Jennifer Kaminski

Jennifer Kaminski
Wright State University | WSU · Department of Mathematics and Statistics

About

17
Publications
9,884
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680
Citations
Citations since 2017
1 Research Item
317 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230204060

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
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Background There is anecdotal evidence that many elementary teachers integrate mathematics lessons and art activities by having students first make colorful, rich material that is subsequently used in an instructional activity. However, it is unclear whether such activities effectively promote learning and transfer of mathematical concepts. The goa...
Article
Educational material often includes engaging perceptual information. However, this perceptual information is often extraneous and may compete with the deeper to-be-learned structure, consequently hindering either the learning of relevant structure or its transfer to new situations. This hypothesis was tested in 4 experiments in which 6- to 8-year-o...
Article
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Most theories of analogical transfer focus on similarities between the learning and transfer domains, where transfer is more likely between domains that share common surface features, similar elements, or common interpretations of structure. We suggest that characteristics of the learning instantiation alone can give rise to different levels of tra...
Article
Abstract— Mathematical concepts are often difficult to acquire. This difficulty is evidenced by failure of knowledge to transfer to novel analogous situations. One approach to this challenge is to present the learner with a concrete instantiation of the to-be-learned concept. Concrete instantiations communicate more information than their abstract,...
Article
What factors affect transfer of knowledge is a complex question. In recent research, we demonstrated that concreteness of the learning domain is one such factor (Kaminski, Sloutsky, & Heckler, 2008). Even when prompted and given no time delay, participants who learned a concrete instantiation of a mathematical concept failed to transfer their knowl...
Article
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Undergraduate students may benefit more from learning mathematics through a single abstract, symbolic representation than from learning multiple concrete examples.
Article
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Motivated by the possibility that some common scientific misconceptions are caused by learning biases that create undesired associations, we examine the effect of salience on associative learning tasks and test two methods to counter-train undesired associations learned during training. Experiment 1 tests the extent to which a cue can be learned in...
Article
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Blocking effects were examined in an associative learning task in which to-be-learned cues varied along two dimensions. Experiment 1 replicated the standard blocking effect when to-be-learned cues had two predictive dimensions. In Experiment 2, cues varied on one predictive dimension and a second non-predictive dimension. Results were that blocking...
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The effects on transfer of learning multiple instantiations were investigated. Undergraduate college students learned one or more artificial instantiations of a simple mathematical concept. Some students were presented with instantiations that communicated concreteness relevant to the to-be-learned concept, while others learned generic instantiatio...
Article
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A classic blocking design is modified by varying the relative salience of the blocked and the blocking cue. It is found that, in accordance with the learned inattention theory of blocking, the amount of blocking is diminished when the blocked cue is more salient than the blocking cue. In addition, when studying the patterns of answers about the con...
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This study investigated the nature of internal representations constructed from learning concrete or generic instantiations of an abstract concept. Undergraduate students learned instantiations of a mathematical group that were generic, communicated concreteness relevant to the concept, or communicated concreteness irrelevant to the concept. Studen...
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The effects of relevant concreteness on learning and transfer were investigated. Sixth grade students learned artificial instantiations of a simple mathematical concept. Some students were presented with instantiations that communicated concreteness relevant to the to-be-learned concept, while others learned generic instantiations involving abstrac...
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Full-text available
A goal of successful learning is the transfer of learned knowledge to novel situations. However, spontaneous transfer is notoriously difficult to achieve. In this research, we argue that learning and transfer can be facilitated when knowledge is expressed in an abstract, generic form. In Experiments 1 and 2, undergraduate students learned two isomo...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of relevant concreteness on learning and transfer were investigated. Undergraduate students learned instantiations of an algebraic group. Some students were presented with representations that communicated concreteness relevant to the to-be-learned concept, while others learned generic representations involving abstract symbols. Results...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of this experiment was to investigate elementary school children's ability to acquire basic fraction knowledge. The degree of concreteness of instantiations of proportions was varied between subjects. First-grade children learned to label proportions of objects with fraction. Proportions were presented either as concrete, colorful flowers...

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