Jennifer L Wright-Berryman

Jennifer L Wright-Berryman
University of Cincinnati | UC · School of Social Work

PhD

About

12
Publications
2,929
Reads
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123
Citations
Citations since 2016
7 Research Items
102 Citations
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Introduction
I am a suicidologist in the School of Social Work at the University of Cincinnati. I am currently the lead researcher for a peer-to-peer, school-based program called Hope Squad. I am presently designing a study comparing Hope Squad to a gatekeeper-only model.
Additional affiliations
July 2013 - present
University of Cincinnati
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Youth suicide rates have consistently risen over the past decade, and stigma related to mental health may create a barrier to young people seeking help. Schools are a common intercept point for mental health and suicide prevention programming. Hope Squad, a school-based, peer-to-peer, suicide prevention program, uses trained and mentored students n...
Article
Suicide prevention training for health professions students is lacking, often occurring in disciplinary silos. The present study reports outcomes from an interprofessional education (IPE)-based suicide prevention course for health professions students across a variety of disciplines (e.g., social work, counseling, public health). Using a quasi-expe...
Article
To date, no suicide behavior data related to school-based peer suicide prevention programs have been published. The Hope Squad program uses trained students to intentionally facilitate help-seeking with distressed peers. Suicide concern contact data (SCCD) from school counseling centers were collected from 2013 to 2017 as part of routine outcome-ba...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Individuals with severe mental illness (SMI) often suffer from comorbid physical health conditions that reduce quality of life and longevity. The integrated care movement has improved access to primary care services, but system change does not necessarily impact health behaviors. In an effort to better understand health behaviors of per...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Despite the growing trend of integrating primary care and mental health services, little research has documented how consumers with severe mental illnesses manage comorbid conditions or view integrated services. Objectives: We sought to better understand how consumers perceive and manage both mental and physical health conditions and...
Article
People with severe mental illness (SMI) often have physical health comorbidities that are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Although work is being done to integrate physical and behavioral health care in order to address the primary health-care needs of persons with SMI, very little is known about their health-care behaviors and h...
Article
People vary in the amount of control they want to exercise over decisions about their healthcare. Given the importance of patient-centered care, accurate measurement of these autonomy preferences is critical. This study aimed to assess the factor structure of the Autonomy Preference Index (API), used widely in general healthcare, in individuals wit...
Article
Assertive community treatment is known for improving consumer outcomes, but is difficult to implement. On-site fidelity measurement can help ensure model adherence, but is costly in large systems. This study compared reliability and validity of three methods of fidelity assessment (on-site, phone-administered, and expert-scored self-report) using a...
Article
Objective: To explore mental health consumer and provider responses to a computerized version of the Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) program. Method: Semistructured interviews were conducted to gather data from 6 providers and 12 consumers who participated in a computerized prototype of the IMR program. An inductive-consensus-based approac...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Monitoring fidelity of assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is costly. This study investigated the reliability and validity of a less burdensome approach: self-reported assessment. Methods: Phone-administered and self-reported assessments were compared for 16 ACT teams. Team leaders completed a self-report protocol providing info...
Article
Full-text available
Assertive community treatment (ACT) is an evidence-based practice that provides intensive, in vivo services for adults with severe mental illness. Some ACT and intensive case management teams have integrated consumers as team members with varying results. The authors reviewed the literature examining the outcomes of having consumer providers on cas...

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