Jere H. Lipps

Jere H. Lipps
University of California, Berkeley | UCB · Museum of Paleontology

Ph.D.

About

54
Publications
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1,310
Citations

Publications

Publications (54)
Book
Full-text available
Atlas of Shallow-Water Tropical Benthic Foraminifera From Moorea (Society Islands, French Polynesia). This atlas describes and illustrates the foraminifera from Moorea, French Polynesia. Moorea, a high volcanic island in the south-central Pacific Ocean, which is situated east of the tropical marine diversity hotspot in the Coral Triangle. It is si...
Article
Robert G. (Bob) Douglas, an internationally recognized micropaleontologist and marine geologist, passed away on January 26, 2016, after a long battle with cancer. During his career he pursued a diverse range of research interests, including the study of living foraminifera and modern environments, Cretaceous foraminiferal biostratigraphy, Cretaceou...
Chapter
Full-text available
Although reef-like structures formed in the Neoproterozoic, reefs built by metazoans did not appear until the early Paleozoic. From then until the Recent, reefs diversified, underwent extinctions many times and then diversified again. Reef-inhabiting organisms included many different groups from algae to vertebrates as well as enigmatic, extinct su...
Chapter
Full-text available
Reef organisms are well known for engaging in photosymbiosis in which a heterotrophic protist or animal host partners with one or more kinds of photosynthetic microbes. This relationship provides metabolic advantages in nutrition and rapid calcification, often leading to secretion of massive skeletons in the host. In turn the symbiont receives prot...
Article
Full-text available
Since ciliates rarely possess structures that easily fossilize, we are limited in our ability to use paleontological studies to reconstruct the early evolution of this large and ecologically important clade of protists. Tintinnids, a group of loricate (house-forming) planktonic ciliates, are the only group that has a significant fossil record. Puta...
Article
On 29 October 2013 Professor David B. Scott was co-recipient of the Joseph A. Cushman Award for Excellence in Foraminiferal Research along with Dr. Franco Medioli at the Annual Geological Society of America Meeting in Denver, Colorado. This prestigious award acknowledges Prof. Scott’s significant contributions to the ecology of coastal benthic fora...
Chapter
Full-text available
Photosymbiosis has been an important process in the evolution of ancient reef systems and in reef success today. Modern reefs and many of those in the geologic past inhabited nutrient-depleted settings. The complete collapse of some ancient reef ecosystems may be attributed to the breakdown of the ecologic and physiologic relationships between symb...
Article
Three putative ciliate fossils were described from the Neoproterozoic Doushantuo Formation in China: Eotintinnopsis, Wuji-angella, and Yonyangella. The identity of these fossils is important for our understanding of the origins and early morphological evolution within ciliate clades. Here we compare the homology of the fossil characteristics with t...
Article
Recent molecular studies show multiple cases of cryptic diversification in planktic foraminifera; however, the geographic distribution of the cryptic species is poorly known. Herein, we present the first insight into the cryptic diversity of planktic foraminifera from Northwest Pacific samples. We obtained 97 new SSU rDNA sequences representing 13...
Article
Full-text available
Most bodies of our Solar System are "Frozen Worlds" where the prevailing surface temperature remains at or below freezing. On Earth there are vast permanently frozen regions of permafrost, polar ice sheets, and glaciers and the deep oceans and deep-sea marine sediments have remained at 2-4 °C for eons. Psychrophilic and psychrotrophic microbiota th...
Article
Platysolenites is an agglutinated tube first found in latest Precambrian and occurring abundantly in the Lower Cambrian Tommotian Stage and less so in the overlying Atdabanian Stage. Other tubes have been named-Spirosolenites and Yanischevskyites-that are morphologic variations of Platysolenites. The tube consists mostly of quartz, feldspar and opa...
Article
The university of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP), located on the Berkeley Campus, is a major repository of fossils and paleontological materials. The collection, one of the largest in the nation, originated in 1873 and has been added to continuously since then. In 1921, the Museum of Paleontology was officially initiated with an endowment...
Chapter
The complex of historical events encompassing the origin and early evolution of Metazoa is at once the salient feature and the most significant unresolved biohistorical phenomenon in the history of life. It has been the single most perplexing issue since paleontology emerged as a scientific discipline in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Man...
Book
Several years ago, we realized that the most prominent ideas that had been ex­ pressed about the origin and early evolution of the Metazoa seemed to have been developed chiefly by zoologists using evidence from modern species without reference to the fossil record. Paleontologists had, in fact, put forth their own ideas but the zoological and the p...
Conference Paper
Foraminifera and radiolaria were found in lower and middle Cambrian rocks in the western US. They occur in clastic rocks associated with archaeocyathid bioherms and shales in SE California, SW Nevada, W Utah and Idaho. The foraminifera are agglutinated tubes, straight or coiled; the radiolaria are spherical or flattened wit robust lattices. They oc...
Chapter
This report, and the Workshop discussions leading to it, stem from the growing realization that physical events of short duration may have had frequent, significant, and lasting effects on the Earth’s biota. For the purposes of the report, physical events are considered relevant only if they are: a) relatively sudden, b) have a global or nearly glo...
Article
The species lives at a depth of 3-12 m on coral rubble and around bases of coral heads that possess a small algal turf. Symbionts live in the upper parts of the test, and may provide some of the nutrient requirements for the protozoan.-from Authors
Article
Defining biosignatures, i.e. features that are indicative of past or present life, has been one of the major strategies developed over the last few years for the search of life on the early Earth and in the solar system. Current knowledge about microscopic remnants of fossil organisms, namely microfossils are reviewed, focusing on: (i) studies of r...
Article
Foraminif era have a long geologic record, extending back perhaps to the Cambrian, and they are both abundant and diverse during most of the Phanerozoic. Over 40,000 species now have been described, of which approximately 4000 are living today (Tappan, 1971). They occur in all modern marine communities, and have also been found living in brackish a...
Article
Fishes were collected from twenty-two sites off the Antarctic Peninsula from 62⚬ S to 69⚬ S latitude in 1975. Specimens of thirthy-three species representing seven families were taken. Species associations change with latitude, depth, season and substrate. The Peninsula does appear to be a zone of range overlap between the Patagonian fauna and that...
Chapter
Full-text available
Catastrophic hypotheses for mass extinctions are commonly criticized because many taxa gradually disappear from the fossil record prior to the extinction. Presumably, a geologically instantaneous catastrophe would not cause a reduction in diversity or a series of minor extinctions before the actual mass extinction. Two types of sampling effects, ho...
Article
Planktic foraminifera have been studied in detail for over a hundred years. During this time, they have been useful for biostratigraphic correlation of Cretaceous and younger deep water facies and for paleooceanographic inference. Their paleoecologic utility has been more limited, perhaps because it is based primarily on empirical comparisons of fo...
Article
Pelagic marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) generally invaded the seas rapidly in response to new ecologic opportunities. After cetaceans initially appeared and radiated in the Eocene, they declined in the Oligocene, but radiated into many new adaptive types in the Miocene. Pinnipeds apparently evolved in the earliest Miocene, rapidly radiatin...
Article
Calcareous nannoplankton are abundant in some rocks assigned to the California microfaunal stages. Most species are stratigraphically long ranging, although some have restricted stratigraphic ranges in low-latitude tropical regions. These species permit partial correlation of the California stages with the widely recognized plankton biostratigraphi...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, Los Angeles, 1966. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 235-252). Photocopy.

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