Jennifer Hinton

Jennifer Hinton
Lund University | LU

PhD in Sustainability Science and Economics
I am currently doing research in the Postgrowth Welfare Systems project, at Lund University.

About

16
Publications
9,392
Reads
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218
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
215 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Introduction
My research focuses on how societies relate to profit and how this relationship affects global sustainability challenges. My doctoral thesis puts forth relationship-to-profit theory, which explains how for-profit business structures systemically drive unsustainable dynamics, such as environmental degradation and inequality; as well as why not-for-profit types business and markets are more compatible with sustainability. I use systems analysis, ecological economics, and institutional economics.

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
Second-hand consumption of clothing can support the transition to circular economies by prolonging the lifespan of products through reuse. Historically, not-for-profit businesses have been dominant actors in second-hand markets across Western Europe and North America. However, with the growing interest in second-hand consumption, for-profit firms h...
Research
Full-text available
This article seeks to unpack how the generation of profit impacts social and ecological sustainability. It begins by framing profit as not necessarily sustainable or exploitative. Social and ecological inputs and impacts are necessary for economic processes and when social and ecological stakeholders are not compensated for their contributions to t...
Research
Full-text available
This paper examines the implications of the argument that sustainable businesses should see profit as a means, not an end. It develops a heuristic conceptual framework that identifies two main ways in which a business can treat profit as an end: first, through voluntary objectives; and secondly, through private financial rights. To illustrate the u...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter offers an overview and explanation of how society’s relationship-to-profit plays a significant role in determining social and ecological outcomes. The way in which societies relate to profit plays out in terms of both formal and informal institutions. One formal institution that is key for sustainability is relationship-to-profit , the...
Article
Full-text available
As there has been no evidence of the kind of environmental decoupling necessary to allow for green economic growth, academic and activist discussions alike have turned to exploring post-growth pathways. Such a transformation entails a significant shift in economic institutions, yet post-growth analyses of what is problematic about businesses and ho...
Thesis
Full-text available
How does the relationship between business and profit affect social and ecological sustainability? Many sustainability scholars have identified competition for profit in the market as a key driver of social exploitation and environmental destruction. Yet, studies rarely question whether businesses and markets have to be profit-seeking. The widespre...
Chapter
Nowadays, the need for “Social and Solidarity Economy” reflects the existence of deep inequal- ities (economic, social, health, etc.), which are at the origin of the deterioration of living conditions, despite an increase in the wealth of nations (Utting 2015; Neamtan 2002). This divorce between eco- nomic growth and social development drives soci-...
Article
Full-text available
This conceptual article contributes to the post-growth strand of political ecology literature, which seeks to find sustainable ways of organizing the economy that do not require economic growth. It explores the idea that transitioning to post-growth societies requires a transition in the relationship-to-profit of business. I first conceptualize rel...
Preprint
Full-text available
Response to Folke et al. Transnational corporations and the challenge of biosphere stewardship. Nat. Ecol. Evol. 3, 1396-1401 (2019).
Article
Full-text available
Background: The Planetary Boundaries concept (PBc) has emerged as a key global sustainability concept in international sustainable development arenas. Initially presented as an agenda for global sustainability research, it now shows potential for sustainability governance. We use the fact that it is widely cited in scientific literature (>3500 cita...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this book, we outline a model of a non-capitalist market economy based on not-for-profit forms of business. This work presents both a critique of the current economic system and a vision of a more socially, economically, and ecologically sustainable economy. The point of departure is the purpose and profit-orientation embedded in the legal forms...
Article
Full-text available
At the heart of the failing growth-based, capitalist system is the 'for-profit' way of doing business. It is based on the idea that humans are mostly selfish and competitive, so the best way to motivate economic activity is to appeal to individual self-interest. Most approaches to resolve capitalism's tendency to increasingly create socioeconomic i...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The goal is to help bring about a future in which the economy allows for a safe and just operating space for humanity. In light of the fact that human societies are using more resources and creating more waste than the biosphere can handle, this requires that the economy provide for more equitable human flourishing while using and wasting much less than it does today. Thus, true sustainability requires that we move beyond the growth-based economic paradigm.