Jeremy Catalin Andersen

Jeremy Catalin Andersen
University of Massachusetts Amherst | UMass Amherst · Department of Environmental Conservation

Doctor of Philosophy

About

63
Publications
10,443
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344
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2016 - present
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Landscape genetics of invasive yellow starthistle populations in California
August 2009 - May 2015
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (63)
Article
Islands make up a large proportion of Earth’s biodiversity, yet are also some of the most sensitive systems to environmental perturbation. Biogeographic theory predicts that geologic age, area, and isolation typically drive islands’ diversity patterns, and thus potentially impact non‐native spread and community homogenization across island systems....
Article
Species of knotweeds, Reynoutria spp. Houtt. (Caryophyllales: Polygonaceae), including Japanese knotweed (R. japonica Houtt.), are among the most invasive and ecologically destructive plant species introduced to North America and Europe. The Kyushu strain of the psyllid Aphalara itadori Shinji (Hemiptera: Aphalaridae) has been approved as a biologi...
Article
Full-text available
The recent decline of Phragmites australis stands in the Mississippi River Delta is due, in part, to damage from herbivory by the non-native roseau cane scale, Nipponaclerda biwakoensis. In Louisiana, P. australis communities, known locally as roseau cane, protect the marsh ecosystem from erosion and storm-related impacts, stabilize shipping channe...
Article
Hybridization plays an important and underappreciated role in shaping the evolutionary trajectories of species. Following the introduction of a non-native organism to a novel habitat, hybridization with a native congener may affect the probability of establishment of the introduced species. In most documented cases of hybridization between a native...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have reported a diversity of stressors that may explain continental-scale declines in populations of native pollinators, particularly those in the genus Bombus. However, there has been little focus on the identification of the local-scale dynamics that may structure currently impoverished Bombus communities. For example, the histor...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hybridization plays an important and underappreciated role in shaping the evolutionary trajectories of species. Following the introduction of a non-native organism to a novel habitat, hybridization with a native congener may affect the probability of establishment of the introduced species. In most documented cases of hybridization between a native...
Article
Full-text available
Grapevine red blotch virus (GRBV) is a DNA virus in the family Geminiviridae. This pathogen is the causal agent of grapevine red blotch disease, which affects cultivated grapevines and leads to negative effects on crop quality and yield. GRBV is present in commercial vineyards across North America, indicating spread may have been largely human medi...
Article
Reconstructing the geographic origins of nonnative species is important for studying the factors that influence invasion success, however; these analyses can be constrained by the amount of diversity present in the native and invaded regions, and by changes in the genetic background of the invading population following bottlenecks and/or hybridizat...
Article
Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) have fascinated researchers for centuries due to the elaborate diversity of charismatic galls they produce, the presence of unique reproductive systems (e.g., a form of cyclical parthenogenesis), the possible convergent evolution of semiparasitic gall wasp forms (i.e., “inquilines”), and their multitrophic intera...
Preprint
Reconstructing the geographic origins of invasive species is critical for establishing effective management strategies. Frequently, molecular investigations are undertaken when the source population is not known, however; these analyses are constrained both by the amount of diversity present in the native region and by changes in the genetic backgr...
Article
In Anchorage, Alaska, larvae of the invasive ambermarked birch leafminer (AMBLM), Profenusa thomsoni Konow (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae), are parasitized in leafmines by Lathrolestes thomsoni Reshchikov and L. soperi Reshchikov (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). The first species was introduced to Alaska from Alberta and the Northwest Territories of Can...
Article
The Adelges (Dreyfusia) piceae (Ratzeburg) species complex is a taxonom-ically unstable group of six species. Three of the species are cyclically parthenogenetic [Ad. nordmannianae (Eckstein), Ad. prelli (Grossmann), and Ad. merkeri (Eichhorn)] and three are obligately asexual [Ad. piceae, Ad. schneideri (Börner), and Ad. nebro-densis (Binazzi & Co...
Article
Winter moth, Operophtera brumata L. (Lepidoptera: Geometridae), causes widespread defoliation in both its native and introduced distributions. Invasive populations of winter moth are currently established in the United States and Canada, and pheromone-baited traps have been widely used to track its spread. Unfortunately, a native species, the Bruce...
Article
Full-text available
The cobblestone tiger beetle, Cicindelidia marginipennis (Dejean, 1831) is a North American species specializing in riparian habitats from New Brunswick, Canada, to Alabama in the United States. In the United States, this species is state-listed as threatened or endangered range-wide and periodically receives consideration for federal listing, most...
Article
Full-text available
Despite their large size and striking markings, the identification of bumble bees (Bombus spp.) is surprisingly difficult. This is particularly true for three North American sympatric species in the subgenus Pyrobombus that are often misidentified: B. sandersoni Franklin, B. vagans Smith B. perplexus Cresson. Traditionally, the identification of th...
Article
Full-text available
Here we compare the environmental niche of a highly polyphagous forest Lepidoptera species, the winter moth ( Operophtera brumata ), in its native and invaded range. During the last 90 years, this European tree folivore has invaded North America in at least three regions and exhibited eruptive population behavior in both its native and invaded rang...
Article
Full-text available
In light of the current biodiversity crisis, molecular barcoding has developed into an irreplaceable tool. Barcoding has been considerably simplified by developments in high throughput sequencing technology, but still can be prohibitively expensive and laborious when community samples of thousands of specimens need to be processed. Here, we outline...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have shown that the genetic diversity of species inhabiting temperate regions has been shaped by changes in their distributions during the Quaternary climatic oscillations. For some species, the genetic distinctness of isolated populations is maintained during secondary contact, while for others, admixture is frequently observed. F...
Article
Full-text available
In North America the invasive winter moth (Operopthera brumata) has caused defoliation in forest and fruit crop systems in British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Oregon, and in the northeastern United States (the “Northeast”). In the Northeast, it was previously shown that hybridization is occurring with a native congener, Bruce spanworm (O. bruceata)—a sp...
Article
The recently described oak gall wasp Zapatella davisae Buffington & Melika (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) has caused extensive damage and mortality to black oak trees, Quercus velutina L. (Fagales: Fagaceae), in coastal parts of New England, United States. Like many newly described and/or newly introduced species, it is unclear how long populations of Z....
Article
Full-text available
Ecological communities may be resistant to invasive species through a combination of top-down and bottom-up mechanisms, including predation, competition, parasitism, and disease. In particular, natural enemies that cross over from native species to use newly introduced non-native species as hosts can influence invasive species population dynamics a...
Article
Full-text available
New genetic diagnostic approaches have greatly aided efforts to document global biodiversity and improve biosecurity. This is especially true for organismal groups in which species diversity has been underestimated historically due to difficulties associated with sampling, the lack of clear morphological characteristics, and/or limited availability...
Article
Full-text available
Gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) are phytophagous insects that often go unnoticed; however, when they are introduced to a new area or released from their natural enemies, they have the capacity to outbreak and cause extensive foliar damage. One such outbreaking pest, Zapatella davisae (Cynipidae: Cynipini), causes significant damage and mortalit...
Article
Populations of the recently described black oak gall wasp, Zapatella davisae Buffington (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae), have been identified as the cause of extensive tree damage and mortality to black oaks, Quercus velutina Lamarck (Fagales: Fagaceae), in the northeastern United States. Relatively little is known, however, about the distribution, phylog...
Article
Full-text available
Research pertaining to the two closely‐related microsporidian genera Nosema and Vairimorpha is hindered by inconsistencies in species differentiation within and between the two clades. One proposal to better delimit these genera is to restructure the Nosema around a “True Nosema” clade, consisting of species that share a characteristic reversed rib...
Article
Full-text available
Coevolution may be an important component of the sustainability of importation biological control, but how frequently introduced natural enemies coevolve with their target pests is unclear. Here we explore whether comparative population genetics of the invasive walnut aphid, Chromaphis juglandicola, and its introduced parasitoid, Trioxys pallidus,...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in climate conditions, particularly during the Quaternary climatic oscillations, have long been recognized to be important for shaping patterns of species diversity. For species residing in the western Palearctic, two commonly observed genetic patterns resulting from these cycles are as follows: (1) that the numbers and distributions of gen...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in climate conditions, particularly during the Quaternary climatic oscillations, have long been recognized to be important for shaping patterns of species diversity. For species residing in the western Palearctic, two commonly observed genetic patterns resulting from these cycles are as follows: (1) that the numbers and distributions of gen...
Article
The European winter moth, Operophtera brumata , is a non-native pest in the Northeastern USA causing defoliation of forest trees and crops such as apples and blueberries. This species is known to hybridize with O. bruceata , the Bruce spanworm, a native species across North America, although it is not known if there are hybrid generations beyond F1...
Article
Strains of the exotic parasitoid wasp Trioxys pallidus were introduced on multiple occasions to the western United States resulting in successful classical biological control of aphids in walnut and filbert orchard systems. However, breakdowns in biological control services have been reported in recent years in both orchard systems. To aid in poten...
Chapter
There are few fields of study in ecology where the correct identification of an organism, whether it is to the species or population level, has great an effect on ecosystem functioning and services as in the study of the biological control of pest species. This chapter reviews how incorrect taxonomic determinations can greatly affect the speed, saf...
Article
Three species of invasive knotweeds (Fallopia japonica, Fallopia sachalinensis, and Fallopia × bohemica) cause extensive damage to riparian and roadside habitats in North America. Currently, two strains of the psyllid Aphalara itadori are being evaluated for introduction into the United States and Canada for the biological control of these knotweed...
Article
Full-text available
Armored scale insects and their primary bacterial endosymbionts show nearly identical patterns of co-diversification when viewed at the family level, though the persistence of these patterns at the species level has not been explored in this group. Therefore we investigated genealogical patterns of co-diversification near the species level between...
Data
The following excel spreadsheet can be used to compare estimates of costs for several commonly used molecular techniques, including; Restriction Enzyme Digestion, Barcoding, Microsatellites, and RAD-seq
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Background Illumina sequencing with its high number of reads and low per base pair cost is an attractive technology for development of molecular resources for non-model organisms. While many software packages have been developed to identify short tandem repeats (STRs) from next-generation sequencing data, these methods do not inform the in...
Article
Full-text available
Here we compare rates of molecular evolution in sexual and parthenogenetic lineages of Aspdiotus nerii Bouché (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) using the genealogies of three protein-coding loci from A. nerii (one mitochondrial and two nuclear), and two protein-coding loci from the primary endosymbiont Uzinura diaspidicola Gruwell (Proteobacteria: Gammaprot...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods The introduction of the parasitoid wasp Trioxys pallidus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from Iran led to the dramatically successful biological control of walnut aphids in California. Recently, increases in numbers of aphids in mid-late summer has required the use of insecticide treatments, and the factors responsible for t...
Article
Full-text available
At the same time that molecular researchers are improving techniques to extract DNA from museum specimens, this increased demand for access to museum specimens has created tension between the need to preserve specimens for maintaining collections and morphological research and the desire to conduct molecular analyses. To address these concerns, we...
Data
At the same time that molecular researchers are improving techniques to extract DNA from museum specimens, this increased demand for access to museum specimens has created tension between the need to preserve specimens for maintaining collections and morphological research and the desire to conduct molecular analyses. To address these concerns, we...
Article
Full-text available
Cryptic species are present in many animal groups and they may be best detected through large sample sizes collected over broad geographic ranges. Fine-scale local adaptation has been hypothesized to occur in armoured scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) and a consequence of this process may be multiple cryptic species. We estimate species divers...
Article
Full-text available
Cryptic species are present in many animal groups and they may be best detected through large sample sizes collected over broad geographic ranges. Fine-scale local adaptation has been hypothesized to occur in armoured scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) and a consequence of this process may be multiple cryptic species. We estimate species divers...
Data
Cryptic species are present in many animal groups and they may be best detected through large sample sizes collected over broad geographic ranges. Fine-scale local adaptation has been hypothesized to occur in armoured scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) and a consequence of this process may be multiple cryptic species. We estimate species divers...
Article
Full-text available
Aspidiotus nerii Bouché (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), oleander scale, is a cosmopolitan pest that feeds on >100 families of plants. A previous study of mitochondrial DNA variation in A. nerii suggested a possible Australian origin for the species. Here, we expand upon that study to include four gene regions and multiple Australian samples. We sequenced...
Data
Aspidiotus nerii Bouche ́ (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), oleander scale, is a cosmopolitan pest that feeds on �100 families of plants. A previous study of mitochondrial DNA variation in A. nerii suggested a possible Australian origin for the species. Here, we expand upon that study to include four gene regions and multiple Australian samples. We sequenc...
Article
Armored scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) are among the most invasive insects in the world. They have unusual genetic systems, including diverse types of paternal genome elimination (PGE) and parthenogenesis. Intimate relationships with their host plants and bacterial endosymbionts make them potentially important subjects for the study of co-e...
Article
Full-text available
'Hass' avocado, Persea americana Miller, fruit being imported into California from Mexico are infested with high levels of a previously unknown species of armored scale insect (Hemiptera: Diaspididae). This species has recently been described and given the name Abgrallaspis aguacatae Evans, Watson & Miller. However, the validity of morphological ch...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Invasive insects increasingly affect forested landscapes and have important ecological and economic impacts. This research focuses on population dynamics of winter moth (Operophtera brumata L.), an invasive pest in the northeastern United States. Native to Europe, this is the species’ fourth accidental introduction to North America. The Elkinton lab established the biological control agent Cyzenis albicans across the range of winter moth in the northeastern U.S. Prior research indicates that C. albicans’ ability to control winter moth likely depends on additional mortality from native (resident) natural enemies. This body of research evaluates the identity and role of natural enemies already present in North America (predators, parasitoids, and pathogens) on winter moth, the potential source of these natural enemies, and their interaction with C. albicans on the resulting winter moth population dynamics.