Jeremiah J Peiffer

Jeremiah J Peiffer
Murdoch University · School of Psychology and Exercise Science

PhD Sports Science; Edith Cowan University

About

177
Publications
71,331
Reads
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3,015
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2009 - present
Murdoch University
January 2008 - November 2009
Edith Cowan University

Publications

Publications (177)
Article
Full-text available
This study investigated whether walking with blood flow restriction (BFR) increases acute cardio-respiratory demands to the point that it can be considered an alternative for jogging. Sixteen physically active adults completed five experimental sessions (order randomised), comprising 10 min of treadmill exercise. Two sessions included unrestricted...
Article
Purpose: This study compared training loads and internal:external load ratios from an aerobic interval session at the highest perceptually sustainable intensity with and without blood flow restriction (BFR). Methods: On separate days, 14 endurance cyclists/triathletes completed four 4-minute self-paced aerobic cycling intervals at their highest...
Article
Background: Previous research suggests physical activity attenuates grey and white matter loss; however, there appears to be individual variability in this effect. Understanding factors that can influence the relationship between physical activity and brain volume may enable prediction of individual response. Objective: The current study examine...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Identify whether the application of blood flow restriction (BFR) during walking influences fraction of expired oxygen (FeO2) and carbon dioxide (FeCO2) measures, key variables in the calculation of oxygen consumption (V̇O2) via indirect calorimetry. Design: Randomised cross-over. Methods: On separate visits, sixteen participants comple...
Article
This study examined cardiovascular, perceptual, and neuromuscular fatigue characteristics during and after cycling intervals with and without blood flow restriction (BFR). Fourteen endurance cyclists/triathletes completed four 4-minute self-paced aerobic cycling intervals at the highest sustainable intensity, with and without intermittent BFR (60%...
Preprint
Background: Grey matter atrophy occurs as a function of ageing and is accelerated in dementia. Previous research suggests physical activity attenuates grey matter loss; however, there appears to be individual variability in this effect. Understanding factors that can affect the relationship between physical activity and brain volume may enable pred...
Article
Lifestyle factors such as sleep and physical activity influence risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Higher habitual physical activity and optimal sleep are associated with better cognitive function and lower levels of Alzheimer’s disease biomarkers, including beta‐amyloid (Aß). There is currently a poor understanding of how physical activity ma...
Article
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been recognised as an important global health priority. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), also known as concussion, accounts for up to 90% of all TBI diagnoses. Accumulating evidence also suggests that mTBI may be a risk factor for later‐life cognitive decline and neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer’s disease a...
Article
Objective Exercise has been found to be important in maintaining neurocognitive health. However, the effect of exercise intensity level remains relatively underexplored. Thus, to test the hypothesis that self-paced high-intensity exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness (peak aerobic capacity; VO 2peak ) increase grey matter (GM) volume, we examined...
Article
SEWELL, K.R., K. I. Erickson, S. R. Rainey-Smith, J. Peiffer, H. R. Sohrabi, and B. M. Brown. Relationships Between Physical Activity, Sleep and Cognitive Function: A Narrative Review…NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV 125(1) XXX-XXX, 2021. - Physical activity and exercise can improve cognitive function and reduce the risk for dementia. Other lifestyle factors,...
Article
Smith, NDW, Scott, BR, Girard, O, and Peiffer, JJ. Aerobic training with blood flow restriction for endurance athletes: potential benefits and considerations of implementation. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2021-Low-intensity aerobic training with blood flow restriction (BFR) can improve maximal oxygen uptake, delay the onset of blood lactate...
Article
Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for a large majority of traumatic brain injuries sustained globally each year. Older adults, who are already susceptible to age-related declines to neurocognitive health, appear to be at an increased risk of both sustaining an mTBI and experiencing slower or impaired recovery. There is also growing eviden...
Article
Full-text available
Background Physical inactivity has been consistently linked to increased risk of cognitive decline; however, studies examining the impact of exercise interventions on cognition have produced inconsistent findings. Some observational studies suggest exercise intensity may be important for inducing cognitive improvements; however, this has yet to be...
Presentation
Full-text available
Physical exercise can improve your executive function of verbal fluency, regardless of your mood. Expands on positive findings from Frost et al. (2020) using data from the 'Intense Physical Activity and Cognition - IPAC' study of Brown et al. (2017). Examined effect of a 6mth high intensity aerobic exercise intervention on mood, executive function....
Article
Objectives To investigate the effects of acute branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on cycling performance and neuromuscular fatigue during a prolonged, self-paced cycling time-trial. Design Randomised double-blind counterbalanced crossover. Methods Eighteen recreationally active men (mean ± SD; age: 24.7 ± 4.8 years old; body-weight, B...
Preprint
Full-text available
BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity has been consistently linked to increased risk of cognitive decline; however, studies examining the impact of exercise interventions on cognition have produced inconsistent findings. Some observational studies suggest exercise intensity may be important for inducing cognitive improvements; however, this has yet to be...
Article
This study aimed to determine the accuracy and reliability of estimating repetitions in reserve (RIR) across the squat, bench press, overhead press and prone row exercises, using both free-weight and Smith machine modalities. Twenty-one trained males attended the laboratory on 14-occasions. They were assessed for 1RM for the squat, bench press, pro...
Thesis
Endurance athletes typically spend the large majority of training (> 70%) at low intensities (i.e. below lactate threshold) coupled with short and intermittent bouts of high-intensity exercise or interval training (HIIT). Despite HIIT being a relatively small part of training in terms of duration, it has a substantial effect on the adaptations to e...
Article
This study aimed to determine differences in the validity and reliability of 1RM predictions made using load-velocity relationships in Smith machine and free-weight exercise. Twenty well-trained males attended six sessions, comprising the Smith machine and free-weight squat, bench press, prone row and overhead press. Load-velocity relationship-base...
Article
The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of knowing the load being lifted on the accuracy of RIR estimates, during both moderate-(60% 1RM) and heavy-load (80% 1RM) exercise. Twenty trained males (age: 25.9±4.5 years, height: 181±7 cm, body mass: 86.5±13.7 kg) were assessed for 1-repetition maximum (1RM) in bench press (98.4±16.4 kg) a...
Article
Background There is a paucity of interventional research that systematically assesses the role of exercise intensity and cardiorespiratory fitness, and their relationship with executive function in older adults. To address this limitation, we have examined the effect of a systematically manipulated exercise intervention on executive function. Meth...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeThis study investigated whether regular precooling would help to maintain day-to-day training intensity and improve 20-km cycling time trial (TT) performed in the heat. Twenty males cycled for 10 day × 60 min at perceived exertion equivalent to 15 in the heat (35 °C, 50% relative humidity), preceded by no cooling (CON, n = 10) or 30-min wate...
Article
Full-text available
Some studies have linked bilingualism with a later onset of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Not all studies have observed such relationships, however. Differences in study outcomes may be due to methodological limitations and the presence of confounding factors within studies such as immigration status and l...
Article
Hughes, LJ, Peiffer, JJ, and Scott, BR. Reliability and validity of using the Push Band v2.0 to measure repetition velocity in free-weight and Smith machine exercises. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2019-The purpose of this study was to investigate the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of using the Push Band device 2.0 (PUSH) to...
Article
Purpose: To examine the effect of environmental temperature (TA) on performance and physiological responses (eg, body temperature, cardiopulmonary measures) during a high-intensity aerobic interval session. It was hypothesized that power output would be highest in the 13°C condition and lower in the 5°C, 22°C, and 35°C conditions. Methods: Eleve...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction There is growing evidence for a preventative effect of resistance training on cognitive decline through physiological mechanisms; yet, the effect of resistance training on resting growth factors and homocysteine levels is incompletely understood. This study aimed to investigate the effect of intense resistance training, for 12 weeks, o...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Objectives High-intensity exercise is a potential therapeutic tool to postpone or prevent the onset of cognitive decline. However, there is a lack of sufficient evidence regarding the longitudinal effects of structured resistance training on cognitive function in healthy adults. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tw...
Article
This study examined the acute performance, cardiovascular and local muscular responses to perceived exertion-based high intensity interval exercise using either double- or single-leg cycling. Fifteen healthy middle-aged adults completed, on separate occasions, ten 30-second double-leg intervals interspersed with 60 seconds passive recovery and twen...
Article
Introduction: Regular exercise can reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease through risk factor modification, with high intensity exercise and more recently small muscle mass training providing alternatives to moderate intensity exercise. Methods: This study randomly assigned 53 healthy middle-aged adults (age: 62 ± 6 y) to complete...
Article
Higher cardiorespiratory fitness has been associated with better cognitive function in older adults; yet, this relationship demonstrates a degree of variability across the older adult population. Thus, it is hypothesised that variation in genetic factors may influence the relationship between fitness and cognitive health. One such genetic factor is...
Article
Several prospective cohort studies have reported an association between higher levels of physical activity and decreased risk of cognitive decline and dementia, years later. To support physical activity as a preventative measure against dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD; the most common form of dementia), evidence regarding the underlying...
Article
Full-text available
Two studies were conducted to examine the effects of ice slushy ingestion (ICE) and cold water immersion (CWI) on thermoregulatory and sweat responses during constant (study 1) and self-paced (study 2) exercise. In study 1, 11 men cycled at 40–50% of peak aerobic power for 60 min (33.2 ± 0.3°C, 45.9 ± 0.5% relative humidity, RH). In study 2, 11 men...
Data
Rectal temperature (Tre) response during 60 min of cycling at fixed intensity following 30 min of precooling (study 1). CON, control; CWI, cold water immersion, ICE, ice slushy ingestion. (PDF)
Data
Rectal-to-skin temperature (Tre-Tsk) gradient response during 60 min of cycling at fixed intensity following 30 min of precooling (study 1). CON, control; CWI, cold water immersion, ICE, ice slushy ingestion. (PDF)
Data
Rectal temperature (Tre) response during 60 min of cycling at RPE 15 following 30 min of precooling (study 2). CON, control; CWI, cold water immersion, ICE, ice slushy ingestion. (PDF)
Data
Rectal-to-skin temperature (Tre-Tsk) gradient response during 60 min of cycling at RPE 15 following 30 min of precooling (study 2). CON, control; CWI, cold water immersion, ICE, ice slushy ingestion. (PDF)
Data
Data underlying the findings reported in the present manuscript. CON, control; CWI, cold water immersion, ICE, ice slushy ingestion. (XLSX)
Data
Effect sizes (Cohen’s d) calculated for the mean physiological and perceptual responses, rectal temperature (Tre) and weighted mean body temperature (Tb) at the onset of sweating and sweat sensitivity during steady state exercise (study 1) and during the RPE clamp exercise (study 2). CON, control; CWI, cold water immersion, ICE, ice slushy ingestio...
Article
Full-text available
The global population is aging at an unprecedented rate giving rise to a greater prevalence of age-related illnesses such as dementia and vascular disease. Dementia affects approximately 47 million individuals globally with projections of 130 million by the year 2050. Late-onset Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, accounting fo...
Article
OBJECTIVES: To examine the associations between physical activity duration and intensity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and executive function in older adults. METHODS: Data from ninety-nine cognitively normal adults (age = 69.10 ± 5.1 years n = 54 female) were used in the current study. Physical activity (intensity and duration) was measured with the...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this investigation was to assess the acute changes in growth factors associated with cognitive health following two ecologically valid, intense resistance exercise sessions. Twenty-nine late-middle-aged adults performed one session of either (a) moderate-load resistance exercise or (b) high-load resistance exercise. Venous blood was...
Article
The purpose of this study was to investigate using load-velocity relationships to quantify fluctuations in maximal strength (1-repetition maximum; 1RM) which occur as a result of training-induced fatigue. The nineteen well-trained males (age: 24.3±2.9 years, height: 180.1±5.9 cm, body mass: 84.2±10.5 kg, squat 1RM: 151.1 ± 25.7 kg) who were recruit...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Backpacks are the most popular way of carrying additional weight; however, it puts the body under physical stress and may cause discomfort. It may also increase oxygen demand and energy cost. Manipulation of load placement may relieve the effects carrying a backpack has on the body. Objective: This study investigated physiological an...
Article
New finding: What is the central question of this study? To determine how 14 days of LHTL at simulated altitude alters an individual's metabolomic/metabolic profile? What is the main finding and its importance? This study demonstrated that ∼200 h of moderate simulated altitude exposure showed greater variance in measured metabolites between-person...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Blood flow restriction (BFR) during low-load resistance exercise increases muscle size similarly to high-load training, and may be an alternative to lifting heavy weights for older people at risk of sarcopenia. However, few studies have addressed the safety of such exercise in older people, or whether this is impacted by the actual ex...
Preprint
Full-text available
Higher cardiorespiratory fitness has been associated with enhanced cognitive function in older adults; yet, this relationship demonstrates a degree of variability. Thus, it is hypothesised that variation in genetic factors may influence the relationship between fitness and cognitive health. In this study we evaluate whether the BDNF Val66Met polymo...
Chapter
Cycling is a complex and demanding sport with performance being influenced by a wide range of physical, physiological, biomechanical and psychological factors. While performance is understandably best assessed in real world competition or field settings, laboratory testing can be important in various aspects of athlete development and training opti...
Poster
Full-text available
INTRODUCTION: Performance of steady-state endurance exercise close to lactate threshold is reduced in substantially hot and cold environmental temperatures (TA), demonstrating an inverse U-shaped relationship between TA and endurance performance (Galloway and Maughan, 1997; Peiffer and Abbiss, 2011). Paradoxically, endurance athletes train a small...
Article
This study examined the effect of two forms of exercise on glucose tolerance and concurrent changes in markers associated with the interleukin-6 (IL-6) pathways. Fifteen sedentary, overweight males (29.0±3.1 kg/m2) completed two separate, 3-day trials in randomised and counterbalanced order. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT; 75g) was performed...
Article
Numerous animal studies have reported exercise reduces the accumulation of Alzheimer's disease pathology, including amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau. Furthermore, we previously reported a relationship between higher levels of physical activity (PA) and lower brain Aβ burden in a human population. The recent advent of tau positron emission tomography (PET) tr...
Article
Purpose: This study examined the power output distribution and sprint characteristics of professional female road cyclists. Methods: 31 race files, representing top-five finishes, were collected from seven professional female cyclists. Files were analysed for sprint characteristics including; mean and peak power output, velocity and duration. Th...
Article
Objectives: Blood flow restriction (BFR) during interval cycling may stimulate aerobic and anaerobic adaptations. However, acute physiological responses to BFR interval cycling have not been extensively investigated. Design: Eighteen males completed low-intensity (LI), low-intensity with BFR (LIBFR) and high-intensity (HI) interval cycling sessi...
Article
Introduction: Leg order during sequential single-leg cycling (i.e. exercising both legs independently within a single session) may affect local muscular responses potentially influencing adaptations. This study examined the cardiovascular and skeletal muscle hemodynamic responses during double-leg and sequential single-leg cycling. Methods: Ten...
Article
Full-text available
A large body of epidemiological and experimental data exploring the relationship between physical activity (PA) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are now available. Despite observational evidence supporting a role for PA in delaying the onset of AD, randomised controlled trials have reported mixed findings, likely due to the heterogeneity in study cohor...
Article
This study compared the effect of passive rest (CON) and water immersion at 8.6±0.2°C (CWI9), 14.6±0.3°C (CWI15) and 35.0±0.4°C (thermoneutral water immersion [TWI]) on post-exercise heart rate variability (HRV) indices. In a climate chamber (32.8±0.4°C, 32±5% relative humidity), nine men completed 25 min of cycling at the first ventilatory thresho...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: To examine the effect of post-exercise cold water immersion (CWI) protocols compared with control (CON), on the magnitude and time-course of core temperature (Tc) responses. Methods: Pooled data analyses were used to examine the Tc responses of 157 subjects from previous post-exercise CWI trials in our laboratories. CWI protocols varied...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose: Night games are a regular occurrence for team sport athletes, yet sleep complaints following night competitions are common. The mechanisms responsible for reported sleep difficulty in athletes is not understood. Methods: An observational cross-over design investigating a night netball game and a time matched rest-day in twelve netball a...
Article
Full-text available
Common estimates of external training intensity for resistance exercise do not incorporate inter-set recovery duration, and might not reflect the overall demands of training. This study aimed to assess novel metrics of exercise density (ED) during resistance exercise, and how these related to a physiological marker of internal training intensity as...
Article
This review evaluated the effects of precooling via cold water immersion (CWI) and ingestion of ice slurry/slushy or crushed ice (ICE) on endurance performance measures (e.g. time-to-exhaustion and time trials) and psychophysiological parameters (core [Tcore] and skin [Tskin] temperatures, whole body sweat [WBS] response, heart rate [HR], thermal s...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Inconsistent results from previous studies of exercise and cognitive function suggest that rigorously designed randomized controlled trials are urgently needed. Here, we describe the design of the Intense Physical Activity and Cognition (IPAC) study, which will assess the impact of a 6-month high-intensity exercise intervention on cogn...