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Jennifer Beissinger Tennessen

Jennifer Beissinger Tennessen
National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration · Northwest Fisheries Science Center

PhD

About

21
Publications
4,495
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335
Citations

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Killer whales face many anthropogenic threats including vessel traffic, noise, and reduced prey availability. Here, we use high-resolution suction-cup Dtags to study the behavior of endangered Southern Resident killer whales that rely on biosonar to hunt salmon, and investigate how proximate vessels affect foraging behavio...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Understanding ambient noise effects on foraging ecology of endangered killer whales is a necessary step toward predicting population-level consequences of acoustic disturbance. However, this has been limited by the difficulty of identifying prey capture which typically occurs out of sight, and by the challenge of obtaining...
Article
Full-text available
Vessel traffic is prevalent throughout marine environments. However, we often have a limited understanding of vessel impacts on marine wildlife, particularly cetaceans, due to challenges of studying fully-aquatic species. To investigate vessel and acoustic effects on cetacean foraging behavior, we attached suction-cup sound and movement tags to end...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate knowledge of behavior is necessary to effectively manage the effects of human activities on wildlife, including vessel-based whale-watching. Yet, the wholly aquatic nature of cetaceans makes understanding their basic behavioral ecology quite challenging. An endangered population of killer whales faces several identified threats including p...
Article
Anthropogenic activities that have negative consequences on foraging outcomes warrant special concern in endangered species. Prey availability and vessel disturbance are identified risk factors of endangered Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW) as vessels and associated sounds can mask echolocation signals used for foraging and/or disrupt foragin...
Article
Full-text available
Global expansion of human activities is associated with the introduction of novel stimuli, such as anthropogenic noise, artificial lights and chemical agents. Progress in documenting the ecological effects of sensory pollutants is weakened by sparse knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these effects. This severely limits our capacity to devise mi...
Article
There is growing interest in the use of glucocorticoid (GC) hormones to understand how wild animals respond to environmental challenges. Blood is the best medium for obtaining information about recent GC levels; however, obtaining blood requires restraint and can therefore be stressful and affect GC levels. There is a delay in GCs entering blood, a...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral data can be important for effective management of endangered marine predators, but can be challenging to obtain. We utilized suction cup-attached biologging tags equipped with stereo hydrophones, triaxial accelerometers, triaxial magnetometers, pressure and temperature sensors, to characterize the subsurface behavior of an endangered pop...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Foraging in toothed whales and dolphins is fundamentally tied to the use of sound. Resident-type killer whales (Orcinus orca) use echolocation to locate and capture fast-moving salmon and other fish prey. In addition to prey availability, disturbance from vessels and noise is a threat to the endangered Southern Resident ki...
Article
Full-text available
Studies of odontocete foraging ecology have been limited by the challenges of observing prey capture events and outcomes underwater. We sought to determine whether subsurface movement behavior recorded from archival tags could accurately identify foraging events by fish-eating killer whales. We used multisensor bio-logging tags attached by suction...
Article
Human activities impose novel pressures on amphibians, which are experiencing unprecedented global declines, yet population-level responses are poorly understood. A growing body of literature has revealed that noise is an anthropogenic stressor that impacts ecological processes spanning subcellular to ecosystem levels. These consequences can impose...
Article
Prey availability and disturbance from vessels and noise are identified threats to endangered Southern Resident killer whales. Vessel noise can mask echolocation signals used for hunting and/or disrupt foraging with implications for energy acquisition in a likely prey-limited population. We utilized suction cup-attached digital acoustic recording t...
Article
Full-text available
Sound from transoceanic shipping is a major component of ocean noise budgets. Baleen whale communication may be particularly vulnerable to shipping noise impacts due to overlap in the frequencies of signals and noise. Baleen whales rely upon acoustic signals to mediate a variety of social interactions when separated beyond visual range. We investig...
Article
Environmental noise is increasing worldwide, limiting the space available for species to send and receive important acoustic information. Many invasive species produce acoustic signals that alter the spectrotemporal characteristics of available signalling space. This provides an opportunity to test ideas about competitive exclusion by quantifying w...
Article
The ecological impacts of increasing levels of anthropogenic noise in marine and freshwater systems are of growing public interest. Recent emphasis on the physiological approaches to identifying the impacts of noise has led to increased recognition that anthropogenic noise is an environmental stressor. We briefly review the research on noise-induce...
Article
Full-text available
Male reproduction is not only constrained by the number of encountered females but also by physiological limitations, including sperm production and the ability to sustain courtship and mating. Over a breeding season, sperm stores may drop in tandem with male energetic reserves or motivation, confounding the constraints imposed by sperm quantity wi...
Article
Full-text available
Human-generated noise has profoundly changed natural soundscapes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, imposing novel pressures on ecological processes. Despite interest in identifying the ecological consequences of these altered soundscapes, little is known about the sublethal impacts on wildlife population health and individual fitness. We prese...
Article
Full-text available
The natural acoustic environment has undergone substantial changes over the past century due to human activities, creating novel soundscapes. Much research has focused on the impacts of anthropogenic noise on acoustic communication, including noise from transportation, construction, energy development, and defense. The impact of acoustic invasive s...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Human-induced rapid environmental change is creating novel habitats that impose new selective pressures on native species. For example, noise created by human activities can be heard at varying levels throughout the world. This noise “pollution” can pose challenges for animals that rely on sound for survival and reprod...
Article
Marine mammals evolved alongside naturally occurring noise in underwater environments, but recent increases in ocean anthropogenic noise present challenges to effective acoustic communication. Several species of marine mammals have demonstrated compensation strategies to avoid masking, including modifying call duration, frequency, rate, or amplitud...

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