Jennifer L Allen

Jennifer L Allen
University of Bath | UB · Department of Psychology

PhD MClinPsych CPsychol

About

51
Publications
36,573
Reads
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963
Citations
Introduction
Dr Jennifer Allen, Director of the SHINE research lab, is a Reader and Clinical Psychologist specialising in child and adolescent mental health. The SHINE research lab is dedicated to understanding the role of ecological processes in shaping risk pathways to child psychopathology, and the translation of models of risk and resilience into school and family-based interventions.
Additional affiliations
February 2007 - January 2009
September 2005 - January 2007
UNSW Sydney
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 1999 - September 2005
Macquarie University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
Callous-unemotional (CU) traits have been associated with atypical responses to reward and punishment cues, with evidence suggesting that such traits may shape caregiver use of reward and punishment practices over time. To date, research has predominantly focused on parental rewards and discipline, with far less attention paid to teacher behavior m...
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Callous-unemotional traits (CU) traits are characterized by low empathy, guilt, and reduced sensitivity to others’ feelings, along with a reduced drive for social affiliation. However, little is known about the relationships between CU traits and social affiliation in the school context, or the influence of gender on these associations....
Article
Full-text available
Poor educational outcomes are common among children with antisocial behavior problems, including among a subgroup of antisocial children with callous-unemotional traits, who show deficits in empathy, guilt, and prosociality. However, few studies have explored the unique contributions of antisocial behavior and callous-unemotional traits to school o...
Book
Among the many issues faced by families in the world today, child and adolescent mental health is now understood to be particularly fundamental. This book details the clinical skills, knowledge, and attitudes that form the core competencies for the delivery of evidence-based family interventions for mental health problems of childhood and adolescen...
Chapter
The training of mental health practitioners has seen a growing focus on core competencies in recent years in response to the need for guidance in the implementation of evidence-based treatment of mental disorders. This chapter outlines the aims and advantages of a competency-based approach and describes existing models of competencies in the treatm...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Excessive alcohol use is common in young people and is associated with a range of adverse consequences including an increased risk of depression. Alcohol interventions are known to be effective in young people, however it is not known if these interventions can also improve depression. Objective: To investigate whether psychosocial i...
Preprint
Background High smoking prevalence leads to increased morbidity and mortality in individuals with depression/anxiety. Integrated interventions targeting both smoking and mood have been found to be more effective than those targeting smoking alone, but the mechanisms of change of these integrated interventions have not been investigated. Aims This...
Research Proposal
Full-text available
Protocol for 'The Association Between Callous-Unemotional Traits and Executive Functioning in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review' Please see protocol online here: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=292112 Please contact if you have any unpublished manuscripts on this topic.
Research
Full-text available
Protocol for a systematic review, see Prospero: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.php?RecordID=298993
Article
Full-text available
The current study investigated the measurement invariance of the Inventory of Callous-Unemotional Traits in school-attending youth in the UK (N = 437) and China (N = 364). The original 24-item ICU and five shortened versions proposed in previous studies were tested and compared using confirmatory factor analysis in the UK sample. Results indicated...
Chapter
Child and adolescent mental health is understood to be highly embedded in the family system, particularly the parent-child relationship. Indeed, models of risk pathways to psychopathology emphasise interactions and transactions between the family environment and individual differences at the child-level, including gene-environment interplay. Therap...
Article
Full-text available
Positive teacher-child relationships (TCRs) are vital for pupil well-being and are especially important for at-risk children. This qualitative study investigated the impact of restrictive physical interventions (RPIs) on TCRs in focus groups comprising ten boys aged 9-11 years attending two special schools in England. We examined the immediate and...
Research
Full-text available
Call for unpublished manuscripts on CU traits and substance abuse! Please get in touch, ja980@bath.ac.uk
Article
Full-text available
Background. Callous-unemotional (CU) traits are related to low achievement but not to deficits in verbal ability, commonly regarded as a major risk factor for poor academic outcomes in antisocial youth. This suggests that CU traits may have utility in explaining heterogeneous risk pathways for poor school performance in antisocial children. Reduced...
Article
Full-text available
Considerable evidence now exists for callous and unemotional (CU) traits as markers for a high-risk pathway to child and adolescent conduct problems implicating unique risk processes and treatment needs, but research has been limited largely to Western countries. We review the evidence base related to CU traits in Asian countries that has emerged i...
Chapter
Full-text available
Disruptive behavior is a heterogeneous construct that encompasses a variety of symptoms including tantrums, lying, cheating, noncompliance, theft and assault. If these symptoms are severe, persistent, and accompanied by impairment in social contexts (e.g., family, peers, school), the individual may meet the criteria for one of the two diagnoses for...
Method
A teacher-report measure of teacher responses to anxiety in children
Article
Full-text available
Callous-unemotional (CU) traits and male gender are both known risk factors for poor academic outcomes in children and adolescents. However, despite gender differences in CU trait severity, comorbid difficulties and correlates of CU traits research has yet to examine whether the CU traits and male gender may work together to increase risk for poor...
Article
Full-text available
Callous-unemotional (CU) traits comprise a temperament dimension characterized by low empathy, interpersonal callousness, restricted affect and a lack of concern for performance. CU traits are the hallmark feature of psychopathy in youth and are associated with more varied, severe and stable antisocial behavior. However, little is known about the p...
Article
Full-text available
Available from Hodder Education, see: https://www.hoddereducation.co.uk/product?Product=9781471800962
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to stressors is associated with an increased risk for child anxiety. Investigating the family origins of stressors may provide promising avenues for identifying and intervening with children at-risk for the onset of anxiety disorders and their families. The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of parent-dependent negative life ev...
Chapter
Full-text available
There is consistent evidence for an inverse association between intelligence and antisocial behaviour. This link is evident for delinquency (official and self-reported) and clinical diagnoses of conduct disorder, but not for recidivism or illegal drug use. The IQ-crime/delinquency relationship is the strongest with regard to verbal ability, with de...
Article
Full-text available
This study describes the development and evaluation of a new measure, the Teacher Responses to Anxiety in Children (TRAC) questionnaire in 74 primary school teachers. TRAC presents 9 hypothetical scenarios in which a child displays generalized anxiety/worry, social anxiety or separation anxiety symptoms. Teachers rate each scenario on six subscales...
Article
Full-text available
Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious public health issue with innumerable costs to the victims, children, and families affected as well as society at large. The evidence is conclusive regarding a strong association between exposure to IPV and children’s externalizing problems. Moving forward, the next step is to enhance our understanding of...
Chapter
The effective treatment of child psychopathology is often determined by the effectiveness with which a clinician is able to facilitate targeted and sustained change in parenting. In this chapter we provide an overview of evidence-based parenting programs, and the principles and strategies that are key to working therapeutically with parents in form...
Chapter
Full-text available
The effective treatment of child psychopathology is often determined by the effectiveness with which a clinician is able to facilitate targeted and sustained change in parenting. In this chapter we provide an overview of evidence-based parenting programmes, and the principles and strategies that are key to working therapeutically with parents in fo...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between callous-unemotional (CU) traits and response to rewards and discipline in adolescent boys using a mixed methods approach. Participants comprised 39 boys aged between 12 and 13 years and eight teachers. Quantitative findings showed that CU traits were significantly related to punishme...
Article
Full-text available
Children with conduct problems and co-occurring callous-unemotional (CU) traits show more severe, stable, and aggressive antisocial behaviors than those without CU traits. Exposure to negative life events has been identified as an important contributing factor to the expression of CU traits across time, although the directionality of this effect ha...
Article
This study examined two main questions: 1) Is there a direct link between psychopathic traits and intelligence? 2) Is the combination of psychopathic traits and high IQ related to more severe antisocial behaviour in adolescents? IOE Research Briefings are short descriptions of significant research findings, based on the wide range of projects carri...
Article
Full-text available
We previously hypothesised that the early development of psychopathy is associated with a failure to attend to the eyes of attachment figures, and we have presented preliminary data from a parent-child 'love' scenario in support of this. Here, we confirm the association in a larger sample and test mechanisms of impaired eye contact during expressio...
Article
This work examined the eye gaze of young children during a parental display of love and affection. IOE Research Briefings are short descriptions of significant research findings, based on the wide range of projects carried out by IOE researchers.
Article
Full-text available
Introduction Anxiety disorders are common and associated with significant impairment in family, peer and academic domains. They typically emerge in childhood or adolescence (Kessler et al., 2005), take a chronic and recurrent course if left untreated (Last et al., 1996), and increase the risk for mental health problems including other anxiety disor...
Data
Full-text available
This study compared the number and impact of maternally reported life events experienced by children assessed using interview and checklist approaches. Psychometric properties of a new checklist measure were also examined. Participants were 80 children aged 7 to 16 years recruited from the general community. Mothers completed an interview, the Psyc...
Method
Full-text available
The Child and Adolescent Survey of Experiences (CASE; Allen, Rapee, & Sandberg, 2012) was developed to assess positive and negative childhood and adolescent life experiences, and featured parent and child self-report versions. The CASE was based on an established investigator-based interview, the Psychosocial Assessment of Child Experiences (PACE;...
Article
Full-text available
A propensity to attend to other people's emotions is a necessary condition for human empathy. To test our hypothesis that psychopathic disorder begins as a failure to attend to the eyes of attachment figures, using a `love' scenario in young children. Children with oppositional defiant disorder, assessed for callous-unemotional traits, and a contro...
Article
Full-text available
This report describes the feasibility and psychometric properties of the child version of the Separation Anxiety Daily Diary (SADD-C) in 125 children (ages 7-14 years) from German-speaking areas of Switzerland. Children with separation anxiety disorder (SAD; n = 58), "other" anxiety disorders (n = 36), and healthy controls (n = 31) recorded the fre...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examines frequency of DSM-IV symptom and diagnostic criteria for separation anxiety disorder (SAD) by informant, age, and sex. Children aged 4-15 years with a primary DSM-IV diagnosis of SAD (N=106) were assessed using structured diagnostic interviews (Kinder-DIPS; DSM-IV-TR Version). Frequency of DSM-IV symptom and diagnostic cri...
Article
Full-text available
The current study evaluated the feasibility and validity of a parent-report measure of separation anxiety, the Separation Anxiety Daily Diary (SADD). Mother and child participants consisted of three groups: 96 children (aged 4-15 years) with separation anxiety disorder, 49 children with "other" anxiety disorders, and 43 healthy controls. The SADD a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: For research in e.g. asthma reactions to stressful life events in children, a formalised interview has been developed and validated. The corresponding PACE interview (Psychosocial Assessment of Childhood Experiences) has been used to develop a checklist, the Child and Adolescent Survey of Experiences (CASE). The psychometric properties...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examined the impact of training mothers in high-elaborative, emotional reminiscing on children's autobiographical memory and emotion knowledge. Eighty mothers were randomly allocated to one of two training conditions: in the reminiscing condition, mothers were encouraged to reminisce by asking their children (aged 3.5 to 5 years)...
Article
Full-text available
To assess the effectiveness of providing training in elaborative, emotion rich reminiscing (emotional reminiscing, ER) as an adjunct to Parent Management Training (PMT) for parents of children (N = 38, M age = 56.9, SD = 15.8 months) with oppositional behaviors. Control parents received PMT and non-language adjunct intervention, child-directed play...
Article
Full-text available
Many studies have reported that anxious children experience more negative life events than controls. However, studies have not yet addressed the possibility that this difference may be due to comorbidity with non-anxiety disorders. Furthermore, presence of psychopathology may also lead children to act in ways that increases frequency of negative li...
Article
Full-text available
The present study compared the number of severe life events and chronic adversities as reported retrospectively by mothers of children with an anxiety disorder (n = 39) prior to the onset of their most recent episode, with controls (n = 39) matched for age and sex. The parent version of the Psychosocial Assessment of Childhood Experiences (PACE) wa...
Article
Full-text available
The trend to older maternal age at first birth is well established in Western countries and biological risk factors, particularly declining fertility, are well documented. Less is known, however, about the psychosocial well-being of older first time parents. This study explores differences in psychosocial adjustment during pregnancy in older (mater...
Data
Full-text available
There is evidence suggesting that obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) in adults may be associated with an impaired ability to recognise the facial expression of disgust (Sprengelmeyer et al., 1997a; Woody, Corcoran, & Tolin, in press). It has been suggested that this impairment begins in childhood when the recognition of emotional expressions is be...
Chapter
Full-text available
Anxiety is a normal human reaction, but becomes a problem when it begins to interfere with a child’s education, family and peer relationships, self-esteem, general happiness or ability to participate in everyday activities. Factors that need to be considered when deciding whether or not a child’s fear is “abnormal” include the degree of distress ex...
Article
Full-text available
Most general practitioners (GPs) are currently treating a small number of patients with schizophrenia; however, little is known about GPs' experiences in this area. This paper examines the attitudes and roles of Australian GPs in the treatment of schizophrenia and their relationships with specialist services. A total of 192 GPs' ratings of possible...
Article
Full-text available
To examine differences between samples of schizophrenia patients recruited from general practice and public mental health services. Demographic, psychosocial, disability and 12-month service utilization data are reported from a multicentered survey of psychotic disorders and an associated study of schizophrenia in general practice. Patients with sc...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
I'm looking for any information on how the use of restrictive physical interventions with children came about; in particular if they had any theoretical basis to their use; and also for views of those from different perepctives on child development (e.g., attachment, behavioural) on RPIs and why these different perspectives are for or against their use, if they are viewed as acceptable, under what circumstances and so on. The literature is mainly on adult psychiatric hospitals, and much more limited in relation to children. Thanks for your help!
Question
How do you determine whether your sample size is large enough for a mediational analysis (using process)?

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Examining the presentation and impact of CU traits in the school context, including' risk and protective and factors; with the broader goal of informing school-based intervention.