Jennifer A Jackson

Jennifer A Jackson
British Antarctic Survey | BAS · Ecosystems Programme

PhD

About

215
Publications
27,311
Reads
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2,332
Citations
Additional affiliations
February 2010 - February 2015
British Antarctic Survey
Position
  • Geneticist
February 2010 - December 2016
British Antarctic Survey
Position
  • Researcher
July 2007 - March 2009
Oregon State University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (215)
Article
Full-text available
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) annually undertake the longest migrations between seasonal feeding and breeding grounds of any mammal. Despite this dispersal potential, discontinuous seasonal distributions and migratory patterns suggest that humpbacks form discrete regional populations within each ocean. To better understand the worldwide...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate estimation of historical abundance provides an essential baseline for judging the recovery of the great whales. This is particularly challenging for whales hunted prior to twentieth century modern whaling, as population-level catch records are often incomplete. Assessments of whale recovery using pre-modern exploitation indices are therefo...
Article
Full-text available
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are showing strong recovery from commercial whaling in the western South Atlantic. In this region, humpback whales migrate annually from their winter breeding grounds off the coast of Brazil to their summer feeding grounds near to the Polar Front, an area that includes the waters of South Georgia and the Sou...
Article
Full-text available
The South Georgia Shag Leucocarbo [atriceps] georgianus has breeding populations on the islands of South Georgia, the South Sandwich and South Orkney Islands. The South Orkney Islands are estimated to support ~ 18%–37% of the global population and South Georgia a further 37%–69%. Here, we examine changes in South Georgia Shag population size and pr...
Article
Full-text available
Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are a cosmopolitan species and perform long annual migrations between low-latitude breeding areas and high-latitude feeding areas. Their breeding populations appear to be spatially and genetically segregated due to long-term, maternally inherited fidelity to natal breeding areas. In the Southern Hemisphere,...
Article
Full-text available
Aim We investigated evolutionary relationships and biogeographical patterns within the genus Boeckella to evaluate (1) whether its current widespread distribution in the Southern Hemisphere is due to recent long-distance dispersal or long-term diversification; and (2) the age and origin of sub-Antarctic and Antarctic Boeckella species, with particu...
Article
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The study of cetacean strandings was globally recognised as a priority topic at the 2019 World Marine Mammal Conference, in recognition of its importance for understanding the threats to cetacean communities and, more broadly, the threats to ecosystem and human health. Rising multifaceted anthropogenic and environmental threats across the globe, as...
Article
Following the cessation of whaling, South Atlantic populations of humpback Megaptera novaeangliae and some other baleen whale species are recovering, but there has been limited monitoring of their recovery in the Scotia Arc, a former whaling epicentre and a hotspot for Antarctic krill Euphausia superba . To inform the management of krill fisheries,...
Article
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The Indian Ocean humpback dolphin Sousa plumbea has been described as South Africa’s most endangered marine mammal due to its low abundance, reliance on coastal habitats with increasing anthropogenic threats and high rates of mortality from bycatch in bather protection nets (BPNs). Although the species has been well studied in South Africa, only a...
Article
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Southern Ocean ecosystems are globally important. Processes in the Antarctic atmosphere, cryosphere, and the Southern Ocean directly influence global atmospheric and oceanic systems. Southern Ocean biogeochemistry has also been shown to have global importance. In contrast, ocean ecological processes are often seen as largely separate from the rest...
Article
Full-text available
Southern right whale vocalizations were recorded concurrently with visual observations off the sub-Antarctic Island of South Georgia, and the characteristics of these calls were described. Calls were also compared to those of humpback whales at South Georgia, to determine how the two species might reliably be distinguished acoustically. The souther...
Article
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Local drivers are human activities or processes that occur in specific locations, and cause physical or ecological change at the local or regional scale. Here, we consider marine and land-derived pollution, non-indigenous species, tourism and other human visits, exploitation of marine resources, recovery of marine mammals, and coastal change as a r...
Article
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The diet of Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) at South Georgia is dominated by Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba). During the breeding season, foraging trips by lactating female fur seals are constrained by their need to return to land to provision their pups. Post-breeding, seals disperse in order to feed and recover condition; estimate...
Article
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The massive impact that open-boat historical whaling (18th to 20th centuries) had on whale populations has been traditionally estimated from records of oil and baleen plate production. However, an unknown proportion of hunted whales were struck, wounded, eventually killed, but lost, and not included in these records, suggesting that whaling impact...
Article
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Blue whales Balaenoptera musculus at South Georgia were heavily exploited during 20 th century industrial whaling, to the point of local near-extirpation. Although legal whaling for blue whales ceased in the 1960s, and there were indications of blue whale recovery across the wider Southern Ocean area, blue whales were seldom seen in South Georgia w...
Article
Around 176500 whales were killed in the sub-Antarctic waters off South Georgia (South Atlantic) between 1904 and 1965. In recent decades, whales have once again become summer visitors, with the southern right whale (SRW) the most commonly reported species until 2011. Here, we assess the distribution, temporal pattern, health status and likely prey...
Article
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The massive number of seabirds (penguins and procellariiformes) and marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) – referred to here as top predators – is one of the most iconic components of the Antarctic and Southern Ocean. They play an important role as highly mobile consumers, structuring and connecting pelagic marine food webs and are widely studie...
Article
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Biogeographic patterns of globally widespread species are expected to reflect regional structure, as well as connectivity caused by occasional long-distance dispersal. We assessed the level and drivers of population structure, connectivity, and timescales of population isolation in one of the most widespread and ruderal plants in the world — the co...
Article
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As whales recover from commercial exploitation, they are increasing in abundance in habitats that they have been absent from for decades. However, studying the recovery and habitat use patterns of whales, particularly in remote and inaccessible regions, frequently poses logistical and economic challenges. Here we trial a new approach for measuring...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Over 170,000 whales were killed in the sub-Antarctic waters of South Georgia (Islas Georgias del Sur, SG, South Atlantic) from 1904 to 1965. In recent decades, whales are regular summer visitors, with the southern right whale (Eubalaena australis) and humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliea) most commonly reported. A 23-day cetacean survey was condu...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Report of the Workshop. Please use the following citation: Carroll EL, Charlton C, Vermeulen E, Clarke P and J. A. Jackson (Eds). 2020. Roadmap to success for the International Whaling Commission - Southern Ocean Research Partnership (IWC-SORP) Theme 6 - the Right Sentinel for Climate Change: linking southern right whale foraging ecology to demogra...
Article
Full-text available
As species recover from exploitation, continued assessments of connectivity and population structure are warranted to provide information for conservation and management. This is particularly true in species with high dispersal capacity, such as migratory whales, where patterns of connectivity could change rapidly. Here we build on a previous long-...
Article
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Environmental conditions were particularly severe during the Last Glacial Maximum, altering the distribution of the Southern Hemisphere biota, particularly at higher latitudes. The copepod Boeckella poppei is the only macroscopic continental invertebrate species known to be distributed today across the three main biogeographic regions in Antarctica...
Article
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Great whales have been detected using very‐high‐resolution satellite imagery, suggesting this technology could be used to monitor whales in remote areas. However, the application of this method to whale studies is at an early developmental stage and several technical factors need to be addressed, including capacity for species differentiation and t...
Article
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We test the ability of Very High Resolution satellite (VHR) imagery to detect stranded whales using both manual and automated methods. We use the 2015 mass mortality event in the Gulf of Penas locality, central Patagonia, Chile, as an initial case study. This event was the largest known mass mortality of baleen whales, with at least 343 whales, mai...
Article
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The recovery of whale populations from centuries of exploitation will have important management and ecological implications due to greater exposure to anthropogenic activities and increasing prey consumption. Here, a Bayesian population model integrates catch data, estimates of abundance, and information on genetics and biology to assess the recove...
Article
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Gentoo penguins Pygoscelis papua breed at a number of sites at the West Antarctic Peninsula, including Goudier Island, Port Lockroy—the longest studied location for tourist-penguin interactions in the Antarctic. These penguins annually encounter some of the highest numbers of tourists in the whole of Antarctica. Using yearly count data from all ten...
Article
Full-text available
Large‐bodied animals such as baleen whales can now be detected with very high resolution (VHR) satellite imagery, allowing for scientific studies of whales in remote and inaccessible areas where traditional survey methods are limited or impractical. Here we present the first study of baleen whales using the WorldView‐3 satellite, which has a maximu...
Poster
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The Quaternary brought numerous cycles of ice sheet extension and contraction across the Antarctic continent, resulting in major disruption of terrestrial habitats and the extinction of diverse taxa. Currently there are two main hypotheses to explain the present-day occurrence of freshwater biota in Antarctica: 1) recent colonization from lower lat...
Article
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Dietary studies of marine predators offer an immediate signal of foodweb changes occurring at lower trophic levels, and therefore are often used to assess the ecosystem status of marine systems. Conventionally, these studies are based on morphological analysis of prey remains in stomach contents, involving invasive and de- structive techniques to c...
Article
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From glacial reconstructions it is clear that Antarctic terrestrial life must have been extremely limited throughout Quaternary glacial periods. In contrast, recent biological studies provide clear evidence for long-term in situ persistence throughout glacial times within most extant Antarctic faunal and several microbial groups. However, even now,...
Article
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The Antarctic–South American bank-forming moss Chorisodontium aciphyllum is known for having the oldest sub-fossils of any extant plant in Antarctica as well as extreme survival abilities, making it a candidate species for possible long-term survival in Antarctica. Applying phylogeographic and population genetic methods using the plastid markers tr...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing concern about the impacts of climate change on ecosystems is prompting ecologists and ecosystem managers to seek reliable projections of physical drivers of change. The use of global climate models in ecology is growing, although drawing ecologically meaningful conclusions can be problematic. The expertise required to access and interpre...
Article
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A bipolar disjunction is an extreme, yet common, biogeographic pattern in non-vascular plants, yet its underlyingmechanisms (vicariance or long-distance dispersal), origin and timing remain poorly understood. Here, combining a large-scale population dataset and multiple dating analyses, we examine the biogeography of four bipolar Polytrichales moss...
Data
Cumulative resightings of Chilean blue whales off Isla de Chiloé from 2004–2011. (PDF)
Data
Summary of top identifiable Pradel models explored in MARK for Chilean blue whales. (DOCX)
Data
Right side mark resights of Chilean blue whales from Isla de Chiloé 2005–2012. (INP)
Data
Summary of Chilean blue whale sightings, sightings per unit effort (SPUE) and photo-identification after photo-quality control. (DOCX)
Data
Summary of Chilean blue whale results from U-CARE tests of goodness-of-fit between the left and right side datasets and various Cormack-Jolly-Seber models. (DOCX)
Data
Chilean blue whale abundance estimates from closed mark-recapture models calculated in CAPTURE for 2004/5-2012. (DOCX)
Data
Left side mark resights of Chilean blue whales from Isla de Chiloé 2004–2012. (INP)
Data
Summary of top p/ϕ-identifiable POPAN models explored in MARK for Chilean blue whales. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Since 1970, blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) have been seen feeding in the waters off southern Chile during the summer and autumn (December to May). Investigation of the genetic, acoustic and morphological characteristics of these blue whales shows that they are a distinct but unnamed subspecies, called the Chilean blue whales. Photo-identificat...
Article
Full-text available
We report long-term changes in population size of three species of sympatrically breeding pygoscelid penguins: Adélie (Pygoscelis adeliae), chinstrap (Pygoscelis antarctica) and gentoo (Pygoscelis papua ellsworthii) over a 38 year period at Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, based on annual counts from selected colonies and decadal all-island syst...
Article
Full-text available
The southern giant petrel (Macronectes giganteus) has a circumpolar distribution and breeds on subantarctic islands and a few continental Antarctic sites. Although this species has recently been down-listed to “Least Concern” by the World Conservation Union (IUCN), there are strong fluctuations in abundance and variable long-term trends recorded at...
Data
Table S1 Key biological parameters estimated for the New Zealand southern right whale over ‘catch maximum’ and ‘catch minimum’ population modelling scenarios, with no Nfloor constraint imposed (male and female recaptures and population model fitted to relative abundance). Table S2 shows posterior medians and 95% probability intervals for key biolog...
Data
Text S1 describes the population model construction in detail. Text S2 describes how the prior distribution for each catch history was constructed.
Article
Full-text available
Capture−recapture studies offer a powerful tool to assess abundance, survival and population rate of change (λ). A previous capture−recapture study, based on DNA profiles, esti- mated that the IUCN-listed Endangered Oceania population of humpback whales had a super- population size of 4329 whales (95% confidence limits, CL: 3345, 5315) and λ = 1.03...
Article
Full-text available
Information regarding the echinoids in this dataset is based on the Agassiz Trawl (AGT) and epibenthic sledge (EBS) samples collected during the British Antarctic Survey cruise JR275 on the RRS James Clark Ross in the austral summer 2012. A total of 56 (1 at the South Orkneys and 55 in the Eastern Weddell Sea) Agassiz Trawl and 18 (2 at the South O...