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Jennifer Danzy Cramer

Jennifer Danzy Cramer
ROC USA

Ph.D.

About

54
Publications
8,962
Reads
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406
Citations
Citations since 2016
27 Research Items
362 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220204060
20162017201820192020202120220204060
20162017201820192020202120220204060
Introduction
Education
August 2007 - August 2012
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Field of study
  • Anthropology
August 2004 - July 2007
New Mexico State University
Field of study
  • Anthropology
August 1999 - June 2004
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Field of study
  • Biology and Anthropology (double major)

Publications

Publications (54)
Article
Objectives Direct comparative work in morphology and growth on widely dispersed wild primate taxa is rarely accomplished, yet critical to understanding ecogeographic variation, plastic local variation in response to human impacts, and variation in patterns of growth and sexual dimorphism. We investigated population variation in morphology and growt...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing contact between humans and non-human primates provides an opportunity for the transfer of potential pathogens or antimicrobial resistance between host species. We have investigated genomic diversity and antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from four species of non-human primates in the Gambia: Papio papio (n=22), Chloroc...
Article
Full-text available
Background The microbiota plays an important role in HIV pathogenesis in humans. Microbiota can impact health through several pathways such as increasing inflammation in the gut, metabolites of bacterial origin, and microbial translocation from the gut to the periphery which contributes to systemic chronic inflammation and immune activation and the...
Book
Cambridge Core - Animal Behaviour - Savanna Monkeys - by Trudy R. Turner
Article
In the last 300 thousand years, the genus Chlorocebus expanded from equatorial Africa into the southernmost latitudes of the continent, where colder climate was a probable driver of natural selection. We investigated population-level genetic variation in the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 ( UCP1 ) gene region—implicated in non-shivering thermog...
Preprint
The genus Chlorocebus is widely distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa, and in the last 300 thousand years expanded from equatorial Africa into the southernmost latitudes of the continent. In these new environments, colder climate was a likely driver of natural selection. We investigated population-level genetic variation in the mitochondrial un...
Article
Full-text available
Compassion fatigue is well documented among professionals working in social service fields such as healthcare, emergency response, social work, and education. In higher education, there is a growing demand for faculty led student mental health support and life coaching services to support student retention and success. Students in online settings t...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing contact between humans and non-human primates provides an opportunity for the transfer of potential pathogens or antimicrobial resistance between different host species. We have investigated genetic diversity and antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from a range of non-human primates dispersed across the Gambia: patas mo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anthropogenic landscapes are rapidly replacing natural nonhuman primate habitats. Yet, the access to anthropogenic resources on primate biology, health, and fitness remain poorly studied. Given their ubiquity across a range of human impacted landscapes, from cities to national parks, savanna monkeys ( Chlorocebus spp.) provide an excellent study sy...
Preprint
Full-text available
Increasing contact between humans and non-human primates provides an opportunity for the transfer of potential pathogens or antimicrobial resistance between host species. We have investigated genomic diversity, and antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from four species of non-human primate in the Gambia: Papio papio (n=22), Chloroc...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: The microbiota plays an important role in HIV pathogenesis in humans. Microbiota can impact health through several pathways such as increasing inflammation in the gut, metabolites of bacterial origin, and microbial translocation from the gut to the periphery which contributes to systemic chronic inflammation, immune activation, and the...
Article
American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) membership surveys from 1996 and 1998 revealed significant gender disparities in academic status. A 2014 follow-up survey showed that gender equality had improved, particularly with respect to the number of women in tenure-stream positions. However, although women comprised 70% of AAPA members...
Preprint
American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) membership surveys from 1996 and 1998 revealed significant gender disparities in academic status. A 2014 follow-up survey showed that gender equality had improved, particularly with respect to the number of women in tenure-stream positions. However, although women comprised 70% of AAPA members...
Article
Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and animals. We genome sequenced 90 S. aureus isolates from The Gambia: 46 isolates from invasive disease in humans, 13 human carriage isolates, and 31 monkey carriage isolates. We inferred multiple anthroponotic transmissions of S. aureus from humans to green monkeys (Chlorocebus sabaeus) in...
Article
Full-text available
Importance: The population structures of Staphylococcus aureus in humans and monkeys in sub-Saharan Africa have been previously described using MLST. However, these data lack the power to accurately infer details regarding the origin and maintenance of new adaptive lineages. Here, we describe the use of whole genome sequencing to detect transmissi...
Article
Weight and 34 morphological measurements were obtained from 103 vervet monkeys living either in the wild or in captive colonies derived from the wild populations on the island of St. Kitts in the Eastern Caribbean. All measures were taken during the same week, eliminating bias that might result from changing seasonal environmental conditions. Verve...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The human gut microbiota interacts closely with human diet and physiology. To better understand the mechanisms behind this relationship, gut microbiome research relies on complementing human studies with manipulations of animal models, including non-human primates. However, due to unique aspects of human diet and physiology, it is like...
Article
Sexual traits vary tremendously in static allometry. This variation may be explained in part by body size-related differences in the strength of selection. We tested this hypothesis in two populations of vervet monkeys, using estimates of the level of condition dependence for different morphological traits as a proxy for body size-related variation...
Article
Old World Monkeys (Cercopithecoidea) are unusual among primates for the high percentage of species exhibiting circumperineal coloration, as well as the large percentage of highly terrestrial species. Kingdon [1974, 1980] suggested that circumperineal skin coloration is functionally related to terrestriality but this hypothesis has not been tested....
Article
Full-text available
In many animal groups, the size of male genitalia scales shallowly with individual body size. This widespread pattern appears to admit some exceptions. For instance, steep allometries have been reported for vertebrate genitalia. This exception, however, may be due to a confounding effect arising from the continued growth of some structures during a...
Article
A growing focus of nonhuman primate conservation and management planning concerns factors affecting the dynamics of parasite infection and disease transmission. Here, we examine the effects of anthropogenic and environmental components of the landscape on the prevalence, richness, and species diversity of gastrointestinal parasites in wild-caught v...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: African green monkeys (AGMs) are naturally infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) at high prevalence levels and do not progress to AIDS. Sexual transmission is the main transmission route in AGM, while mother-to-infant transmission (MTIT) is negligible. We investigated SIV transmission in wild AGMs to assess whether or not h...
Article
Full-text available
A growing focus of nonhuman primate conservation and management planning concerns factors affecting the dynamics of parasite infection and disease transmission. Here, we examine the effects of anthropogenic and environmental components of the landscape on the prevalence, richness, and species diversity of gastrointestinal parasites in wild-caught v...
Article
Vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops) exhibit bright blue scrotal skin which may function to mediate social interactions by acting as a socio-sexual signal. Previous research on scrotal coloration among vervet monkeys was limited to experimental work on captive Ch. a. sabaeus, the least colorful vervet subspecies, and two field studies of the more...
Article
Full-text available
Although the proximate mechanisms behind the formation of copulatory plugs are well understood, their distribution and function among primates remain largely unstudied. During a study of female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) mating behaviour on Cayo Santiago, we examined the pattern of the distribution of visible copulatory plugs among females and...
Conference Paper
Understanding the effects of a human presence on the anatomy and physiology of primates has become a more pressing concern as more and more primate groups are being forced into interactions with encroaching human populations. This study surveyed human alterations made within the home ranges of vervet (Cercopithecus aethiops) groups at nine sites in...

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