Jennifer Kent

Jennifer Kent
University of Technology Sydney | UTS · Institute for Sustainable Futures

BSc (Hons) MEL PhD

About

9
Publications
1,579
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58
Citations
Introduction
Jennifer Kent currently works at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney. Jennifer does transdiciplinary research in Qualitative Social Research, Social Theory, Deliberative Deocracy and Sustainability Transitions. Her book, 'Community Action and Climate Change.' (Routledge UK, 2016) considers how grassroots groups engaged in voluntary climate change action develop their democratic agency and contribute to environmental governance.

Publications

Publications (9)
Conference Paper
The aims of this presentation are two-fold: a) explore the significant role that teaching and learning can play in illuminating tensions, contradictions and opportunities in contemporary society, structured around four key areas: science and media literacy; critical awareness of business-as-usual; risk frameworks; and futuring methods for developin...
Article
Full-text available
Effective environmental governance requires institutional change. While some actors work to change institutions, others resist change by defending and maintaining institutions. Much of this institutional work is ‘meaning work’, which we define as the practice of crafting, adapting, connecting and performing meanings to purposively create, maintain...
Article
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The aim of this paper is to identify some of the issues in writing a transdisciplinary doctoral thesis and to develop strategies for addressing them, particularly focusing on the presentation of data and data analysis. The paper, based on the authors’ own experience, offers guidance to, and invites further comment from, transdisciplinary doctoral c...
Book
The failure of recent international negotiations to progress global action on climate change has shifted attention to the emergence of grassroots sustainability initiatives. These civil society networks display the potential to implement social innovation and change processes from the ‘bottom up’. Recent scholarship has sought to theorize grassroot...
Article
Full-text available
A systemic approach to deliberative democracy de-emphasises the role of discrete deliberative experiments involving minipublics. Instead, this systemic perspective focuses attention on the quality of deliberation achieved throughout distributed governance systems. It opens up the possibility that institutions that do not appear deliberative in isol...
Article
Full-text available
Whereas global compacts, such as the Kyoto Protocol, have yet to consolidate action from governments on climate change, there has been increasing emphasis and acknowledgement of the role of individuals (as citizens and consumers) as contributors to climate change and as responsible agents in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Recently, along with...
Article
Society is becoming increasingly aware of the need for education to play a key role in integrating knowledge and understanding about sustainability into practical, vocational skills which can be used in the workplace. Education for sustainability is now a widely accepted concept which seeks to promote and develop sustainability skills and awareness...
Article
Vocational education and training (VET) is often considered the enigma of education. For those that work in or research sustainable education within the schools and higher education sections, VET appears somewhat like the mysterious second cousin: often difficult to access and difficult to understand. VET differs quite markedly from the other educa...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The goal of this research is to comprehend the experience of students and educators in Australian universities and their response to the delivery of 'crisis' subjects. As feelings of environmental grief, nihilism, ecodepression and climate anxiety become more common in the student body, educators need the knowledge and resources to help students deal with these emotional impacts. The aim of this research is to investigate the affective dimension of learning experiences in order to understand more about the different ways that learning material can impact students on a subjective level. The research will gather insights from educators within the tertiary context who are engaged with these issues in order to develop pedagogical strategies that can support the personal and professional agency of students and educators.