and contemporary architecture in England, especially in Bradford. Making comparison with both Baudelaire in 'The Painter of Modern Life', and Nietzsche on art in The Birth of Tragedy, the article looks at how Ruskin contrasts...
Article
The article gives a reading of Ruskin's autobiography, Praeterita, situating it in relation to the title and interests of Fors Clavigera. It examines Ruskin's self-accusations and confessions of ‘folly’ within the context of his encroaching madness: an effort is made to relate this madness to that of Nietzsche, while the phrase, ‘late style’ in the...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the Western paintings and ruins in Macao. It begins by showing how the European colonisation used the A-Ma Temple. Visitors can find a number of paintings by Western artists, such as the London-born and trained George Chinnery, who painted scenes from four different colonial stanzes. It then moves to a discussion of other Wes...
Chapter
This chapter discusses the defences and colonial architecture that were built in Macao. It is composed of walls that run from one end of Macao to the other; for example, the walls to the north run down to the Inner Harbour as a defence against the north. Aside from the walls that frame the city, there were fourteen fortresses that were built in the...
Article
This article offers a new reading and interpretation of the anonymous classic Chinese novel (published 1618), Jin Ping Mei {The Plum in the Golden Vase, sometimes called The Golden Lotus). The novel is a study of the fortunes of a household which is brought down by the promiscuous sexuality of its members, and the article first summarises the plot,...
Article
This reading of Ruskin's ‘Letters to the Workmen and Labourers of Great Britain’ (1871–84) discusses what it might mean to think of these letters as ‘posthumous’—one description that Ruskin used of his work—and examines what in them resists that sense that they are free from the founding authority of the father, and so are controlled by chance (for...
Article
Carlyle's "Sartor Resartus" is given a new reading here in the light of Nietzsche's brief but suggestive comments on Carlyle and his dyspepsia. It is seen as a text fascinated by devouring and the fear of being devoured (as with "The French Revolution"). Carlyle's Romantic investment in standing up as a man is read in the light of this fear of obli...
Article
The article explores three versions of Offenbach's opera: the Powell/Pressburger film, the video of John Schlesinger's production for Covent Garden, and the production at the Opera de Lyon. It reads all three in the light of the questions they pose regarding the voice and its fantasmatic appeal, the fantasy of the body in pieces, the uncanny imposs...
Article
This paper gives a close reading of Hawthorne's story “Rappaccini's Daughter” and James's novella The Aspern Papers to discuss three things: allegory as a European art form now seen in an American context; ambiguity in literature, which contests realism and is investigated through the writings of Georges Bataille and Jacques Derrida; and questionin...
Article
In the 'Toreador' song, Escamillo reminds himself that an 'oeil noir' is looking down on the Toreador while he battles: the eye—human's or bull's—makes him subject to the Lacanian gaze, and is a key for thinking of Rosi's film of Carmen (1984). This inherently technologizes looking, itself so much a thematic feature of Bizet's opera, implicit in al...
Chapter
‘Madness’, as the possession or loss of identity, is a crisis fascinating Blake’s ‘night thoughts’. What enables distinguishing and naming discrete forms and identities? — as in The Marriage of Heaven and Hell (1790)? This is cited by Bataille in Literature and Evil, associating it with the French Revolution, in his argument of Blake’s need to ‘loo...
Chapter
Blake’s art celebrates dawn, the theme of the picture ‘Albion Rose’ or ‘Glad Day’, which is inscribed: ‘Albion rose from where he labourd at the Mill with Slaves/Giving himself for the Nations he danc’d the dance of Eternal Death’ (E. 671, K. 160). The lyric ‘And did those feet’ from the Preface to Milton anticipates day, its ‘dark Satanic mills’ (...
Article
Tales of Several Cities After Dickens: American Notes for General Circulation City Spaces: Martin Chuzzlewit Writing in Reaction: Dickens, Thackeray, Trollope James, Trauma, and America The American Scene - I: Building American Houses The American Scene - II: James and New York The American Scene - III: The Past and Future of American Cities The St...
Article
The article gives a close reading of Purgatorio 18.76–145, 19.1–72, the cornice of sloth, and discusses the meanings of medieval acedia as the central one of the seven deadly sins. It sees the text as being possessed by a crisis: although Dante can look objectively at slothful souls, yet in his dream of the Siren, he is also likely to fall into the...
Article
This paper reads Dante's "Inferno" XII as a study of how Dante conceptualizes violence towards others. It concentrates on the Minotaur, the centaurs, and the violent bathed in blood, and discusses how the violent to others are characteristically seen as tyrants. It examines the implications of tyranny in Dante, and gives this some political and his...
Article
The essay looks at Dickens's versions of madness from the interpolated tales in Pickwick Papers onwards; drawing in characters in Barnaby Rudge, Mr Dick in David Copperfield and Miss Flite in Bleak House. It makes the point that the sane in Dickens are often portrayed as less so than the mad; that madness can hardly have a separate existence in Dic...
Article
Acknowledgements. Note on References. Introduction. 1. Form, Interpretation and the Open Work. 2. A Critical View of Culture: Mass Communications, Politics and the Avant--garde. 3. Introducing the Study of Signs. 4. A Study of Semiotics. 5. Semiotics Bounded and Unbound. 6. Theory and Fiction. 7. Secrets, Paranoia and Critical Reading. 8. Kant, the...
Article
Acknowledgements. Abbreviations. Apologia. 1. Phenomenology. 2. Structuralism. 3. Language: Speech and Writing. 4. Deconstructing the Text: Literature and Philosophy. 5. Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis. 6. The Ethics and Politics of Deconstruction and the Deconstruction of Ethics and Politics. Notes. Bibliography. Index.
Article
The Henry James Review 21.2 (2000) 189-190 The first thing that must be said of this book, the sixth of Adeline Tintner's surveys of everything that went into a James text and everything that has come out of them, is that it is bound somewhere to contain the essential piece of information that a James scholar is looking for, so that, used encyclope...
Article
In The Reign of Ideology Goodheart presents a powerful, tenacious critique of the prevailing fixation on ideology in literary theory. Exposing the debilitating effects of much "ideology critique" -which seeks to reveal the effects of power, privilege, and interest underlying critical approaches to works of art- whether practiced by feminists, neo-M...
Article
The Henry James Review 20.1 (1999) 43-50 On April 13, 1833, Emerson in Rome wrote in his journal: "Rome fashions my dreams. All night I wander amidst statues and fountains, and last night was introduced to Lord Byron!" (159). He proves the point Byron makes in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage: "Rome is as the desert, where we steer / Stumbling over recol...
Article
This collection of nine essays focuses on those writings of Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) on literature and language that have a direct relevance to contemporary literary theory, notably his analyses of myth, violence, history, criticism, literature, and mass media. ---------- David S. Ferris is Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at QueenÃ...
Article
Acknowledgements - A Note on References - Introduction: Dickens and the Dream of Scaffolds - Prison Bound: Dickens, Foucault and Great Expectations - 'An Impersonation of the Wintry Eighteen-Hundred and Forty-Six': Dombey and Son - 'A Paralysed Dumb Witness': Allegory in Bleak House - The Password in Little Dorrit - Dickens and Dostoyevsky: Capital...
Article
Full-text available
Roland Barthes discusses a postmodern condition in his last book, Camera Lucida: everything is signified and visible, and everything has the flatness of the photographic image; even death is rendered platitudinous, flat. If everything can be represented, nothing can be represented that would distinguish it from the mass of images already available;...
Article
New Literary History 28.2 (1997) 401-420 If to read a medieval text means beginning with its alterity, as Jauss and Paul Zumthor urge, alterity is not something determinate, nor single: distinctions in writing medieval texts may suggest not "the question of the alterity of the Middle Ages" but "the alterities within it." We read as "moderns," and c...