Jeremy J. Piggott

Jeremy J. Piggott
Trinity College Dublin | TCD · Department of Zoology

PhD

About

74
Publications
30,645
Reads
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3,094
Citations
Citations since 2017
47 Research Items
2580 Citations
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Introduction
My research focuses on several topical themes in fundamental and applied ecology, including the determinants of biodiversity structure and function from genes to ecosystems, the combined influence of multiple anthropogenic stressors on communities and ecosystems, and the management and conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the face of global change.
Additional affiliations
March 2016 - present
Kyoto University
Position
  • JSPS Invited Fellow
Description
  • Japan Society for the Promotion of Science long-term Invitation Fellowship
August 2015 - present
Imperial College London
Position
  • Trimble Visiting Fellow
June 2015 - present
Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES)
Position
  • Lead Author (Regional assessment of biodiversity and ecosystem services for Asia and the Pacific)

Publications

Publications (74)
Article
Note: In March 2016 this paper won the International Society of Limnology (SIL) inaugural “best paper” award for students or early career scientists. It was selected by 9 international judges as the best of the papers entered from 19 countries. Lack of knowledge about how the various drivers of global climate change will interact with multiple str...
Article
Full-text available
The potential for complex synergistic or antagonistic interactions between multiple stressors presents one of the largest uncertainties when predicting ecological change but, despite common use of the terms in the scientific literature, a consensus on their operational definition is still lacking. The identification of synergism or antagonism is ge...
Article
Global climate change is likely to modify the ecological consequences of currently acting stressors, but potentially important interactions between climate warming and land-use related stressors remain largely unknown. Agriculture affects streams and rivers worldwide, including via nutrient enrichment and increased fine sediment input. We manipulat...
Article
Full-text available
1.Measures of organic matter processing have been proposed as indices of stream ecosystem function to complement structural measures (water quality, taxonomic composition) in stream health monitoring. However, to be meaningful for ecosystem management, functional responses must be informed by knowledge of multiple stressors in the face of global ch...
Article
Large grazers can regulate biodiversity and ecosystem functioning through both direct and indirect effects on biological communities. For this reason, grazing by domestic livestock is frequently implemented as a conservation tool in many parts of the world and remains most popular in northwest Europe. Saltmarsh invertebrates support multiple ecosys...
Article
Full-text available
Climate warming is a ubiquitous stressor in freshwater ecosystems, yet its interactive effects with other stressors are poorly understood. We address this knowledge gap by testing the ability of three contrasting null models to predict the joint impacts of warming and a range of other aquatic stressors using a new database of 296 experimental combi...
Article
Rivers are a key part of the hydrological cycle and a vital conduit of water resources, but are under increasing threat from anthropogenic pressures. Linking pressures with ecosystem services is challenging because the processes interconnecting the physico-chemical, biological and socio-economic elements are usually captured using heterogenous meth...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding the ecological impacts of global change forces us to consider the antagonistic and synergistic interactions between the multiple stressors that ecosystems may face. At the community level, such interactions are quantified based on the responses of various ecosystem-functioning or diversity metrics. Worryingly, in empirical data, we fi...
Poster
Full-text available
Many studies in different ecosystems have shown that stressors co-occur and interact with each other to influence organisms. In river networks, local stressors change the quantity and quality of the material that subsidizes downstream sections. However, most of the multiple stressor research has focused on the effects of stressors at the place of t...
Article
Full-text available
See related 3-min video: https://vimeo.com/243219546 . Sustainable management of freshwater and pesticide use is essential for mitigating impacts of intensive agriculture in the context of a changing climate. To better understand how climate change will affect the vulnerability of freshwater ecosystems to chemical pollutants, more empirical evidenc...
Article
Full-text available
Warm discharges from industrial processes have the potential to impact benthic invertebrate communities and undermine river functioning as well as inform climate change impacts. We evaluated the effects of heated cooling waters from 2 power plants across 2 River Shannon locations (Ireland) in summer and in winter. The overall multivariate community...
Article
Full-text available
1. Uncertainty is an irreducible part of predictive science, causing us to over‐ or underestimate the magnitude of change that a system of interest will face. In a reductionist approach, we may use predictions at the level of individual system components (e.g. species biomass), and combine them to generate predictions for system‐level properties (e...
Article
Full-text available
Global change encompasses many co‐occurring anthropogenic stressors. Understanding the interactions between these multiple stressors, whether they be additive, antagonistic or synergistic, is critical for ecosystem managers when prioritising which stressors to mitigate in the face of global change. While such interactions between stressors appear p...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwaters are particularly vulnerable to pesticide contamination from adjacent agriculture and forestry. Cypermethrin is a commonly used pyrethroid insecticide, but information on its toxicity to non-target freshwater invertebrates is limited to a small number of taxa. We assessed cypermethrin toxicity to nymphs of the common European mayflies Ba...
Article
Contamination of the environment with toxic chemicals such as pesticides has become a global problem. Understanding the role of chemical contaminants as stressors in ecological systems is therefore an important research need in the 21st century. In surface freshwaters, mixtures of neonicotinoid insecticides are being detected around the world as mo...
Article
Full-text available
Bioindication has become an indispensable part of water quality monitoring in most countries of the world, with the presence and abundance of bioindicator taxa, mostly multicellular eukaryotes, used for biotic indices. In contrast, microbes (bacteria, archaea and protists) are seldom used as bioindicators in routine assessments, although they have...
Article
The global intensification of agriculture has resulted in pesticides playing an increasingly important role as anthropogenic stressors and drivers of environmental change. There is also a growing need to determine if other environmental stressors, especially those predicted to worsen with climate change, interact with pesticides to alter their effe...
Article
Despite advances in conceptual understanding, single-stressor abatement approaches remain common in the management of fresh waters, even though they can produce unexpected ecological responses when multiple stressors interact. Here we identify limitations restricting the development of multiple-stressor management strategies and address these, brid...
Article
Full-text available
Ensuring the provision of essential ecosystem services in systems affected by multiple stressors is a key challenge for theoretical and applied ecology. Trait-based approaches have increasingly been used in multiple-stressor research in freshwaters because they potentially provide a powerful method to explore the mechanisms underlying changes in po...
Article
Full-text available
Freshwater ecosystems face many simultaneous pressures due to human activities. Consequently, there has been a rapid loss of freshwater biodiversity and an increase in biomonitoring programs. Our study assessed the potential of benthic stream bacterial communities as indicators of multiple-stressor impacts associated with urbanisation and agricultu...
Poster
Full-text available
The poster demonstrates how to combine Bow-Ties and BBN methodology to inform environmental decision-making in coastal areas. The poster is part of the the international research project Land2Sea, where the focus is how to do integrated modelling of the consequences of terrestrial activities and climate change for aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem...
Preprint
Full-text available
A bstract Uncertainty is an irreducible part of predictive science, causing us to over- or underestimate the magnitude of change that a system of interest will face. In a reductionist approach, we may use predictions at the level of individual system components (e.g. species biomass), and combine them to generate predictions for system-level proper...
Article
Despite the progress made in environmental microbiology techniques and knowledge, the succession and functional changes of the microbial community under multiple stressors are still poorly understood. This is a substantial knowledge gap as microbial communities regulate the biogeochemistry of stream ecosystems. Our study assessed the structural and...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic environmental changes, or 'stressors', increasingly threaten biodiversity and ecosystem functioning worldwide. Multiple-stressor research is a rapidly expanding field of science that seeks to understand and ultimately predict the interactions between stressors. Reviews and meta-analyses of the primary scientific literature have largel...
Article
Anyone clicking on this link before April 03, 2020 will be taken directly to the final version of this article on ScienceDirect, which they are welcome to read or download: https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1aZddB8cco9YD ABSTRACT: Agricultural development has resulted in the degradation of freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Two key stressors impacting s...
Article
Freshwaters worldwide are affected by multiple stressors. Timing of inputs and pathways of delivery can influence the impact stressors have on freshwater communities. In particular, effects of point versus diffuse nutrient inputs on stream macroinvertebrates are poorly understood. Point-source inputs tend to pose a chronic problem, whereas diffuse...
Article
Full-text available
Neonicotinoid insecticides have been shown to have high chronic relative to acute toxicity, therefore short‐term toxicity tests of ≤ 96 hours in duration may underestimate their environmental risks. Among non‐target aquatic invertebrates, insects of the orders Diptera and Ephemeroptera have been found to be the most sensitive to neonicotinoids. To...
Article
Agricultural practices often result in multiple stressors affecting stream ecosystems, and interacting stressors complicate environmental assessment and management of impacted streams. The nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) is used for nitrogen management on farmland. Effects of leached DCD on stream ecosys- tems are still largely unstudie...
Article
Full-text available
This paper outlines the research being undertaken by the recently-initiated four-year (to March 2022) project on the small stream network in Ireland (SSNet) funded by the Irish Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The overarching objective of SSNet is to advance knowledge on the role of small streams in water quality, biodiversity and ecosystem s...
Article
Tropical streams are one of the most endangered ecosystems in the world due to the constant pressures from human activities. Among these activities, agriculture represents a land use that is crucial for human development but also a key driver of stream degradation and biodiversity decline in the tropics. Against this background, we investigated ind...
Chapter
In this chapter, we summarize the available information on the main stressors affecting running water ecosystems in Australia and New Zealand (NZ). Four major habitat types (MHT), or biomes, are found within this region of the Southern Hemisphere (Fig. 13.1). The four biomes comprise 11 freshwater ecoregions, which were judged to represent distinct...
Article
Full-text available
Current biomonitoring approaches are widely used but have some limitations. • DNA metabarcoding provides a new complementary tool for biomonitoring. • Metabarcoding allows extending the range of taxa used as bioindicators. • Metabarcoding data could be used to establish molecular metrics and indices. • Future work should standardise procedures and...
Article
Freshwater biodiversity provides important ecosystem services and is at the core of water quality monitoring worldwide. To assess freshwater biodiversity, genetic methods such as metabarcoding are increasingly used as they are faster and allow better taxonomic resolution than manual identification methods. Either sampled organisms are used directly...
Article
Full-text available
Traditionally, taxonomic characterisation of organisms has relied on their morphology; however, molecular methods are increasingly used to monitor and assess biodiversity and ecosystem health. Approaches such as DNA amplicon diversity assessments are a particularly useful tool when morphology-based taxonomy is difficult or taxa are morphologically...
Article
Multiple stressors affect stream ecosystems worldwide and their interactions are of particular concern, with gaps existing in understanding stressor impacts on stream communities. Addressing these knowledge gaps will aid in targeting and designing of appropriate mitigation measures. In this study, the agricultural stressors fine sediment (ambient,...
Article
Full-text available
Global environmental change is driven by multiple anthropogenic stressors. Conservation and restoration requires understanding the individual and joint action of these stressors to evaluate and prioritize management measures. To date, most studies on multiple stressor effects have sought to identify potential stressor interactions, defined as devia...
Article
Stream ecosystems are impacted by multiple stressors worldwide. Recent studies have shown that the effects of multiple stressors are often complex and difficult to predict based on the effects of single stressors. More research is needed to understand stressor impacts on stream communities and to design appropriate counteractions. We carried out an...
Presentation
Full-text available
The Stream Ecology Research Group at Otago University has won the ”River Story Award” at the 2017 New Zealand River Awards. A 3.5 min video made by the Cawthron Foundation tells a story about the multiple-stressor research done since 2007 in the ExStream System, an innovative research facility delevoped by Jay Piggott and Christoph Matthaei. The vi...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance of small tropical streams for maintaining freshwater biodiversity and providing essential ecosystem services to humans, relatively few studies have investigated multiple-stressor effects of climate and land-use change on these ecosystems, and how these effects may interact. To illustrate these knowledge gaps, we reviewed the...
Article
Full-text available
Disentangling the individual and interactive effects of multiple stressors on microbial communities is a key challenge to our understanding and management of ecosystems. Advances in molecular techniques allow studying microbial communities in situ and with high taxonomic resolution. However, the taxonomic level which provides the best trade-off bet...
Article
Full-text available
The protection, preservation and restoration of aquatic ecosystems and their functions are of global importance. For European states it became legally binding mainly through the EU-Water Framework Directive (WFD). In order to assess the ecological status of a given water body, aquatic biodiversity data are obtained and compared to a reference water...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the effects of environmental change on natural ecosystems is a major challenge, particularly when multiple stressors interact to produce unexpected “ecological surprises” in the form of complex, nonadditive effects that can amplify or reduce their individual effects. Animals often respond behaviorally to environmental change, and mult...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Note: A manuscript based on this conference presentation is currently in revision in Scientific Reports. Recent advances in molecular techniques allow studying entire microbial communities in their environment, with a resolution down to Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). Should we therefore investigate OTUs, or can we simply look at common phyla?...
Presentation
Full-text available
Despite the importance of small tropical streams for maintaining freshwater biodiversity and providing essential ecosystem services to humans, relatively few studies have investigated multiple-stressor effects of climate and land-use change on these ecosystems, and how these effects may interact. To illustrate these knowledge gaps, we reviewed the...
Article
Land-use changes have degraded ecosystems worldwide. A particular concern for freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem function are stressors introduced by intensified agriculture. Typically several stressors affect freshwater ecosystems simultaneously. However, the combined effects of these multiple stressors on streams and rivers are still poorly un...
Article
Full-text available
This brief project report summarizes the work program of the IPBES Asia-Pacific Regional Assessment and my contributions as a Lead Author towards producing and reviewing the Zero Order Draft as a visiting fellow at
Article
Pesticides and deposited fine sediment have been associated independently with changes in relative abundance and number of sensitive species in aquatic ecosystems, but the interplay between these stressors in agricultural streams is poorly un- derstood. We used a 28-d experiment in outdoor streamside mesocosms to examine the effects of varying leve...
Chapter
Biological monitoring has a long history in freshwaters, where much of the pioneering work in this field was developed over a 100 years ago-but few of the traditional monitoring tools provide the global perspective on biodiversity loss and its consequences for ecosystem functioning that are now needed. Rather than forcing existing monitoring paradi...
Data
Full-text available
Figure S1. Percentages of interaction classes by interaction type summarizing 170 studies manipulating two or more stressors in marine and coastal systems; reclassified from Crain et al. (8).
Data
Table S1. Comprehensive listing of studies used for analysis of cumulative effects of stressor pairs.
Data
Full-text available
Data S1. Descriptions of the response patterns of benthic invertebrate common taxa. BENTHIC INVERTEBRATE COMMON TAXA Focusing on the abundances of the 13 commonest taxa, Chironomidae (excluding Tanypodinae) increased with nutrient enrichment or sediment addition individually but the combined effect was similar to the individual effect of either str...
Data
Full-text available
Data S1. Descriptions of the response patterns of common algal taxa. Figure S1. Photo of circular stream mesocosms on Day 10 of the manipulative period by nutrient and sediment treatments. Figure S2. Absolute water temperatures during the manipulative period (days 0–21; recorded in header tanks at 5 min intervals). Figures S3–S5. Cell density patte...
Thesis
Full-text available
In streams and rivers draining agricultural catchments, deposited fine sediment and elevated nutrient concentrations represent two key land-use related stressors commonly associated with degraded ecological conditions that can interact in complex ways to affect ecosystem structure and function. How warming induced via changes in riparian vegetation...
Article
Full-text available
Changes to land use affect streams through nutrient enrichment, increased inputs of sediment and, where riparian vegetation has been removed, raised water temperature. We manipulated all three stressors in experimental streamside channels for 30 days and determined the individual and pair-wise combined effects on benthic invertebrate and algal comm...
Article
1. Benthic algal communities are shaped by the availability of nutrients and light and by herbivore consumption. Many studies have examined how one of these factors affects algal communities, but studies simultaneously addressing all three are rare. 2. We investigated the effects of nutrients, light and a herbivore (the snail Potamopyrgus antipodar...
Article
1. Many ecosystems are influenced simultaneously by multiple stressors, and the consequences of stressors are often unpredictable on the basis of knowledge of single effects. Agriculture affects streams world-wide via nutrient enrichment, elevated fine sediment and water abstraction for irrigation, but the combined impacts of these stressors are un...
Article
1. Productivity and grazing pressure interact in determining autotroph diversity, because high productivity increases the capability of a plant community to compensate for grazing losses. However, further factors may play a role in shaping diversity, including primary producer nutrient stoichiometry and grazer activity. 2. Our study focuses on the...
Article
Full-text available
The altitudinal zonation patterns of vegetation structure, vascular flora, and life/growth forms were comprehensively assessed in relation to temperature and soil factors from treeline (1040 m) to the high‐alpine summit of Mt Burns (1645 m) in southeastern Fiord Ecological Region. We tested Körner's hypothesis which stipulates that the physiognomic...
Article
Full-text available
The altitudinal zonation patterns of vegetation structure, vascular flora, and life/growth forms were comprehensively assessed in relation to temperature and soil factors from treeline (1040 m) to the high-alpine summit of Mt Burns (1645 m) in southeastern Fiord Ecological Region. We tested Körner's hypothesis which stipulates that the physiognomic...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Elucidate the effects of neonicotinoids on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in a multiple-stressor context. Do agricultural and environmental stressors interact with exposure to neonicotinoids to alter their toxicity to freshwater invertebrate communities?
Archived project
+ To understand the effects of multiple stressors on surface waters and groundwaters, their biota, and the services they provide to humans. + To understand how ecological status and ecosystem services are related – if at all. + To advise river basin management how to restore multiply stressed rivers and lakes. + To advise the revision of the Water Framework Directive on new indicators for ecological status and ecosystem services. + To develop methods and software for the Programmes of Measures.