Jenny Paterson

Jenny Paterson
Northumbria University · Department of Psychology

PhD Social Psychology (Leeds)

About

16
Publications
4,290
Reads
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352
Citations
Introduction
I'm a quantitative social psychologist interested in intergroup relations and interpersonal relationships. I am currently working on numerous projects focusing on a wide range of topics including the community impacts of hate crime, intergroup romantic relationships, the dehumanisation of outgroups, and hypodescent in social categorisation.
Additional affiliations
January 2014 - June 2014
University of Sussex
Position
  • Final Year Co-Supervisor
September 2013 - May 2014
University of Sussex
Position
  • Research Assistant
July 2013 - present
University of Sussex
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2009 - December 2012
University of Leeds
Field of study
  • Social Psychology
August 2006 - May 2008
University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
Field of study
  • Social Psychology
August 2002 - May 2006
Berry College
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (16)
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report will focus on the extent and nature of transphobic hate crime and the effects that this type of crime has on trans* people’s attitudes towards criminal justice agencies and, more broadly the government, in relation to hate crime.
Article
Cross-group romantic relationships are an extremely intimate and often maligned form of intergroup contact. Yet, according to intergroup contact theory, these relationships have the potential to improve the intergroup attitudes of others via extended contact. This study combines the interpersonal and intergroup literatures to examine the outcomes a...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Here we present the findings from the 5 year project investigating the indirect effects of hate crimes on Muslim and LGBT communities.
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates the attitudes and emotional reactions of LGBT+ people to enhanced sentencing (ES) and restorative justice (RJ) interventions for hate crime. When forced to choose between interventions, our survey (N = 589) found a preference for the use of RJ over ES, which was perceived to be better at reducing reoffending and supporting...
Data
A short primer on "Pylons ablaze: Examining the role of 5G COVID‐19 conspiracy beliefs and support for violence" published in the British Journal of Social Psychology (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bjso.12394).
Data
Supplementary Materials, as part of Pylons ablaze: Examining the role of 5G COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs and support for violence published in the British Journal of Social Psychology (https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/bjso.12394).
Article
Full-text available
Amid increased acts of violence against telecommunication engineers and property, this pre‐registered study (N = 601 Britons) investigated the association between beliefs in 5G COVID‐19 conspiracy theories and the justification and willingness to use violence. Findings revealed that belief in 5G COVID‐19 conspiracy theories was positively correlate...
Article
Full-text available
Intergroup contact has long been recognized as an important factor in promoting positive intergroup attitudes. However, in operationalizing intergroup attitudes, previous studies have rarely investigated attitudes toward one of the most intimate forms of contact, romantic relationships. In this study (N = 176), we expand the intergroup contact lite...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the indirect impacts of hate crimes on LGBT and Muslim communities in the United Kingdom. Based on 34 qualitative interviews, we explore both the perceived meaning of "community" in the context of targeted victimization, and the emotional and behavioural effects that anti-LGBT and Islamophobic hate crimes have on other members...
Article
Full-text available
A longitudinal study ( N = 774) explored the short and longer term impacts of anti-Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans (LGBT) hate crime experienced directly, indirectly, and through the media. In the short term, being a victim (direct) or personally knowing of a hate crime victim (indirect) was positively associated with vulnerability, emotional res...
Article
Full-text available
In two experimental studies (N = 120; N = 102), we apply intergroup emotions theory (IET) to examine the effects of hate crime on other community members. With participants from an oft-targeted group-Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans people, we are the first to show empirically that hate crimes elicit more pronounced emotional and behavioural respo...
Article
Full-text available
Hate crimes against LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans) individuals have been shown to indi-rectly impact other members of the community (e.g., Noelle, 2002). However, as the LGBT community is a diverse grouping of individuals with various sexual and gender identities, we examined experimen-tally whether reactions were enhanced when participan...
Article
Full-text available
Based on a survey of 593 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people in the United Kingdom, this study shows that direct anti-LGBT hate crimes (measured by direct experiences of victimization) and indirect anti-LGBT hate crimes (measured by personally knowing other victims of hate crime) are highly prolific and frequent experiences for LG...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Sussex Hate Crime Project 1 is a five year research study which is examining the direct and indirect impacts of hate crime on the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGB&T) and Muslim communities throughout England and Wales. Using large scale quantitative surveys, experiments, and qualitative interviews, we have examined the emotional, beh...
Article
Full-text available
Here we review recent developments in the field of indirect intergroup contact, an extension of the classic Contact Hypothesis. Three forms of indirect contact are assessed: extended, vicarious and imagined. The strengths and limitations of each are evaluated. Although not as potent as direct contact, indirect forms of contact generally offer a mor...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
In this 5 year project, we are examining the direct and indirect impacts of hate crime on the Muslim and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Trans (LGB&T) communities throughout the UK.