Jennie Moore

Jennie Moore
British Columbia Institute of Technology | BCIT · President's Office

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
6,671
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284
Citations
Introduction
I lead research initiatives on application of integrated urban metabolism, consumption-based GHG emissions inventory, and ecological footprint assessment based on an "Ecocity Footprint Tool" developed through my PhD research at UBC under the supervision of Professor Emeritus William E. Rees. I also work with cities that are piloting my tool to assess their impacts.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Humanity’s demand for resources exceeds Earth’s carrying capacity (ECC), defined as the total regenerative and assimilative capacities of our planet. Cities are key hubs for mitigation since they host almost 60 % of the global population and are responsible for most of global demand for energy and material resources. Considering experts’ calls for...
Book
This book presents a selection of the best papers submitted to the International Ecocity World Summit held in Vancouver, October 7-11, 2019. The objective is to accelerate knowledge dissemination about the development of ecocities through attention to what constitutes an ecocity, what cities around the world are doing, what Vancouver as an emerging...
Chapter
This chapter probes the gap between the rhetoric of Vancouver-as-sustainable-city and the evidence that tells a different story. Specifically, we explore whether Vancouver is sustainable as defined by operating within ecological carrying capacity using two metrics: 1. ecological footprint, 2. consumption-based emissions inventory measuring greenhou...
Article
Full-text available
The global urban transition increasingly positions cities as important influencers in determining sustainability outcomes. Urban sustainability literature tends to focus on the built environment as a solution space for reducing energy and materials demand; however, equally important is the consumption characteristics of the people who occupy the ci...
Article
Ecological Footprint Analysis (EFA) at the city or regional scale does not typically include air travel due to a lack of readily available data. However, knowing the “load” placed on nature by various lifestyle choices, including air travel, is essential if we hope to enable society to live sustainably within ecological limits. This paper provides...
Article
Full-text available
Ecological footprint analysis (EFA) can be used by cities to account for their on-going demands on global renewable resources. To date, EFA has not been fully implemented as an urban policy and planning tool in part due to limitations of local data availability. In this paper we focus on the material consumption component of the urban ecological fo...
Article
As the world urbanizes, the role of cities in determining sustainability outcomes grows in importance. Cities are the dominant form of human habitat, and most of the world's resources are either directly or indirectly consumed in cities. Sustainable city analysis and management requires understanding the demands a city places on a wider geographica...
Chapter
Full-text available
In Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed, Jared Diamond asks the obvious question of a forest-dependent society: "What was the Easter Islander who cut down the last tree thinking?" For those familiar with the human tendency to habituate to virtually any conditions, the answer might very well be "nothing much". The individual who cut dow...
Article
Full-text available
Agriculture contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs), with estimates of agriculture's contribution ranging from 10% to 25% of total global GHG emissions per year. The science regarding mitigating (reducing and removing) GHGs through agriculture is conflicting and inconclusive. However, the severity and urgency of climate c...
Article
Full-text available
Significant greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions from all sectors of human enterprise are necessary to avoid further effects and reduce the current effects of climate change. Agriculture and the global food system are estimated to contribute to one-third of all anthropogenic GHGs. In British Columbia, Canada, mandated GHG reduction targets and voluntary...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The purpose of this project is to understand how a handful of high-consuming cities around the world are achieving absolute reductions in energy and material throughput and how this might be translated into policy and action for living within Earth's carrying capacity.