Jennifer A. Reich

Jennifer A. Reich
University of Colorado | UCD · Department of Sociology

Ph.D.

About

57
Publications
11,455
Reads
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901
Citations
Introduction
Jennifer A. Reich is Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado Denver. Jennifer does research in Social Policy, Healthcare, and Qualitative Social Research. Their most recent publication is 'Reproductive Justice, Vaccine Refusal, and the Uneven Landscape of Choice'.
Additional affiliations
September 2014 - present
University of Colorado
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2004 - June 2014
University of Denver
Position
  • Assistant Professor, Associate Professor

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Building on the definition offered by Aspers and Corte, I argue that qualitative research is not qualitative simply because it encodes for the ability “to get closer” to the phenomenon being studied, so much as it is anchored by a methodological obligation to critically examine how and why that closeness matters. Qualitative research considers the...
Article
Full-text available
Politically conservative Americans are less likely than those who identify as liberal to report a willingness to get a vaccine against coronavirus disease 2019. Using data from the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Survey from November 2020 to February 2021, the authors find that this partisan divide in vaccine hesitancy has increased over time. Recent schol...
Article
Full-text available
In the US, birth has become a carefully planned experience for those with the greatest access to resources. Pregnancy preparations, including prenatal care, childbirth education, and peer interactions, encourage women to act as informed consumers, to communicate their own values, beliefs, and preferences in labor and delivery, and to challenge heal...
Article
“Though small, the recent protests we've seen across the U.S. signal what is likely to come as governments grapple with how to move forward, particularly if a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing the pandemic becomes available.”
Article
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Introduction: Healthcare costs are rising, and clinical pathways (CPW) are one means to promote high-value care by standardizing care and improving outcomes without compromising cost or quality. However, providers do not always follow CPW, and our understanding of their perceptions is limited. Our objective was to examine pediatric hospital medici...
Article
Parents who confidently reject vaccines and other forms of medical intervention often seek out pediatric care, medical treatments, and prescription medications for their children in ways that seem to contradict these views. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 34 parents who rejected some or all vaccines for their children, this article examines the...
Article
Introduction: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an unexpected event that can render patients incapable of decision-making, requiring a surrogate decision maker (SDM), most often a family member, to be engaged. Yet how SDMs understand the information provided, and how they view their experience of making decisions for cardiac arrest patients...
Article
Despite measurable benefits of childhood vaccines, mothers with high levels of social privilege are increasingly refusing some or all vaccines for their children. These mothers are often clustered geographically or networked socially, providing information, emotional support, and validation for each other. Mothers who reject vaccines may face disap...
Article
Privilege, distrust, individual choice, and parental care all factor into vaccine resistance, but the consequences are anything but personal.
Article
Laws requiring evidence of vaccination before children can enter schools or child care have been key to public health. However, as parents increasingly reject vaccines for their children, they rely on legal exemptions that allow children to access these settings without vaccination. Using qualitative data from interviews, ethnographic observations,...
Chapter
Public health programs facilitate access to resources that not only provide individuals’ options but also often foreclose individual preference through prescriptive requirements. This chapter takes two disparate cases from public health – vaccines and family planning –that reveal patterns of inequality in who has access to individual choice and who...
Poster
Relationship between patient-perceived treatment burden and medication adherence in heart transplant recipients
Article
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Hospital initiatives to promote pain management may unintentionally contribute to excessive opioid prescribing. To better understand hospitalists' perceptions of satisfaction metrics on pain management, the authors conducted 25 interviews with hospitalists. Transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify emergent themes. Hospitalist...
Article
Full-text available
Public health systems in the USA and elsewhere recommend vaccination for children from birth through college. Some vaccines target diseases that are easily spread through casual contact, others—like those against hepatitis B and the human papilloma virus (HPV)—target infections spread though more intimate contact, including the exchange of bodily f...
Poster
Qualitative assessment of patient-perceived treatment burden following cardiac transplantation
Book
Full-text available
The measles outbreak at Disneyland in December 2014 spread to a half-dozen U.S. states and sickened 147 people. It is just one recent incident that the medical community blames on the nation’s falling vaccination rates. Still, many parents continue to claim that the risks that vaccines pose to their children are far greater than their benefits. Giv...
Poster
Qualitative assessment of patient-perceived treatment burden following cardiac transplantation
Article
Background: Pain is a frequent symptom among patients in the hospital. Pain management is a key quality indicator for hospitals, and hospitalists are encouraged to frequently assess and treat pain. Optimal opioid prescribing, described as safe, patient-centered, and informed opioid prescribing, may be at odds with the priorities of current hospita...
Article
Full-text available
Neoliberal cultural frames of individual choice inform mothers' accounts of why they refuse state-mandated vaccines for their children. Using interviews with 25 mothers who reject recommended vaccines, this article examines the gendered discourse of vaccine refusal. First, I show how mothers, seeing themselves as experts on their children, weigh pe...
Article
Full-text available
This article explores how online communications and social networking sites raise new ethical and methodological questions for qualitative researchers who design studies to be primarily ‘off-line’. The author explores how social media affect efforts to recruit participants, gain informed consent, collect data, leave the field, and disseminate resul...
Book
Full-text available
A collection of essays, framed with original introductions, Reproduction and Society: Interdisciplinary Readings helps students to think critically about reproduction as a social phenomenon. Divided into six rich and varied sections, this book offers students and instructors a broad overview of the social meanings of reproduction and offers opportu...
Article
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Emily Gillette, a twenty-seven-year-old mother, was flying from Vermont to New York with her family. As the plane sat at the gate, Gillette sat in the window seat in the second-to-last row, discreetly breastfeeding her twenty-two-month-old daughter; her husband was seated next to her. According to Gillette, a flight attendant tried to hand her a bl...
Chapter
Full-text available
Parents employ various strategies to make decisions they believe are in their children's best interests. Their decisions are informed by and reflect a complex web of meaning made up of interpretations of culture, experience, tradition, media, peers, expert advice, and their own sense of morality (Bobel 2001; Hulbert 2003; Lareau 2003). The interpla...
Article
The child welfare system is founded on a belief that children are sometimes endangered by their parents or caregivers and must be saved by agents of the state. Children are perceived as objects to be saved, but they are rarely seen as active strategists in their interactions with child welfare system social workers. Using ethnographic data collecte...
Article
Full-text available
Many men report a profound experience associated with the abortion of a fetus they coconceived. Yet the meanings of abortion for men remain underinvestigated. Using data from in-depth interviews with twenty men involved in thirty abortions, this article explicates a masculinist discourse of abortion. By examining how men account for the process of...
Article
The child welfare system remains one of the most important welfare institutions in regulating family life and meanings of gender. However, it has largely escaped sociological analysis. This article provides a framework for thinking about the meanings of state intervention in family life and describes the legal and procedural machinations of the sys...
Article
Full-text available
Hurricane Katrina resulted in the relocation of 1.5 million Americans from the Gulf Coast to other parts of the country, including Colorado, where this study was conducted. Those displaced by natural disasters face significant challenges as they deal with the loss of their social networks, property, income, and sources of emotional support, while a...
Article
The child welfare system is responsible for identifying long-term caregivers for children whose biological parents are unable or unwilling to care for them. Although grandparents are increasingly identified as custodians for their grandchildren, little is known about how grandparents are assessed by state actors. Using ethnographic data, this artic...
Article
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There is growing recognition of the need by funding agencies, universities, and research units for interdisciplinary research to tackle complex societal problems that cannot be adequately addressed by single disciplines alone. Interdisciplinary collaboration capitalizes on a diversity of perspectives and practices that each discipline offers in hop...
Article
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Using in-depth interviews with 20 men involved in 30 abortions, this paper examines how men assign responsibility for the occurrence of unintended pregnancy and describe the decision-making process that led to the termination of a pregnancy they co-conceived. Results indicate that a spectrum exists in how men perceive responsibility for pregnancy p...
Article
Full-text available
Contributing to a body of theory that advocates for reflexivity and consideration of embodiment by social researchers, this article explores aspects of performing qualitative research—fieldwork and interviews—on intersections of the private family and the public state while visibly pregnant. Drawing on the author's personal experience of collecting...
Article
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Article
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In the U.S., child protective services (CPS), alarge welfare bureauuacyrun on a county level, is empowered to investigate allegations of child abuse and neglect and to determine whether a child can safelyremain in the home or must be removed. Over three million children in the U.S. each year are reportedly abused or neglected with over one million...

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