Jennifer M. Tomlinson

Jennifer M. Tomlinson
Colgate University · Department of Psychology

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24
Publications
53,131
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392
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Partner support for self-expansion has been associated with long-term health and retirement satisfaction, yet the underlying physiological correlates are unknown. We predicted that partner support for self-expansion would be associated with short-term physiology and behavior as well as long-term goal pursuit. And 100 couples with at least one retir...
Article
We investigated goal conflict between romantic relationships and individual goals. In Study 1, 25 retired couples (N = 50) discussed a goal perceived as conflicting with the relationship. Dyadic results suggest both actor and partner general perceptions of goal conflict predicted lower relationship satisfaction. Goal conflict around the goal discus...
Article
Objectives Research shows that social participation is beneficial for overall health and well-being. Yet, no research to our knowledge has examined whether social participation is associated with greater marital satisfaction in middle-aged and older couples. We hypothesized that middle-aged and older adults would have greater marital satisfaction w...
Article
Objective: Theories suggest that laughter decreases negative affect and enhances social bonds; however, no studies have examined the benefits of laughter on stress biomarkers in dyads. This study examined the hypotheses that individual and shared laughter would be associated with lower blood pressure reactivity and decreased self-reported and perc...
Article
Full-text available
Individual effects of laughter in reducing stress are well-documented. However, no research has examined dyadic associations between laughter and blood pressure in spousal support interactions. This study examined the hypotheses that individual and shared laughter would be associated with lower blood pressure and distress during a support interacti...
Article
Retirement can be a turbulent time of life in which people must navigate changes in their identity from ending a career and beginning a new phase of life. However, retirement can also provide opportunities for growth or self-expansion. We examined the benefits of partner support for self-expansion by using longitudinal evidence (at 3 time points) i...
Chapter
Interdependence, Interaction, and Close Relationships - edited by Laura V. Machia June 2020
Article
Cambridge Core - Social Psychology - Interdependence, Interaction, and Close Relationships - edited by Laura V. Machia
Chapter
People are inherently motivated to improve themselves over the course of their lives by developing competencies, pursuing and achieving personal goals, and continually becoming more efficacious. Working toward self-development can entail physical or psychological risk (i.e., injury, embarrassment), so individuals are most willing to accept growth o...
Article
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Cambridge Core - Social Psychology - The New Psychology of Love - edited by Robert J. Sternberg
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Participation in shared self-expanding activities benefits both relationships and the self. However, most studies use tasks that combine self-expansion and arousal within one activity, making it difficult to know what drives the benefits. We tested the distinct effects of self-expansion and arousal in four studies. In Studies 1 and 2, 35 married co...
Article
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Deciding to embrace challenging opportunities may present one life context through which individuals may thrive, and these decisions may be influenced by one’s significant relationships. Married couples were unobtrusively videotaped as one couple-member was presented with a challenging opportunity and decided whether to accept it. We assessed inter...
Article
Understanding women’s attitudes toward retirement is crucial for being able to help women adjust to this transition. The present study uses interviews and questionnaires to understand retirement ambivalence and the role that close relationships play in women’s retirement experiences. Findings indicate that women have mixed feelings about retirement...
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The goal of this work was to test a theoretical model of relational catalyst (RC) support provision that promotes thriving in non-adverse times. We tested a pathway proposed by Feeney and Collins that explains how RC support in the context of close relationships might lead to thriving. We proposed that once RC support has been received, it function...
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Previous research indicates that partner responsiveness and self-expansion play key roles in the creation, maintenance, and improvement of close relationships. This experiment examined the hypothesis that active (vs. passive) partner support for an individual’s opportunity for self-expansion would increase relationship satisfaction. In an experimen...
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This research explored the possibility of feeling over-idealized, or ‘‘put on a pedestal’’ by a partner, examining whether there is an optimal level of perceived idealization, such that too little or too much is detrimental. Perceived over-idealization was manipulated experimentally with 99 dating couples (Study 1), and in surveys of 89 married (St...
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Relationships are strongly influenced by the perceptions of how one’s partner feels about oneself, yet little is known about the nature of these perceptions or how they relate to outcomes. This study introduces a construct: perceived inclusion of the other in the self (IOS-perceived). IOS-perceived extends the “inclusion of the other in the self” (...
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This investigation examined the importance of underlying motivations in predicting secure base support behavior, as well as the extent to which support motivations are predicted by individual differences in attachment orientation. Participants were 189 married couples who participated in two laboratory sessions. During a questionnaire session, coup...
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Using data from a national sample of informal caregivers to older adults, we identify predictors of lack of choice and the consequences of lack of choice in taking on the caregiving role. A national telephone survey with 1397 caregivers was carried out to assess whether respondents had a choice in taking on the caregiving role, their demographic ch...
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We examined whether accuracy of affective forecasting for significant life events was moderated by a theoretically relevant individual difference (anxious attachment), with different expected relations to predicted and actual happiness. In 3 studies (2 cross-sectional, 1 longitudinal), participants predicted what their happiness would be after ente...

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