Jennifer Karberg

Jennifer Karberg
Nantucket Conservation Foundation · Science and Stewardship Department

MS, PhD

About

17
Publications
2,989
Reads
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130
Citations
Introduction
I'm the Research Program Supervisor for a small non-profit conservation and research organization on Nantucket Island, MA. My primary love is wetland ecology and carnivorous plants as well as overall ecosystem management and rare species ecology.
Additional affiliations
August 2008 - present
Nantucket Conservation Foundation
Position
  • Research Program Supervisor
September 2004 - December 2004
Mountain Top University
Position
  • Instructor - Wetland Ecology
May 2002 - May 2008
Michigan Technological University
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
May 2004 - May 2008
Michigan Technological University
Field of study
  • Wetland Ecology
May 2002 - May 2004
Michigan Technological University
Field of study
  • Wetland Ecology
August 1997 - May 2001
University of Michigan
Field of study
  • Plant Biology

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
Development of coastal New England has led to the replacement of up to 37% of salt marshes with degraded freshwater wetlands, primarily through tidal restrictions. Removing these restrictions to restore salt marsh ecology would improve water quality, increase flood and storm protection, nutrient filtration, erosion control, and carbon sequestration...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal sandplains provide habitat for a suite of rare and endangered plant and wildlife species in the northeastern United States. These early successional plant communities were maintained by natural and anthropogenic disturbances including salt spray, fire, and livestock grazing, but over the last 150 years, a decrease in anthropogenic disturban...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Technical progress report examining salt marsh and shrub wetland response to a large scale overwash and sand-burial event at Hither Creek Nantucket. This report examines one year post- disturbance event.
Article
Sandplain grassland and coastal heathland are globally rare communities threatened by succession, development, and shoreline change. Restricted mainly to coastal plains of the Northeast, they provide vital habitat for many state and regionally rare species, highlighting their importance for conservation and restoration. Brush-cutting and prescribed...
Article
The Medouie Creek wetland complex on Nantucket Island, MA was historically one contiguous salt marsh. Diking in the 1930s caused tidal restriction, creating a freshwater wetland colonized by Phragmites australis. To restore salt marsh habitat, the tidal restriction was removed and tidal salt water hydrology reestablished. Soil pore water salinity i...
Article
Full-text available
On Nantucket Island, MA, the present range of coastal sandplain grasslands is primarily attributed to intense and prolonged historic sheep grazing following European settlement. The maintenance of this early successional habitat (ranked S-1 or “critically imperiled” in Massachusetts) relies on disturbance-based land-management tools. Habitat manage...
Article
Full-text available
I n 2008, the Nantucket Conservation Foundation (NCF) initiated a salt marsh restoration project at the Medouie Creek Wetland Complex, Nantucket, Massachusetts. This involved installing a box culvert under a restrictive dike road to reconnect tidal, saltwater hydrology throughout the marsh, in which the restricted portion had converted to freshwate...
Article
Full-text available
Globally rare sandplain grassland and coastal heathland plant communities of Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, merit high conservation priority because they support many rare and endangered species. Management (brush-cutting, grazing, and prescribed fire) has been effective in maintaining these communities, but less successful in transforming overgr...
Article
Full-text available
Sarracenia purpurea, the northern pitcher plant, inhabits three very different wetland habitats throughout its range: two acidic, low nutrient wetland types (Sphagnum and sand substrate-based) and one alkaline wetland type (marl substrate-based) located primarily within the Great Lakes region. This study attempted to classify the nutrient status of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Technical Report utilizing property-level vegetation monitoring to examine differences in plant composition under two different management regimes in a rare sandplain grassland/heathland. Management included dormant season annual mowing on one property and periodic prescribed fire on the other. This comparison indicated a much more depauperate vege...
Article
Full-text available
The carnivorous wetland plant, Sarracenia purpurea (the northern pitcher plant) is native to eastern and Midwestern North America. This species is abundant within its habitat but suitable habitat is increasingly scarce, raising interest in S. purpurea restoration and conservation. Complicating conservation planning, two controversial subspecies of...
Article
Full-text available
Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore protects one of the few remaining populations of northern pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) in the state. This population, located at the Indiana Dunes Pinhook Bog property, is isolated within an extensively developed landscape along the southern rim of Lake Michigan east of Gary, Indiana. Consequently, the nation...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical peatlands form in at least two distinct altitudinal zones, namely lowlands and high mountains. Unlike lowland tropical peatlands, which are typically forested, tropical mountain peatlands are dominated by cushion plants, bryophytes and herbaceous plants. Tropical mountain peatlands are poorly understood and little information is available...
Article
Full-text available
Restoring plant populations requires an understanding of plant morphological adaptation to site locations and population genetic diversity and relatedness. This study examined the genetic and morphological diversity of Sarracenia purpurea L. within the natural fragmentation of western Lake Superior. Populations of S. purpurea were compared among th...

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