Jennifer Gongola

Jennifer Gongola
University of Southern California | USC · Gould School of Law

Ph.D.

About

13
Publications
5,028
Reads
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74
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2019 - August 2020
University of Southern California
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Under Professor Tom Lyon in the Child Investigative Interviewing Lab https://uscchildinterviewinglab.com/
Education
September 2014 - June 2019
University of California, Irvine
Field of study
  • Psychological Science
September 2012 - June 2014
University of Southern California
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
Polymorphic or crossover sexual offenders have victims in different categories (e.g., adult and child victims; male and female victims; related and non-related victims). The present study systematically reviewed and synthesized the existing literature in an effort to ascertain the prevalence of crossover among sexual offenders that takes into accou...
Article
Full-text available
Adults often fail to recognize the ambiguity of children's unelaborated responses to ‘Do you know/remember (DYK/R) if/whether’ questions. Two studies examined whether sample questions and/or an explicit instruction would improve adults' ability to recognize referential ambiguity in children's testimony. In Study 1 (N = 383), participants rarely rec...
Article
Full-text available
When interviewing a child who may have witnessed a crime, the interviewer must ask carefully directed questions in order to elicit a truthful statement from the child. The presented work uses Granger causal analysis to examine and represent child-interviewer interaction dynamics over such an interview. Our work demonstrates that Granger Causal anal...
Article
Full-text available
Concealment (i.e., omitting information without saying anything untrue) has received little empirical attention relative to falsification (i.e., false statements). This study examined free recall reports among a sample of 349 maltreated and non‐maltreated children ages four to nine, and found that concealment of a minor transgression was significan...
Article
Full-text available
One common and unfortunately overlooked obstacle to the detection of sexual abuse is non-disclosure by children. Non-disclosure may be expressed via concealment in response to recall questions or via active denials in response to recognition (e.g., yes/no) questions. In two studies, we evaluated whether adults’ ability to discern true and false den...
Article
Full-text available
The putative confession (PC) instructions (“[suspect] told me everything that happened and wants you to tell the truth”) increases children’s honesty. However, research has shown that children who maintain secrecy despite the PC are more convincing. We examined whether (a) the PC undermines adults’ deception detection abilities or (b) children who...
Article
Full-text available
The putative confession instruction (“[suspect] told me everything that happened and wants you to tell the truth”) during forensic interviews with children has been shown to increase the accuracy of children’s statements, but it is unclear whether adult’s perceptions are sensitive to this salutary effect. The present study examined how adults perce...
Article
The role of experts and their presentation of testimony in insanity cases remain controversial. In order to decrease possible expert bias associated with this testimony, a number of different alternatives to adversarial presentation have been suggested. Two such alternatives are the use of court‐appointed experts and the use of concurrent testimony...
Article
The United States Supreme Court recently abolished mandatory life in prison without parole (LWOP) for juvenile offenders, holding that the practice is inconsistent with the eighth amendment’s cruel and unusual punishment clause, and its “evolving standards of decency” jurisprudence. The Court explicitly left open the question of whether nonmandator...
Article
Full-text available
Although research reveals that children as young as 3 can use deception and will take steps to obscure truth, research concerning how well others detect children's deceptive efforts remains unclear. Yet adults regularly assess whether children are telling the truth in a variety of contexts, including at school, in the home, and in legal settings, p...

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